Live Encounters and Experiencing Difference: Part 4

The development project as an attempt to bring all societies “forward,” along a supposed continuum, is unjustifiable.  And yet there is much important work to be done that looks very much like, and is even called, “development.”  Without development theory as a guiding framework, why do we do this work?  I have tried to explain the philosophical underpinnings for Tandana’s work, describing how they led to the work we do, but even more importantly, to the way in which we do this work. 

Español

Français

In a series of posts you will find here, I illustrate how the principles on which Tandana is founded play out in concrete application through discussions of my own experiences as well as those of community members and volunteers who have worked with Tandana.  We see how reaching out to others with a personal approach leads, both in theory and in practice, to a world that is, incrementally, more peaceful and more just.  This personal approach could serve not only as impetus for one organization’s work but also to transform the character and effects of other groups seeking right relationship with others.  This is the third in a series of 10 posts that will give insight into both the philosophical reasons and the concrete effects of reaching out to others with a personal approach.  

If you missed Part 1, 2 or 3, read them here.

Live Encounters

When we take a personal perspective toward others, maintaining our plurality, and combine that with a willingness to reach out to those who are different, we can have what Parker Palmer calls “live encounters.”45 “In every action,” he explains, “there is an other with which the actor is in partnership and on which the action in part depends.”46 Yet we often try to avoid acknowledging the other or to contain the other within the familiar. Palmer describes the fears that often prevent us from engaging in live encounters. He argues that, “The fear of the live encounter is actually a sequence of fears that begins in the fear of diversity” and that another layer of fear is “the fear of losing our identity.”47 As Palmer notes, “We fear encounters in which the other is free to be itself, to speak its own truth, to tell us what we may not wish to hear. We want those encounters on our own terms, so that we can control their outcomes.”48 However, as Mehta notes:

To contain those differences [that separate and potentially unite us] or to mediate them through a prior settlement that fixes on reason, freedom, ethics, internationalism, multiculturalism, the universality of rights, or even democracy, is to deny “the occult,” “the parochial,” “the traditional,” in short the unfamiliar, the very possibility of articulating the meaning and agentiality of its own experiences.49

When we actually do keep both our own identity and those of others intact, and take the risk of addressing those who are different, seeking a “rightful relation,” then we experience “what the ‘live encounter’ of right action is all about—an encounter between the inward truth of the actor and the inward truth of the other that penetrates all external appearances and expectations.”50

Dialogue, which is the mode of speech that arises most naturally from a first- person orientation toward others, has the power to overcome our efforts to control the encounter. Levinas explains: “In discourse the divergence that inevitably opens up between the Other as my theme and the Other as my interlocutor, emancipated from the theme that seemed for a moment to hold him, forthwith contests the meaning I ascribe to my interlocutor. The formal structure of language thereby announces the ethical inviolability of the Other.”51 In a live encounter, difference is not contained, and an interaction leads to that which is new and unexpected. Mehta also highlights the risks, including, “the possibility of being confronted with utter opacity–an intransigent strangeness, an unfamiliarity that remains so, an experience that cannot be shared, prejudices that do not readily fuse with a cosmopolitan horizon, a difference that cannot be assimilated.”52 As Palmer points out, there is always the possibility “that a live encounter with otherness will challenge or even compel us to change our lives. . . . Otherness, taken seriously, always invites transformation, calling us not only to new facts and theories and values but also to a new way of living our lives.”53 We may have to rework and revise our beliefs and even our practices, based on the experience of the encounter. By entering into a live encounter, we allow the other to express herself and cut through the image we have of her. When she can expose her otherness, the results are unpredictable and may cause us to change our actions. This dynamic interaction is what makes the encounter “live.”

