Sharing, Promise-keeping, Forgiveness: Part 6

The development project as an attempt to bring all societies “forward,” along a supposed continuum, is unjustifiable.  And yet there is much important work to be done that looks very much like, and is even called, “development.”  Without development theory as a guiding framework, why do we do this work?  I have tried to explain the philosophical underpinnings for Tandana’s work, describing how they led to the work we do, but even more importantly, to the way in which we do this work. 

Español

Français

In a series of posts you will find here, I illustrate how the principles on which Tandana is founded play out in concrete application through discussions of my own experiences as well as those of community members and volunteers who have worked with Tandana.  We see how reaching out to others with a personal approach leads, both in theory and in practice, to a world that is, incrementally, more peaceful and more just.  This personal approach could serve not only as impetus for one organization’s work but also to transform the character and effects of other groups seeking right relationship with others.  This is the sixth in a series of 10 posts that will give insight into both the philosophical reasons and the concrete effects of reaching out to others with a personal approach.  

If you missed Part 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5, read them here.

Sharing

The morality that arises from face-to-face interactions, combined with the experience of inequalities, calls us to share. Openness to otherness leads both Levinas and Ricoeur to “not a moralism of abstract rules but an ethics of experience.”87 For Levinas, “The being that expresses itself imposes itself, but does so precisely by appealing to me with its destitution and nudity—its hunger—without my being able to be deaf to that appeal. Thus in expression the being that imposes itself does not limit but promotes my freedom, by arousing my goodness.”88 The other’s need calls me to a moral response. Yet despite the need, the other is equal with me. What is called for is not charity but sharing. Levinas explains, “The face in its nakedness as a face presents to me the destitution of the poor one and the stranger; but this poverty and exile which appeal to my powers, address me, do not deliver themselves over to these power as givens, remain the expression of the face. The poor one, the stranger, presents himself as an equal.”89

In this reciprocal relation, I am both less and more than the other person:

“To hear his destitution which cries out for justice is not to represent an image to oneself, but is to posit oneself as responsible, both as more and as less than the being that presents itself in the face. Less, for the face summons me to my obligations and judges me. The being that presents himself in the face comes from a dimension of height, a dimension of transcendence whereby he can present himself as a stranger without opposing me as obstacle or enemy. More, for my position as I consist in being able to respond to this essential destitution of the Other, finding resources for myself. The Other who dominates me in his transcendence is thus the stranger, the widow, and the orphan, to whom I am obligated.”90

Finding an equal in need, and finding that I have the resources to respond, calls me to the responsibility to share those resources.

After living in Panecillo, Ecuador, I found that I had friends and new family members with goals and dreams I could very much relate to. And these friends often lacked the economic resources to achieve those goals and pursue those dreams. I also realized that I had economic resources at my disposal, and I wanted to share. The hard part was figuring out how to share in ways that did not belie the equality of the relationship. When I finally did begin to share, I made sure to emphasize the reciprocity involved and how much I had already received through the relationship, trying to make it clear that I was sharing, not giving in charity. Others involved with Tandana find themselves called to a similar kind of sharing. A family from the United States who lived with a family in Quichinche, Ecuador found themselves filled with gratitude for the welcome they had received and desired to share their resources in return, helping their host family install paving tiles in the courtyard, ordering a table and benches where all the members of both families could eat together, and assisting with other improvements to the house. A number of interns have been inspired by their host families’ generosity to want to share by providing scholarships to young people in their families. Short-term volunteers, also, have been called to share and have donated for medical treatments for patients they have met, educational materials for schools they have worked with, a tent for neighborhood meetings, and many other goals of community members they have met. One volunteer, after several trips to Kansongho, Mali, decided to share the tools he had inherited from this father and father-in-law with young men in Kansongho who were starting a carpentry workshop. Tandana as an organization also supports community initiatives in a spirit of sharing.

Moussa Tembiné, Tandana’s Mali Program Manager, explained, “The spirit of sharing, that is the spirit of Tandana. We know there are always difficulties, but if we are animated by this spirit, we know we will overcome the difficulties.”91 Sharing applies not only to material goods but also to knowledge, experiences, and cultures. Fabian Pinsag, president of Muenala Ecuador, said, “I think this is interculturality. Interculturality is not just in written words. It’s learning how to really share between different cultures.”92 Claudia Fuerez of Panecillo, Ecuador, highlighted the “intercultural sharing” that occurs with Tandana.93 Housseyni Pamateck, Tandana’s Local Supervisor in Mali, reported, “what really touches me is the cultural exchange between the different people, everyone wins.”94