Live encounters occur frequently in Tandana’s work. My first stay in Ecuador was an extended encounter with people I had never met but who came to be family and friends. I never would have expected that twenty years later I would be leading an organization that works in the same community and visiting twice a year. Through the encounter, I found that I was in relationships in which I had responsibilities. The way I would live my life was profoundly changed. In Tandana’s work, each project is undertaken through interaction between Tandana and a community or organization. The process is open-ended and the outcome is not predetermined. When community members and volunteers meet, there are also many opportunities for unexpected learning. When Tandana first brought a group of foreign volunteers to the village of Kansongho, Mali, not much went according to plan. Work schedules changed, the grain bank storehouse that residents and visitors were building together collapsed, and new invitations and gifts were offered each day. Through this live encounter, everyone involved learned and changed in some way. Thirteen-year-old volunteer Mick Lundquist wrote, “It opened my eyes and heart. It changed my look at the world and will change the way I live.”54

Mick Lundquist (left)

Dick Brigden, a volunteer in his late sixties, said he would tell others considering such a trip, “Go with an open mind and open heart and both will be touched and you will have an opportunity to touch others.”55

Dick Brigden (right)

Tandana Program Coordinator Shannon Ongaro reflected after this encounter, “the world has changed since [I] last wrote. [I] confess that [I] too have changed. [I]’d like to think that each one of us is in a constant flux, a state where we are open to experiences and are thereby changed and improved because of them.”56

Shannon Ongaro (right)

Community leaders also expressed learning and the shattering of expectations. Moussa Tembiné and Timothée Dolo wrote:

The children still do the dance that you showed them in the village and in the fields; that really made an impression on the men, women, young people, and children. Be thanked for all of that. The women invite you to go out to look for firewood at the pink dune. The people are asking when will be the next visit of the group. As to the township, she has never seen white people come and work like you have done in your visit to Kansongho.57

Even after many years of collaboration, there continue to be surprises that break through appearances and expectations. Tandana’s Scholarship Coordinator learned, to her great surprise, that a model student who had been receiving a Tandana scholarship to medical college for four years was not actually living in the apartment for which Tandana was paying her rent. During Tandana’s twelfth year, the community of Motilon Chupa, Ecuador suddenly became a very enthusiastic partner, inviting Tandana volunteer groups to stay in their community and cooking all of their favorite meals to share with the visitors. And as new staff members and volunteers arrive, there are new live encounters. Intern Hailey Shanovich wrote:

Even though Tandana sent me an extensive internship manual and I underwent an orientation upon arriving in Otavalo, I wasn’t prepared for what awaited me in my host community. The amount of warmth my new family greeted me with and the greater amount of good-will and optimism that they held was emotionally overwhelming for me and we continued to become close at a rate I had previously thought impossible.58

Hailey Shanovich (left)

Matias Perugachi, a long-time friend and partner of Tandana from Panecillo, Ecuador, appreciates the live nature of these interactions. Explaining that “Tandana is to unite together, be together, struggle together,” he argues that, “Tandana is not a sleeping word or a dead word. It is a living word.”59

Experiencing Difference

Reaching out to communities of different cultures, economic situations, and lifestyles causes us to experience inequalities and difference.60 Knowing about different ways of life and seeing representations of them are quite different from actually experiencing them. Similarly, knowledge of economic inequalities is not the same as experiencing what it is like to live in a very different economic situation than one’s own. When I traveled to Kenya as a teenager, I had the opportunity to experience both great cultural difference and vast economic inequalities in close proximity to me. I felt uncomfortable with my relationship as tourist to the people I met whose lives were so different from mine. Because of that experience, I resolved to find a way to develop a relationship that felt more appropriate with people who were very different from me. This desire led me to sign up for a volunteer program in Ecuador, where I began to form the relationships that led to Tandana. Tandana volunteers and interns continue to experience these differences first-hand. Hailey Shanovich wrote of her internship with Tandana, “It allowed me to be able to see myself as part of the whole global picture and recognize that opportunities for global citizens are far from equal within and between societies.”61 Canadian volunteer Rebecca Lewinson wrote of her experience:

It has opened my eyes to a new world, new cultures, and new perspectives on family, friends, and how others are treated. In this past week, I have seen first- hand how hard people will work to persevere, even in the hardest conditions. I have seen people who work all day, only to return home and work more to be able to support their families, and I have seen people who have very little donate as much as they can to the Tandana volunteers who came to help them.62

Rebecca (far left) working at the medical scribe during the Health Care Volunteer Vacation

U.S. volunteer Jessica Morales described her visit to an Afro-Ecuadorian community:

It’s easy to read about painful history, but it’s different when it comes directly from someone talking about their experiences and identity because of that history. It was eye opening for me and it makes me mad to think that so many Afro- Latinos in general get ignored in the media, are made out to be less, and are discriminated by their own people. . . . . It made me realize that Ecuador is made up of different and diverse individuals, with groups that have their own separate traditions and ways of life.63

Jessica (center) and other TSC volunteers dressed in traditional Ecuadorian clothing for a celebration in Tangali on their last day in the community

She also remembered her experience living in an indigenous community immersing her in a different situation from what she was used to:

Not only did I get to interact with people like me, that don’t struggle as much to drink a glass of milk or eat a full meal, I also interacted with people that despite how little they have, they’re willing to give. You forget about people like that when you’re used to privileged surroundings. You also forget about those surroundings when you become used to walking and taking the bus everywhere, being greeted in the street, having a nice conversation with a man or woman you just met; these are the interactions that I long for, and hope to experience more of. A willingness to reach out to those whose lives are different makes possible these experiences of cultural difference and economic inequality.

45 Arrows 3 and 4 on the diagram.

46 Palmer, The Active Life, 69.

47 Palmer, Parker J., The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life, Tenth Anniversary Edition (San Francisco: Jossey Bass, 2007), 38.

48 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 37-38.

49 Mehta, 23.

50 Palmer, The Active Life, 71.

51 Levinas, 195.

52 Mehta, 22.

53 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 39.

54 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

55 Ibid.

56 Ongaro, Shannon, “yalema-palooza 2009” in the arts foundry, February 2, 2009 (http://theartsfoundry.blogspot.com/2009/02/yalema-palooza-2009.html).

57 Ibid.

58 Shanovich, Hailey, “An Intern Reflects on Global Citizenship,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog, February 23, 2016 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2016/02/23/an-intern-reflects-on-global- citizenship/).

59 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html 

60 Arrow 5 on the diagram.

61 Shanovich.

62 Lewinson, Rebecca, “Health Care Volunteer Vacation in Ecuador Opens a Participant’s Eyes,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog, April 4, 2017 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2017/04/21/health-care-volunteer-vacation-in-ecuador- opens-a-volunteers-eyes/#more-2342).

63 Morales, Jessica, “Volunteer Wants to Have a Home Everywhere She Goes After Tandana Experience” in The Tandana Foundation Blog, November 1, 2016 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/volunteer-wants-to-have-a-home-everywhere- she-goes-after-tandana-experience/).

Español

Encuentros en vivo y Experimentando la diferencia: Parte 4

El proyecto de desarrollo como un intento de llevar a todas las sociedades “hacia adelante” a lo largo de un supuesto continuo, es injustificable. Y sin embargo, hay mucho trabajo importante por hacer que se parece mucho, e incluso se llama, “desarrollo”. Sin la teoría del desarrollo como marco guía, ¿por qué hacemos este trabajo? He tratado de explicar los fundamentos filosóficos del trabajo de Tandana, describiendo cómo conducen al trabajo que hacemos, pero más importante aún, a la forma en que hacemos este trabajo.

En una serie de publicaciones que encontrará aquí, ilustre cómo los principios en los que se basa Tandana se llevan a cabo en una aplicación concreta a través de discusiones sobre mis propias experiencias y las de los miembros de la comunidad y voluntarios que han trabajado con Tandana. Vemos cómo llegar a otros con un enfoque personal conduce, tanto en la teoría como en la práctica, a un mundo que es, de manera incremental, más pacífico y más justo. Este enfoque personal podría servir no solo como un impulso para el trabajo de una organización, sino también para transformar el carácter y los efectos de otros grupos que buscan una relación correcta con los demás. Este es el segundo de una serie de 10 publicaciones que dará una idea de las razones filosóficas y los efectos concretos de acercarse a los demás con un enfoque personal.

Si te perdiste la Parte 1, 2 y 3, léelas aquí.