Promise-keeping

The unpredictability of action and the moral obligations of face-to-face interaction call for keeping promises.95 Arendt argues, “The remedy for unpredictability, for the chaotic uncertainty of the future, is contained in the faculty to make and keep promises.”96 Ricoeur explains that the obligation to keep promises arises from the interaction with the other: “The properly ethical justification of the promise suffices of itself, a justification which can be derived from the obligation to safeguard the institution of language and to respond to the trust that the other places in my faithfulness.”97 Keeping promises not only responds to the other, it also provides an opportunity for self- constancy, which allows us to express who we are. Ricoeur explains, “Keeping one’s word expresses a self-constancy which cannot be inscribed, as character was, within the dimension of something in general but solely within the dimension of “who?”98 This self-constancy allows us to answer affirmatively the question, “Is there a form of permanence in time which can be connected to the question ‘who?’ inasmuch as it is irreducible to the question of ‘what?’? Is there a form of permanence in time that is a reply for the question ‘Who am I?’?”99

Keeping promises is important to Tandana’s approach. Tandana’s values statement includes, “We follow through on what we commit to do.”100 Community member are sometimes surprised to that find that Tandana actually follows through. Villagers in Sal-Dimi, Mali, despite Tandana’s promise of supporting them in creation of a grain bank, did not begin to break the stones needed for construction of the bank’s storehouse until they actually saw the grain arrive.

They had been betrayed by so many false promises in the past that they were not ready to invest in their part of the project until they knew that Tandana was going to follow through. Marcela Muenala from Tangali, Ecuador, whose son had successful surgery through Tandana’s Patient Follow Up Program, said, “Tandana is the only serious foundation that helps all the people in the communities, without lying to them. Others say they are going to help, to take us to good hospitals, and then they never return.”101 Keeping promises allows Tandana as an organization to maintain self-constancy. Tandana, even though it is an organization rather than an individual, maintains an identity as someone that its partners can count on.

Forgiveness

 

Action’s unpredictability and its need for freedom require the possibility of forgiveness. Arendt explains, “The possible redemption from the predicament of irreversibility— of being unable to undo what one has done though one did not, and could not, have known what he was doing—is the faculty of forgiving.”102 Since we can neither predict nor undo the effects of our actions, sometimes we need to ask for forgiveness. Granting forgiveness allows the forgiver to remain free to continue acting, rather than being caught in a determined cycle of retribution. Ricoeur argues:

What the catharsis of mourning-narrative allows is that new actions are still possible in spite of evil suffered. It detaches us from the obsessional repetitions and repressions of the past and frees us for a future. For only thus can we escape the disabling cycles of retribution, fate, and destiny: cycles which estrange us from our power to act by instilling the view that evil is overpoweringly alien—that is, irresistible.103

The act of forgiveness asserts that evil is not all-powerful and that we are free to act. Kearney explains that in Ricoeur’s thought, “the possibility of forgiveness is a ‘marvel’ precisely because it surpasses the limits of rational calculation and explanation. There is a certain gratuitousness about pardon due to the very fact that the evil it addresses is not part of some dialectical necessity.”104 Forgiveness safeguards our ability to act by providing a chance for redemption despite the negative effects of our actions and restoring our freedom to act rather than just react to evil we have suffered.

During my first stay in Mali, I experienced the marvel of forgiveness. I had heard about a cultural festival being presented for tourists, and, feeling lonely, I decided to attend despite my typical aversion to touristic settings. After I had arrived and sat down, however, I learned that there was an entrance fee. I did not really want to be there anyway, and I mumbled an embarrassed apology and intention to leave rather than pay the fee. I walked back to the borrowed scooter on which I had arrived and started the motor with my head down. Feeling awkward and regretful, I began driving slowly up the road, caught in my own thoughts. Suddenly, I noticed that a group of mask dancers was processing on the highway to the festival. The dancers on stilts were already right above, looking down at me, and other dancers swayed and shook at ground level. Unable to gather my wits to get out of the way, I drove right through the procession. A police officer pronounced official censure on my disrespectful deed, saying, “you are wrong.” Mortified, I frantically searched for a way to make up for my error. I could not undo my action, but perhaps I could ask for forgiveness. Knowing the importance of a third-party for any moral transaction in Malian culture, I asked an acquaintance to accompany me as I apologized. Together we returned to the festival, and I expressed my regret to the manager, whose name I learned was Modibo Iguila. I gave him a small sum of money as a token of my apology for my disrespect to the dancers and to the festival, feeling that nothing could really repair the damage I had done. To my great surprise, Modibo offered immediate forgiveness. He invited me to return to the festival each of the next days it would be held, and that evening he even showed up at the home where I was living with a gift of indigo cloth to cement our new friendship. The forgiveness that he offered so unexpectedly freed both of us to act again.

I have also had the opportunity to forgive and have found it to be as marvelous as being forgiven. After returning from a trip to Mali, I discovered that my closest Malian friend and my host to whom I had entrusted funds for a project had misrepresented the expenses to me. Although they had presented receipts to justify expenses of the total amount, they had separately created a spreadsheet revealing their projected expenses, including a small amount they intended to distribute to themselves without authorization, and accidentally shared it with me. I was devastated by their breach of trust, and, unable to resolve the issue through phone calls, planned another visit to Mali several months later in order to address the damage done to the relationships. When I was again face to face with my friend, he was able to express his regret and also explain their thinking, and I was able to forgive. Instead of ending the friendship, I decided to hire him as a representative of Tandana in Mali. Then he could earn something for his work honestly and did not need to take a hidden cut. Our relationship was ultimately repaired and strengthened, and we both were freed to act meaningfully again.