Encuentros en vivo

Cuando tomamos una perspectiva personal hacia otros, manteniendo nuestra pluralidad y combinando eso con la voluntad de acercarnos a aquellos que son diferentes, podemos tener lo que Parker Palmer llama “encuentros en vivo”. 45 “En cada acción”, explica, “Hay otro con el que el actor está asociado y del que la acción depende en parte.”46 Sin embargo, a menudo tratamos de evitar reconocer al otro o contener al otro dentro de lo familiar. Palmer describe los miedos que a menudo nos impiden participar en encuentros en vivo. Él argumenta que, “El miedo al encuentro en vivo es en realidad una secuencia de miedos que comienza con el miedo a la diversidad” y que otra capa de miedo es “el miedo a perder nuestra identidad.”47 Como señala Palmer, “Tememos los encuentros” en el que el otro es libre de ser él mismo, de decir su propia verdad, de decirnos lo que no deseamos oír. Queremos esos encuentros en nuestros propios términos, para que podamos controlar sus resultados.”48 Sin embargo, como señala Mehta:

Contener esas diferencias [que nos separan y potencialmente nos unen] o mediarlas a través de un acuerdo previo que se basa en la razón, la libertad, la ética, el internacionalismo, el multiculturalismo, la universalidad de los derechos o incluso la democracia, es negar “lo oculto” “Lo parroquial”, “lo tradicional”, en resumen, lo desconocido, la posibilidad misma de articular el significado y la edad de sus propias experiencias.49

Cuando realmente mantenemos intacta nuestra propia identidad y la de los demás, y corremos el riesgo de dirigirnos a los que son diferentes, buscando una “relación legítima”, entonces experimentamos “de qué se trata el ‘encuentro en vivo’ de la acción correcta- un encuentro entre la verdad interna del actor y la verdad interna del otro que penetra en todas las apariencias y expectativas externas.”50

El diálogo, que es el modo de hablar que surge más naturalmente desde una orientación en primera persona hacia los demás, tiene el poder de superar nuestros esfuerzos para controlar el encuentro. Levinas explica: “En el discurso, la divergencia que inevitablemente se abre entre el Otro como mi tema y el Otro como mi interlocutor, emancipado del tema que pareció por un momento sostenerlo, inmediatamente impugna el significado que atribuyo a mi interlocutor. La estructura formal del lenguaje anuncia la inviolabilidad ética del Otro.”51 En un encuentro en vivo, la diferencia no se contiene, y una interacción conduce a lo nuevo e inesperado. Mehta también destaca los riesgos, incluida la “posibilidad de enfrentarse a la opacidad total: una extrañeza intransigente, un desconocimiento que permanece así, una experiencia que no se puede compartir, prejuicios que no se fusionan fácilmente con un horizonte cosmopolita, una diferencia que no se puede asimilar.”52 Como Palmer señala, siempre existe la posibilidad de que “un encuentro en vivo con la alteridad nos desafíe o incluso nos obligue a cambiar nuestras vidas”. . . . La alteridad, tomada en serio, siempre invita a la transformación, llamándonos no solo a nuevos hechos y teorías y valores, sino también a una nueva forma de vivir nuestras vidas.”53 Es posible que tengamos que volver a trabajar y revisar nuestras creencias e incluso nuestras prácticas, basadas en la experiencia del encuentro. Al participar en un encuentro en vivo, permitimos que el otro se exprese y corte la imagen que tenemos de ella. Cuando puede exponer su otredad, los resultados son impredecibles y pueden hacer que cambiemos nuestras acciones. Esta interacción dinámica es lo que hace que el encuentro sea “en vivo”.

Los encuentros en vivo ocurren frecuentemente en el trabajo de Tandana. Mi primera estadía en Ecuador fue un encuentro prolongado con personas que nunca había conocido, pero que llegaron a ser familiares y amigos. Nunca hubiera esperado que, veinte años después, lideraría una organización que trabaja en la misma comunidad y que visita dos veces al año. A través del encuentro, descubrí que estaba en relaciones en las cuales tenía responsabilidades. La forma en que viviría mi vida cambió profundamente. En el trabajo de Tandana, cada proyecto se lleva a cabo a través de la interacción entre Tandana y una comunidad u organización. El proceso es abierto y el resultado no está predeterminado. Cuando los miembros de la comunidad y los voluntarios se reúnen, también hay muchas oportunidades para el aprendizaje inesperado. Cuando Tandana trajo por primera vez un grupo de voluntarios extranjeros a la aldea de Kansongho, Malí, no salió mucho de acuerdo con el plan. Los horarios de trabajo cambiaron, el depósito del banco de granos que los residentes y visitantes estaban construyendo juntos colapsó, y nuevas invitaciones y obsequios se ofrecían cada día. A través de este encuentro en vivo, todos los involucrados aprendieron y cambiaron de alguna manera. El voluntario de trece años Mick Lundquist escribió: “Me abrió los ojos y el corazón. Cambió mi mirada al mundo y cambiará la forma en que vivo.”54

Mick Lundquish (izquerida)

Dick Brigden, un voluntario de alrededor de 60 años, dijo que les diría a otros considerando un viaje así: “Ve con la mente abierta y un corazón abierto, y ambos se verán afectados y tendrás la oportunidad de tocar a los demás.”55

Dick Brigden (derecha)

Tandana Coordinadora del programa Shannon Ongaro reflexionó después de este encuentro, “el mundo ha cambiado desde la última vez que escribí. [Yo] confieso que [yo] también he cambiado. [Me gustaría pensar que cada uno de nosotros está en un flujo constante, un estado en el que estamos abiertos a las experiencias y por lo tanto somos cambiados y mejorados por ellos.”56

Shannon Ongaro (derecha)

Los líderes comunitarios también expresaron el aprendizaje y la destrucción de las expectativas. Moussa Tembiné y Timothée Dolo escribieron:

Los niños todavía hacen el baile que les enseñaron en el pueblo y en el campo; eso realmente impresionó a los hombres, mujeres, jóvenes y niños. Gracias por todo eso. Las mujeres te invitan a salir a buscar leña a la duna rosa. La gente se pregunta cuándo será la próxima visita del grupo. En cuanto a la ciudad, ella nunca ha visto gente blanca venir y trabajar como lo has hecho en tu visita a Kansongho.57

Incluso después de muchos años de colaboración, sigue habiendo sorpresas que rompen con las apariencias y las expectativas. El coordinador de becas de Tandana supo, para su gran sorpresa, que una estudiante modelo que había estado recibiendo una beca de Tandana en la facultad de medicina durante cuatro años no vivía realmente en el apartamento por el cual Tandana estaba pagando el alquiler. Durante el duodécimo año de Tandana, la comunidad de Motilon Chupa, Ecuador se convirtió repentinamente en un socio muy entusiasta, invitando a los grupos de voluntarios de Tandana a permanecer en su comunidad y cocinar todas sus comidas favoritas para compartir con los visitantes. Y a medida que llegan nuevos miembros del personal y voluntarios, hay nuevos encuentros en vivo. El practicante Hailey Shanovich escribió:

A pesar de que Tandana me envió un extenso manual de pasantías y recibí una orientación al llegar a Otavalo, no estaba preparado para lo que me esperaba en mi comunidad anfitriona. La calidez con la que mi nueva familia me saludó y la buena voluntad y optimismo que tenían eran emocionalmente abrumadores para mí y continuamos acercándonos a una velocidad que antes había creído imposible.58

Hailey Stanovich (izquierda)

Matias Perugachi, un amigo de mucho tiempo y socio de Tandana de Panecillo, Ecuador, aprecia la naturaleza viva de estas interacciones. Explicando que “Tandana debe unirse, estar juntos, luchar juntos”, sostiene que “Tandana no es una palabra para dormir o una palabra muerta. Es una palabra viva.”59

Experimentando la diferencia

Llegar a comunidades de diferentes culturas, situaciones económicas y estilos de vida nos hace experimentar desigualdades y diferencias.60 Conocer diferentes formas de vida y ver representaciones de ellas es bastante diferente de experimentarlas realmente. Del mismo modo, el conocimiento de las desigualdades económicas no es lo mismo que experimentar lo que es vivir en una situación económica muy diferente a la propia. Cuando viajé a Kenia y era adolescente, tuve la oportunidad de experimentar la gran diferencia cultural y las enormes desigualdades económicas que se encuentran muy cerca de mí. Me sentía incómodo con mi relación como turista con la gente que conocí y cuyas vidas eran tan diferentes a las mías. Debido a esa experiencia, resolví encontrar una manera de desarrollar una relación que se sintiera más apropiada con personas que eran muy diferentes a mí. Este deseo me llevó a inscribirme en un programa de voluntariado en Ecuador, donde comencé a formar las relaciones que condujeron a Tandana. Los voluntarios y practicantes de Tandana continúan experimentando estas diferencias de primera mano. Hailey Shanovich escribió acerca de su pasantía con Tandana, “me permitió verme a mí mismo como parte de la imagen global y reconocer que las oportunidades para los ciudadanos globales están lejos de ser iguales dentro y entre las sociedades.”61 La voluntaria canadiense Rebecca Lewinson escribió sobre su experiencia:

Me ha abierto los ojos a un mundo nuevo, nuevas culturas y nuevas perspectivas sobre la familia, los amigos y cómo se trata a los demás. En esta última semana, he visto de primera mano cuán duro trabajará la gente para perseverar, incluso en las condiciones más difíciles. He visto personas que trabajan todo el día, solo para regresar a casa y trabajar más para poder mantener a sus familias, y he visto a personas que tienen muy poco y donan tanto como pueden a los voluntarios de Tandana que vinieron a ayudarlos.62

Rebecca (izquierda) aprendiendo sobre trajes tradicionales

La voluntaria de los Estados Unidos Jessica Morales describió su visita a una comunidad afroecuatoriana:

Es fácil leer sobre la historia dolorosa, pero es diferente cuando proviene directamente de alguien que habla de sus experiencias e identidad a causa de esa historia. Me abrió los ojos y me enoja pensar que tantos afrolatinos en general son ignorados en los medios, se les hace menos y son discriminados por su propia gente. . . . . Me hizo darme cuenta de que Ecuador está formado por individuos diferentes y diversos, con grupos que tienen sus propias tradiciones y formas de vida separadas.63

Jessica (de pie a la derecha) con su familia anfitriona y otro voluntario de TSC

También recordó su experiencia viviendo en una comunidad indígena sumergiéndola en una situación diferente a la que estaba acostumbrada:

No solo pude interactuar con personas como yo, que no tienen tanto problema para beber un vaso de leche o comer una comida completa, también interactué con personas que, a pesar de lo poco que tienen, están dispuestas a dar. Te olvidas de personas así cuando estás acostumbrado a un entorno privilegiado. También te olvidas de los alrededores cuando te acostumbras a caminar y tomar el autobús a todas partes, te saludan en la calle, mantienes una agradable conversación con un hombre o una mujer que acabas de conocer; estas son las interacciones que anhelo y espero experimentar.64

La voluntad de acercarse a aquellos cuyas vidas son diferentes hace posible estas experiencias de diferencia cultural y desigualdad económica.

45 Arrows 3 and 4 on the diagram.

46 Palmer, The Active Life, 69.

47 Palmer, Parker J., The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life, Tenth Anniversary Edition (San Francisco: Jossey Bass, 2007), 38.

48 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 37-38.

49 Mehta, 23.

50 Palmer, The Active Life, 71.

51 Levinas, 195.

52 Mehta, 22.

53 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 39.

54 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

55 Ibid.

56 Ongaro, Shannon, “yalema-palooza 2009” in the arts foundry, February 2, 2009 (http://theartsfoundry.blogspot.com/2009/02/yalema-palooza-2009.html).

57 Ibid.

58 Shanovich, Hailey, “An Intern Reflects on Global Citizenship,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog, February 23, 2016 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2016/02/23/an-intern-reflects-on-global- citizenship/).

59 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html 

60 Arrow 5 on the diagram.

61 Shanovich.

62 Lewinson, Rebecca, “Health Care Volunteer Vacation in Ecuador Opens a Participant’s Eyes,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog, April 4, 2017 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2017/04/21/health-care-volunteer-vacation-in-ecuador- opens-a-volunteers-eyes/#more-2342).

63 Morales, Jessica, “Volunteer Wants to Have a Home Everywhere She Goes After Tandana Experience” in The Tandana Foundation Blog, November 1, 2016 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/volunteer-wants-to-have-a-home-everywhere- she-goes-after-tandana-experience/).

Français

Rencontres en direct et Faire l’expérience de la différence: Partie 4

Le projet de développement comme tentative de «faire avancer» toutes les sociétés dans un continuum supposé est injustifiable. Et pourtant, il y a beaucoup de travail important à faire qui ressemble beaucoup au “développement”. Sans théorie du développement comme cadre directeur, pourquoi faisons-nous ce travail? J’ai essayé d’expliquer les fondements philosophiques du travail de Tandana, en décrivant comment ils conduisaient au travail que nous faisons, mais surtout, à la façon dont nous faisons ce travail.