85 Smith, Emily Esfahani, The Power of Meaning: Finding Fulfillment in a World Obsessed with Happiness, (New York: Broadway Books, 2017), 85.

86 Ibid., 84.

87 Kearney, 112.

88 Levinas, 200.

89 Levinas, 213.

90 Ibid., 215.

91 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

92 Ibid.

93 Ibid.

94 Ibid.

95 Arrows 13 and 14 on the diagram.

96 Arendt, 237.

97 Ricoeur, 124.

98 Ibid., 123.

99 Ibid., 118.

100 The Tandana Foundation, “Mission & Values,” accessed May 28, 2018, http://tandanafoundation.org/mission_and_values.html

101 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

102 Arendt, 237.

103 Ricoeur, 96, emphases in original.

104 Kearney, 96-97.

Español

Compartir, Cumplimiento de promesas, Perdón: Parte 6

El proyecto de desarrollo como un intento de llevar a todas las sociedades “hacia adelante” a lo largo de un supuesto continuo, es injustificable. Y sin embargo, hay mucho trabajo importante por hacer que se parece mucho, e incluso se llama, “desarrollo”. Sin la teoría del desarrollo como marco guía, ¿por qué hacemos este trabajo? He tratado de explicar los fundamentos filosóficos del trabajo de Tandana, describiendo cómo conducen al trabajo que hacemos, pero más importante aún, a la forma en que hacemos este trabajo.

En una serie de publicaciones que encontrará aquí, ilustre cómo los principios en los que se basa Tandana se llevan a cabo en una aplicación concreta a través de discusiones sobre mis propias experiencias y las de los miembros de la comunidad y voluntarios que han trabajado con Tandana. Vemos cómo llegar a otros con un enfoque personal conduce, tanto en la teoría como en la práctica, a un mundo que es, de manera incremental, más pacífico y más justo. Este enfoque personal podría servir no solo como un impulso para el trabajo de una organización, sino también para transformar el carácter y los efectos de otros grupos que buscan una relación correcta con los demás. Este es el sexto de una serie de 10 publicaciones que dará una idea de las razones filosóficas y los efectos concretos de acercarse a los demás con un enfoque personal.

Si te perdiste la Parte 1, 2, 3, 4 y 5, léelas aquí.

Compartir

La moralidad que surge de las interacciones cara a cara, combinada con la experiencia de las desigualdades, nos llama a compartir. La apertura a la otredad lleva tanto a Levinas como a Ricoeur “no a un moralismo de reglas abstractas sino a una ética de la experiencia”. 87 Para Levinas, “el ser que se expresa se impone, pero lo hace precisamente apelando a mí con su destitución y desnudez. Su hambre, sin que yo pueda ser sordo a esa apelación. Así en expresión el ser que se impone no limita sino promueve mi libertad, al despertar mi bondad .88 La necesidad del otro me llama a una respuesta moral. Sin embargo, a pesar de la necesidad, el otro es igual a mí. Lo que se pide no es caridad sino compartir. Levinas explica: “El rostro en su desnudez como rostro me presenta la miseria del pobre y del extranjero; pero esta pobreza y el exilio que apelan a mis poderes, se dirigen a mí, no se entregan a estos poderes como dadas, siguen siendo la expresión de la cara. El pobre, el extraño, se presenta a sí mismo como un igual ”.89

En esta relación recíproca, soy menos y más que la otra persona:

Escuchar su destitución que clama por justicia no es representarse a sí mismo una imagen, sino postularse como responsable, tanto más como menos que el ser que se presenta en la cara. Menos, por la cara me convoca a mis obligaciones y me juzga. El ser que se presenta en la cara proviene de una dimensión de altura, una dimensión de trascendencia por la que puede presentarse como un extraño sin oponerme a mí como obstáculo o enemigo. Más aún, mi posición consiste en poder responder a esta destitución esencial del Otro, encontrando recursos para mí. El Otro que me domina en su trascendencia es, pues, el extraño, la viuda y el huérfano, a quien estoy obligado. ”90

Encontrar una necesidad igual y encontrar que tengo los recursos para responder, me llama a la responsabilidad de compartir esos recursos.

Después de vivir en Panecillo, Ecuador, descubrí que tenía amigos y nuevos miembros de la familia con metas y sueños con los que podía relacionarme. Y estos amigos a menudo carecían de los recursos económicos para alcanzar esos objetivos y perseguir esos sueños. También me di cuenta de que tenía recursos económicos a mi disposición y quería compartir. La parte difícil fue descubrir cómo compartir de una manera que no desmiente la igualdad de la relación. Cuando finalmente comencé a compartir, me aseguré de enfatizar la reciprocidad involucrada y la cantidad que ya había recibido a través de la relación, tratando de aclarar que estaba compartiendo, no cediendo en caridad. Otros involucrados con Tandana se encuentran llamados a compartir algo similar. Una familia de los Estados Unidos que vivía con una familia en Quichinche, Ecuador se sintió muy agradecida por la bienvenida que había recibido y deseaban compartir sus recursos a cambio, ayudando a su familia anfitriona a instalar pavimentos en el patio, construyendo una mesa y bancos donde todos los miembros de ambas familias podrían comer juntos, y ayudar con otras mejoras a la casa. Una cantidad de pasantes se ha inspirado en la generosidad de sus familias anfitrionas para querer compartir proveyendo becas a jóvenes en sus familias. Los voluntarios a corto plazo, también, han sido llamados para compartir y han donado para tratamientos médicos para los pacientes que han conocido, materiales educativos para las escuelas con las que han trabajado, una carpa para reuniones en el vecindario y muchos otros objetivos de los miembros de la comunidad que han conocido. Un voluntario, después de varios viajes a Kansongho, Mali, decidió compartir las herramientas que había heredado de este padre y suegro con hombres jóvenes en Kansongho que estaban comenzando un taller de carpintería. Tandana como organización también apoya las iniciativas comunitarias en un espíritu de compartir.

Moussa Tembiné, Gerente del Programa Malí de Tandana, explicó: “El espíritu de compartir, ese es el espíritu de Tandana. Sabemos que siempre hay dificultades, pero si este espíritu nos anima, sabemos que superaremos las dificultades”. 91 El intercambio se aplica no solo a los bienes materiales, sino también a los conocimientos, las experiencias y las culturas. Fabián Pinsag, presidente de Muenala Ecuador, dijo: “Creo que esto es interculturalidad. La interculturalidad no es solo en palabras escritas. Es aprender a compartir realmente entre diferentes culturas “. 92 Claudia Fuerez de Panecillo, Ecuador, destacó el “intercambio intercultural” que se produce con Tandana.93 Housseyni Pamateck, supervisora local de Tandana en Mali, informó: “lo que realmente me conmueve es el intercambio cultural entre las diferentes personas, todos ganan”. 94

Cumplimiento de promesas

La imprevisibilidad de la acción y las obligaciones morales de la interacción cara a cara exigen cumplir las promesas.95 Arendt argumenta: “El remedio para la imprevisibilidad, la incertidumbre caótica del futuro, está contenido en la facultad de hacer y cumplir promesas”. 96 Ricoeur explica que la obligación de cumplir las promesas surge de la interacción con el otro: “La justificación propiamente ética de la promesa basta de sí misma, una justificación que puede derivarse de la obligación de salvaguardar la institución del lenguaje y de responder a la verdad que los otros ponen en mi fidelidad “.97 Cumplir las promesas no solo responde al otro, sino que también brinda una oportunidad para la constancia, lo que nos permite expresar quiénes somos. Ricoeur explica: “Mantener la palabra de uno expresa una constancia de sí mismo que no puede ser inscrita, como era el carácter, dentro de la dimensión de algo en general, pero únicamente dentro de la dimensión de “quién? “98 Esta constancia de sí nos permite responder afirmativamente a la pregunta, “¿Existe una forma de permanencia en el tiempo que pueda relacionarse con la pregunta ‘¿quién?’, Ya que es irreductible a la pregunta de ‘¿qué?’? ¿Existe una forma de permanencia en el tiempo que sea una respuesta a la pregunta “¿Quién soy yo?” 99

Mantener las promesas es importante para el enfoque de Tandana. La declaración de valores de Tandana incluye: “Cumplimos con lo que nos comprometemos a hacer”.100 Miembros de la comunidad a veces se sorprenden al encontrar que Tandana realmente cumple. Los aldeanos de Sal-Dimi, Mali, a pesar de la promesa de Tandana de apoyarlos en la creación de un banco de granos, no comenzaron a romper las piedras necesarias para la construcción del almacén del banco hasta que realmente vieron llegar el grano.

Habían sido traicionados por tantas promesas falsas en el pasado que no estaban listos para invertir en su parte del proyecto hasta que supieron que Tandana iba a cumplir. Marcela Muenala, de Tangali, Ecuador, cuyo hijo tuvo una cirugía exitosa a través del Programa de Seguimiento de Pacientes de Tandana, dijo: “Tandana es la única fundación seria que ayuda a todas las personas de las comunidades, sin mentirles. Otros dicen que van a ayudar, a llevarnos a buenos hospitales, y luego nunca regresan”.101 Mantener las promesas permite a Tandana como organización mantener la constancia de sí misma. Tandana, aunque es una organización en lugar de un individuo, mantiene una identidad como alguien con quien sus socios pueden contar.