Dans une série d’articles que vous trouverez ici, j’illustrerai comment les principes sur lesquels Tandana est fondée se concrétisent par des discussions sur mes propres expériences ainsi que sur celles de membres de la communauté et de bénévoles qui ont travaillé avec Tandana. Nous voyons comment le fait de s’approcher aux autres avec une approche personnelle conduit, à la fois en théorie et en pratique, à un monde de plus en plus pacifique et plus juste. Cette approche personnelle pourrait non seulement servir d’élan au travail d’une organisation, mais aussi transformer le caractère et les effets d’autres groupes à la recherche de bonnes relations avec les autres. Il s’agit de la seconde d’une série de 10 publications qui donneront un aperçu à la fois des raisons philosophiques et des effets concrets de la prise de contact avec une approche personnelle.

Si vous avez manqué la Partie 1, 2 et 3, lisez-la ici.

Rencontres en direct

Lorsque nous adoptons une perspective personnelle vis-à-vis des autres, en maintenant notre pluralité et en combinant cela avec la volonté de nous approcher à ceux qui sont différents, nous pouvons avoir ce que Parker Palmer appelle des “rencontres en direct.”45 “Dans chaque action”, explique-t-il, “il y en a une autre à laquelle l’acteur est associé et sur laquelle l’action dépend en partie.”46 Cependant, nous essayons souvent d’éviter de reconnaître l’autre ou de contenir l’autre dans la famille. Palmer décrit les peurs qui nous empêchent souvent de participer à des rencontres en direct. Il soutient que “la peur de la rencontre en direct est en réalité une séquence de peurs qui commence par la peur de la diversité” et qu’une autre couche de peur est “la peur de perdre notre identité.”47 Comme le souligne Palmer, “Nous craignons les rencontres” dans lesquelles l’autre est libre d’être lui-même, de dire sa propre vérité, de nous dire ce que nous ne voulons pas entendre. Nous voulons ces réunions à nos propres conditions, afin que nous puissions contrôler leurs résultats.»48 Cependant, comme le souligne Mehta:

Contenir ces différences [qui nous séparent et nous unissent potentiellement] ou les médiatiser par un accord préalable basé sur la raison, la liberté, l’éthique, l’internationalisme, le multiculturalisme, l’universalité des droits ou même la démocratie, est nier “le caché” “le paroissial”, “le traditionnel”, bref, l’inconnu, la possibilité même d’articuler le sens et l’âge de leurs propres expériences.49

Lorsque nous préservons réellement notre identité et celle des autres et que nous risquons de nous adresser à ceux qui sont différents, à la recherche d’une “relation légitime”, nous faisons l’expérience de la “rencontre vivante” de l’action correcte. Une rencontre entre la vérité interne de l’acteur et la vérité interne de l’autre qui pénètre toutes les apparences et les attentes extérieures.»50

Le dialogue, qui est la manière de parler qui découle plus naturellement d’une orientation de la première personne vers les autres, a le pouvoir de vaincre nos efforts pour contrôler la rencontre. Lévinas explique: “Dans le discours, la divergence qui s’ouvre inévitablement entre l’Autre en tant que sujet et l’Autre en tant qu’interlocuteur, émancipé du thème qui semblait le soutenir un moment, remet immédiatement en question le sens que j’attribue à mon interlocuteur. Du langage annonce l’inviolabilité éthique de l’autre.”51 Dans une rencontre vivante, la différence n’est pas contenue, et une interaction mène au nouveau et à l’inattendu. Mehta souligne également les risques, y compris la “possibilité de faire face à une opacité totale: une étrangeté intransigeante, une ignorance qui reste ainsi, une expérience qui ne peut être partagée, des préjugés qui ne se confondent pas facilement avec un horizon cosmopolite, une différence qui ne peut pas être assimilée.”52 Comme le souligne Palmer, il est toujours possible” qu’une rencontre vivante avec l’altérité nous mette au défi, ou nous oblige à changer nos vies “… L’altérité, prise au sérieux, invite toujours le transformation, nous appelle non seulement à de nouveaux faits, théories et valeurs, mais également à une nouvelle façon de vivre nos vies.”53 Nous devrons peut-être retourner au travail et revoir nos croyances et même nos pratiques, en fonction de l’expérience de la rencontre. En participant à une rencontre vivante, nous permettons à l’autre de s’exprimer et de couper l’image que nous en avons. Lorsque vous pouvez exposer votre altérité, les résultats sont imprévisibles et peuvent nous amener à modifier nos actions. Cette interaction dynamique est ce qui rend la réunion “live”.