Perdón
La imprevisibilidad de la acción y su necesidad de libertad requieren la posibilidad de perdón. Arendt explica: “La posible redención de la dificultad de la irreversibilidad, de no poder deshacer lo que uno ha hecho, aunque uno no supo lo que estaba haciendo, es la facultad de perdonar”. 102 Como no podemos predecir ni deshacer los efectos de nuestras acciones, a veces necesitamos pedir perdón. Al otorgar el perdón, el perdón permanece libre para seguir actuando, en lugar de estar atrapado en un determinado ciclo de retribución. Ricoeur argumenta:

Lo que permite la catarsis de la narrativa de luto es que aún son posibles nuevas acciones a pesar del mal sufrido. Nos separa de las repeticiones y represiones obsesivas del pasado y nos libera para un futuro. Porque solo así podemos escapar de los ciclos incapacitantes de retribución, suerte y destino: ciclos que nos alejan de nuestro poder para actuar al inculcar la visión de que el mal es abrumadoramente extraño, es decir, irresistible. 103

El acto de perdón afirma que el mal no es todopoderoso y que somos libres de actuar. Kearney explica que, en el pensamiento de Ricoeur, “la posibilidad de perdón es una” maravilla “precisamente porque supera los límites del cálculo racional y la explicación. Hay un cierto grado de gratuidad en el perdón debido al hecho de que el mal al que se dirige no es parte de alguna necesidad dialéctica “. 104 El perdón protege nuestra capacidad de actuar al brindar una oportunidad de redención a pesar de los efectos negativos de nuestras acciones y de restaurar nuestra libertad Actuar en lugar de solo reaccionar ante el mal que hemos sufrido.

Durante mi primera estancia en Mali, experimenté la maravilla del perdón. Había oído hablar de un festival cultural que se presentaba para los turistas y, sintiéndome solo, decidí asistir a pesar de mi aversión típica a los entornos turísticos. Después de que llegué y me senté, sin embargo, supe que había una tarifa de entrada. No quería estar allí de todos modos, y murmuré una disculpa avergonzada y la intención de irme en lugar de pagar la tarifa. Caminé de regreso a la scooter prestada en la que había llegado y puse en marcha el motor con la cabeza hacia abajo. Sintiéndome incómodo y arrepentido, comencé a conducir lentamente por la carretera, atrapado en mis propios pensamientos. De repente, noté que un grupo de bailarines de máscaras estaba caminando en la carretera hacia el festival. Los bailarines sobre pilotes ya estaban arriba, mirándome, y otros bailarines se tambalearon y temblaron al nivel del suelo. Incapaz de reunir ingenio para salir del camino, conduje a través de la procesión. Un oficial de policía pronunció una censura oficial en mi acto irrespetuoso, diciendo: “usted está equivocado”. Mortificado, busqué frenéticamente una manera de compensar mi error. No pude deshacer mi acción, pero tal vez podría pedir perdón. Sabiendo la importancia de un tercero para cualquier transacción moral en la cultura de Malí, le pedí a un conocido que me acompañara mientras me disculpaba. Juntos regresamos al festival y expresé mi pesar al gerente, cuyo nombre aprendí era Modibo Iguila. Le di una pequeña suma de dinero como muestra de mis disculpas por mi falta de respeto a los bailarines y al festival, sintiendo que nada podía reparar realmente el daño que había hecho. Para mi gran sorpresa, Modibo ofreció perdón inmediato. Me invitó a regresar al festival cada uno de los próximos días que se celebraría, y esa noche incluso se presentó en la casa donde vivía con un regalo de tela índigo para consolidar nuestra nueva amistad. El perdón que ofreció tan inesperadamente nos liberó a los dos para actuar de nuevo.

También he tenido la oportunidad de perdonar y he encontrado que es tan maravilloso como ser perdonado. Después de regresar de un viaje a Mali, descubrí que mi amigo más cercano de Malí y mi anfitrión a quien le había confiado fondos para un proyecto me habían tergiversado los gastos. Aunque habían presentado recibos para justificar los gastos de la cantidad total, habían creado una hoja de cálculo por separado que revelaba sus gastos proyectados, incluida una pequeña cantidad que tenían la intención de distribuirse sin autorización, y la compartieron accidentalmente conmigo. Me sentí devastado por su abuso de confianza y, al no poder resolver el problema a través de llamadas telefónicas, planeé otra visita a Mali varios meses más tarde para abordar el daño causado a las relaciones. Cuando volví a estar cara a cara con mi amigo, él pudo expresar su pesar y también explicar su pensamiento, y pude perdonar. En lugar de poner fin a la amistad, decidí contratarlo como representante de Tandana en Mali. Entonces él podía ganar algo por su trabajo de manera honesta y no necesitaba tomar un corte oculto. Nuestra relación finalmente fue reparada y fortalecida, y ambos fuimos liberados para actuar de manera significativa nuevamente.

85 Smith, Emily Esfahani, The Power of Meaning: Finding Fulfillment in a World Obsessed with Happiness, (New York: Broadway Books, 2017), 85.

86 Ibid., 84.

87 Kearney, 112.

88 Levinas, 200.

89 Levinas, 213.

90 Ibid., 215.

91 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

92 Ibid.

93 Ibid.

94 Ibid.

95 Arrows 13 and 14 on the diagram.

96 Arendt, 237.

97 Ricoeur, 124.

98 Ibid., 123.

99 Ibid., 118.

100 The Tandana Foundation, “Mission & Values,” accessed May 28, 2018, http://tandanafoundation.org/mission_and_values.html

101 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

102 Arendt, 237.

103 Ricoeur, 96, emphases in original.

104 Kearney, 96-97.

Français

Partager, Réalisation des promesses, Pardon: Partie 6

Le projet de développement comme tentative de «faire avancer» toutes les sociétés dans un continuum supposé est injustifiable. Et pourtant, il y a beaucoup de travail important à faire qui ressemble beaucoup au “développement”. Sans théorie du développement comme cadre directeur, pourquoi faisons-nous ce travail? J’ai essayé d’expliquer les fondements philosophiques du travail de Tandana, en décrivant comment ils conduisaient au travail que nous faisons, mais surtout, à la façon dont nous faisons ce travail.

Dans une série d’articles que vous trouverez ici, j’illustrerai comment les principes sur lesquels Tandana est fondée se concrétisent par des discussions sur mes propres expériences ainsi que sur celles de membres de la communauté et de bénévoles qui ont travaillé avec Tandana. Nous voyons comment le fait de s’approcher aux autres avec une approche personnelle conduit, à la fois en théorie et en pratique, à un monde de plus en plus pacifique et plus juste. Cette approche personnelle pourrait non seulement servir d’élan au travail d’une organisation, mais aussi transformer le caractère et les effets d’autres groupes à la recherche de bonnes relations avec les autres. Il s’agit de la seconde d’une série de 10 publications qui donneront un aperçu à la fois des raisons philosophiques et des effets concrets de la prise de contact avec une approche personnelle.

Si vous avez manqué la Partie 1, 2, 3, 4 et 5, lisez-la ici.

Partager

La moralité qui émerge des interactions face à face, combinée à l’expérience des inégalités, nous appelle à partager. L’ouverture à l’autre conduit à la fois Lévinas et Ricoeur “non à un moralisme de règles abstraites, mais à une éthique de l’expérience”. 87 Pour Lévinas, “l’être qui s’exprime s’impose, mais il le fait précisément en m’appelant avec son dénuement et sa nudité, sa faim, sans que je puisse être sourd à cet appel. Ainsi, dans l’expression, l’être qui est imposé ne limite pas mais plutôt favorise ma liberté en éveillant ma bonté “.88 Le besoin de l’autre m’appelle à une réponse morale. Cependant, malgré le besoin, l’autre est égal à moi. Ce qui est demandé n’est pas la charité mais le partage. Lévinas explique: “Le visage dans sa nudité comme un visage me présente la misère des pauvres et de l’étranger; mais cette pauvreté et cet exil qui font appel à mes pouvoirs me sont adressés, ne vous abandonnez pas à ces pouvoirs tels qu’ils sont donnés, ils sont toujours l’expression du visage. Le pauvre, l’étranger, se présente comme un égal ».89

Dans cette relation réciproque Je suis moins et plus que l’autre personne :

Écouter son congédiement qui appelle à la justice ne signifie pas se représenter lui-même en tant qu’image, mais se postuler en tant que responsable, autant que moins que l’être qui apparaît en face. Moins, en apparence, cela me rappelle mes obligations et me juge. L’être qui apparaît sur le visage provient d’une dimension de hauteur, d’une dimension de transcendance par laquelle il peut apparaître comme un étranger sans m’opposer comme un obstacle ou un ennemi. De plus, ma position est de pouvoir répondre à cette destitution essentielle de l’Autre en me trouvant des ressources. L’Autre qui me domine dans sa transcendance est donc l’étranger, la veuve et l’orphelin auquel je suis lié.”90

Trouver un besoin égal et constater que je dispose des ressources nécessaires pour y répondre m’appelle à la responsabilité de les partager.

Après avoir vécu à Panecillo, en Équateur, j’ai découvert que j’avais des amis et de nouveaux membres de la famille avec des objectifs et des rêves que je pouvais comprendre. Et ces amis manquaient souvent des ressources économiques pour atteindre ces objectifs et poursuivre leurs rêves. Je me suis aussi rendu compte que j’avais des ressources financières à ma disposition et que je voulais partager. La partie difficile a été de découvrir comment partager d’une manière qui ne minimise pas l’égalité de la relation. Quand j’ai finalement commencé à partager, je me suis assuré d’insister sur la réciprocité et sur le montant que j’avais déjà reçu grâce à la relation, en essayant de clarifier que Je partageais, ne donnais pas dans la charité. Les autres personnes impliquées dans Tandana sont appelées à partager quelque chose de similaire. Une famille des États-Unis qu’habitait avec une famille à Quichinche, en Équateur, était très reconnaissante de l’accueil qu’elle avait reçu et souhaitait partager ses ressources, aidant sa famille d’accueil à installer des trottoirs dans le patio, construisant une table et des bancs où tous les membres des deux familles pourraient manger ensemble et aider à d’autres améliorations de la maison. Un certain nombre de stagiaires ont été inspirés par la générosité de leurs familles d’accueil de vouloir partager en offrant des bourses aux jeunes de leurs familles. Des volontaires à court terme ont également été appelés à partager et à faire des dons pour le traitement médical des patients qu’ils ont rencontrés, du matériel pédagogique pour les écoles avec lesquelles ils ont travaillé, une tente pour des réunions de quartier et de nombreux autres objectifs du projet de membres de la communauté qu’ils ont rencontrés. Après plusieurs voyages à Kansongho, au Mali, un volontaire a décidé de partager les outils hérités de son père et de son beau-père avec des jeunes hommes de Kansongho qui commençaient un atelier de menuiserie. Tandana en tant qu’organisation soutient également les initiatives communautaires dans un esprit de partage.

Moussa Tembiné, responsable du programme Mali Tandana, a expliqué: “L’esprit de partage, c’est l’esprit de Tandana, nous savons qu’il y a toujours des difficultés, mais si cet esprit nous encourage, nous savons que nous surmonterons les difficultés”.91 L’échange s’applique non seulement aux biens matériels, mais également aux connaissances, aux expériences et aux cultures. Fabián Pinsag, président de Muenala Equateur, a déclaré: “Je pense que c’est interculturel. L’interculturalité n’est pas seulement écrite. C’est apprendre à vraiment partager entre différentes cultures. “92 Claudia Fuerez de Panecillo, Équateur,

Housseyni Pamateck, superviseur local de Tandana au Mali, a déclaré: “Ce qui m’émeut vraiment, c’est l’échange culturel entre différentes personnes, tout le monde gagne”. 94

Réalisation des promesses

L’imprévisibilité de l’action et les obligations morales de l’interaction face à face exigent le respect des promesses.95 Arendt affirme: “Le remède à l’imprévisibilité, l’incertitude chaotique de l’avenir, est contenu dans la capacité de faire et de remplir les promesses”. 96 Ricoeur explique que l’obligation de respecter les promesses découle de l’interaction avec l’autre: “La justification de la promesse elle-même est assez éthique, justification qui peut être tirée de l’obligation de sauvegarder l’institution du langage et de répondre aux vérité que les autres ont mis dans ma fidélité “. 97 Tenir ses promesses répond non seulement à l’autre, mais offre également une possibilité de persévérance, ce qui nous permet d’exprimer qui nous sommes. Ricoeur explique: “Garder sa parole exprime une constance de soi qui ne peut pas être inscrite, comme le personnage, dans la dimension de quelque chose en général, mais uniquement dans la dimension de « qui? » 98 Cette constance du oui, nous permet de répondre affirmativement à la question “Existe-t-il une forme de permanence dans le temps pouvant être liée à la question” qui? “, Puisqu’il est irréductible à la question” quoi? “? Existe-t-il une forme de permanence dans le temps qui réponde à la question « qui suis-je? » 99

Tenir les promesses est important pour l’approche de Tandana. La déclaration de valeurs de Tandana comprend: « Nous nous conformons à ce que nous promettons de faire ». 100 Membres de la communauté sont parfois surpris de constater que Tandana est vraiment épanouissante. Les villageois de Sal-Dimi, au Mali, malgré la promesse de Tandana de les aider à créer une banque de céréales, n’ont pas commencé à casser les pierres nécessaires pour la construction de l’entrepôt de la banque jusqu’à ce qu’ils aient réellement vu les céréales arriver.

Ils avaient été trahis par tant de fausses promesses dans le passé qu’ils n’étaient pas prêts à investir dans leur part du projet jusqu’à ce qu’ils sachent que Tandana allait se conformer. Marcela Muenala, de Tangali, en Équateur, dont le fils a été opéré avec succès dans le cadre du programme de suivi des patients Tandana, a déclaré: « Tandana est la seule fondation sérieuse qui aide tous les habitants des communautés sans leur mentir. D’autres disent qu’ils vont nous aider, nous emmener dans de bons hôpitaux et ne jamais revenir. »101 Tenir ses promesses permet à Tandana, en tant qu’organisation, de maintenir sa cohérence. Tandana, bien qu’il s’agisse d’une organisation plutôt que d’un particulier, conserve une identité de personne avec laquelle ses partenaires peuvent compter.

Pardon

L’imprévisibilité de l’action et son besoin de liberté exigent la possibilité d’un pardon. Arendt explique: « La rédemption possible de la difficulté de l’irréversibilité, de ne pas pouvoir annuler ce que l’on a fait, même si on ne savait pas ce qu’on faisait, est la faculté du pardon ». 102 Puisque nous ne pouvons ni prédire ni annuler les effets de nos actions, nous devons parfois demander pardon. En accordant le pardon, le pardon reste libre de continuer à agir, au lieu d’être pris dans un certain cycle de rétribution.

Ricoeur soutient:
Ce qui permet la catharsis du récit de deuil, c’est que de nouvelles actions sont encore possibles malgré le mal subi. Il nous sépare des répétitions et des répressions obsessionnelles du passé et nous libère pour un avenir. C’est seulement ainsi que nous pourrons échapper aux cycles incapacitants de rétribution, de chance et de destin: des cycles qui nous éloignent de notre pouvoir d’agir en inculquant la vision que le mal est extrêmement étrange, c’est-à-dire irrésistible. 103

L’acte de pardon affirme que le mal n’est pas tout-puissant et que nous sommes libres d’agir. Kearney explique que, selon Ricoeur, « la possibilité d’un pardon est un » miracle « précisément parce qu’elle dépasse les limites du calcul et de l’explication rationnels. Il y a un certain degré de gratuité dans le pardon du au fait que le mal auquel il est destiné ne fait pas partie d’un besoin dialectique . » 104 Le pardon protège notre capacité à agir en offrant une occasion de rédemption malgré les effets négatifs de nos actions et en restaurant notre liberté. Agissez au lieu de réagir au mal que nous avons subi.

Lors de mon premier séjour au Mali, j’ai expérimenté les merveilles du pardon. J’avais entendu parler d’un festival culturel présenté aux touristes et, me sentant seul, j’ai décidé d’y assister malgré mon aversion pour les environnements touristiques typiques. Cependant, après mon arrivée et mon siège, je savais qu’il y avait un droit d’entrée. . De toute façon, je ne voulais pas être là et j’ai murmuré des excuses embarrassées et je voulais partir au lieu de payer le droit. Je suis retourné au scooter emprunté par lequel j’étais arrivé et j’ai démarré le moteur avec la tête baissée. Mal à l’aise et avec regret, j’ai commencé à conduire lentement sur la route, pris au piège de mes propres pensées. Soudain, j’ai remarqué qu’un groupe de danseurs masqués marchait sur la route menant au festival. Les danseuses sur pilotis étaient déjà debout et me regardaient. D’autres danseuses tremblaient au ras du sol. Incapable de rassemblant l’esprit pour sortir du chemin, j’ai conduit à travers la procession. Un officier de police a prononcé une censure officielle dans mon acte irrespectueux, en disant: “Vous avez tort”.

Mortifié, je cherchai frénétiquement un moyen de réparer mon erreur. Je ne pouvais pas annuler mon action, mais je pourrais peut-être demander pardon. Connaissant l’importance d’une tierce partie pour toute transaction morale dans la culture malienne, j’ai demandé à un connu de m’accompagner pendant que je m’excusais. Ensemble, nous sommes retournés au festival et j’ai exprimé mes regrets au responsable, dont j’ai appris le nom qui était Modibo Iguila. J’ai donné une petite somme d’argent en come excuse pour mon manque de respect aux danseurs du festival, estimant que rien ne pouvait réparer les dommages que j’avais causés. À ma grande surprise, Modibo a immédiatement offert son pardon. Il m’a invité à revenir au festival chaque jour qui allait être célébré, et cette nuit-là, il s’est même présenté à la maison où il vivait avec un cadeau d’étoffe indigo pour consolider notre nouvelle amitié. Le pardon qu’il a offert de manière inattendue nous a libérés pour pouvoir agir à nouveau.

J’ai également eu l’occasion de pardonner et j’ai trouvé que c’était aussi merveilleux que d’être pardonné. À mon retour d’un voyage au Mali, j’ai découvert que mon ami le plus proche du Mali et mon hôte à qui j’avais confié des fonds pour un projet avaient présenté de manière erronée mes dépenses. Bien qu’ils aient soumis des reçus pour justifier les dépenses du montant total, ils avaient créé un tableur séparé qui révélait leurs dépenses prévisionnelles, y compris un petit montant qu’ils avaient l’intention de distribuer sans autorisation, et les partagèrent accidentellement avec moi. Je me suis senti dévasté par leur abus de confiance et, incapable de résoudre le problème par des appels téléphoniques, j’ai planifié une autre visite au Mali plus tard pour réparer les dommages causés aux relations. Quand j’etais de nouveau face à face avec mon ami, il a pu exprimer son regret et également expliquer ses pensées, et je pourrais pardonner au lieu de mettre fin à l’amitié, j’ai décidé de l’embaucher en tant que représentant de Tandana au Mali. Ensuite, il pourrait honnêtement gagner quelque chose en échange de son travail et il n’avait pas besoin de cacher de l’argent. Notre relation a finalement été réparée et renforcée, et nous avons tous deux été libérés pour agir de manière significative.

85 Smith, Emily Esfahani, The Power of Meaning: Finding Fulfillment in a World Obsessed with Happiness, (New York: Broadway Books, 2017), 85.

86 Ibid., 84.

87 Kearney, 112.

88 Levinas, 200.

89 Levinas, 213.

90 Ibid., 215.

91 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

92 Ibid.

93 Ibid.

94 Ibid.

95 Arrows 13 and 14 on the diagram.

96 Arendt, 237.

97 Ricoeur, 124.

98 Ibid., 123.

99 Ibid., 118.

100 The Tandana Foundation, “Mission & Values,” accessed May 28, 2018, http://tandanafoundation.org/mission_and_values.html

101 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

102 Arendt, 237.

103 Ricoeur, 96, emphases in original.

104 Kearney, 96-97.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s