Les rencontres en direct se produisent fréquemment dans le travail de Tandana. Mon premier séjour en Équateur a été une rencontre prolongée avec des personnes que je n’avais jamais rencontrées, mais qui sont devenues une famille et des amis. Je n’aurais jamais imaginé que vingt ans plus tard, je dirigerais une organisation qui travaille dans la même communauté et que visite deux fois par an. A travers la rencontre, j’ai découvert que j’étais dans des relations dans lesquelles j’avais des responsabilités. La façon dont je vivrais ma vie a profondément changé. Dans le travail de Tandana, chaque projet est réalisé grâce à l’interaction entre Tandana et une communauté ou une organisation. Le processus est ouvert et le résultat n’est pas prédéterminé. Lorsque les membres de la communauté et les bénévoles se rencontrent, il existe également de nombreuses possibilités d’apprentissage inattendu. Quand Tandana a amené pour la première fois un groupe de volontaires étrangers au village de Kansongho, au Mali, le plan n’est pas allé très loin. Les horaires de travail ont changé, le dépôt de la banque de céréales que les résidents et les visiteurs construisaient ensemble s’est effondré et de nouvelles invitations et cadeaux ont été offerts chaque jour. Grâce à cette rencontre en direct, toutes les personnes impliquées ont appris et ont changé d’une certaine manière. Mick Lundquist, bénévole de treize ans, a écrit: «Cela m’a ouvert les yeux et le cœur, changé mon regard sur le monde et changé ma façon de vivre.54

Mick Lundquist (la gauche)

Dick Brigden, un volontaire d’une soixantaine d’années, a déclaré qu’il parlerait aux autres d’un voyage comme celui-ci: “Allez avec un esprit ouvert et un coeur ouvert, et les deux seront touchés et vous aurez l’occasion de toucher les autres.”55

Dick Brigden (droite)

Shannon Ongaro, coordinatrice du programme, a déclaré après cette réunion: “Le monde a changé depuis la dernière fois que je vous ai écrit, [j’avoue] que j’ai également changé. . [Je voudrais penser que chacun de nous est dans un flux constant, un état dans lequel nous sommes ouverts aux expériences et par conséquent nous sommes modifiés et améliorés par eux.”56

Shannon Ongaro (droite)

Attentes Moussa Tembiné et Timothée Dolo ont écrit:

Les enfants font encore la danse qui leur a été enseignée au village et à la campagne; cela a vraiment impressionné les hommes, les femmes, les jeunes et les enfants. Merci pour tout ça. Les femmes vous invitent à sortir pour chercher du bois de chauffage dans la dune rose. Les gens se demandent quand la prochaine visite de groupe aura lieu. En ce qui concerne la ville, elle n’a jamais vu de Blancs venir et travailler comme vous l’avez fait lors de votre visite à Kansongho.57

Même après de nombreuses années de collaboration, il reste encore des surprises qui rompent avec les apparences et les attentes. Le coordinateur des bourses de Tandana a appris, à sa grande surprise, qu’un étudiant modèle qui recevait une bourse à la faculté de médecine depuis quatre ans n’habitait pas dans l’appartement pour lequel Tandana payait le loyer. Pendant la douzième année de Tandana, la communauté de Motilon Chupa, l’Équateur est soudainement devenu un partenaire très enthousiaste, invitant les groupes de volontaires de Tandana à rester dans leur communauté et à cuisiner tous leurs aliments préférés pour les partager avec les visiteurs. Et à mesure que de nouveaux membres du personnel et des volontaires arrivent, il y a de nouvelles rencontres en direct. Le stagiaire Hailey Shanovich a écrit:

Même si Tandana m’a envoyé un manuel de stage détaillé et que j’ai reçu une orientation à mon arrivée à Otavalo, je n’étais pas préparé à ce qui m’attendait dans ma communauté d’accueil. La chaleur avec laquelle ma nouvelle famille m’a accueilli et la bonne volonté et l’optimisme qu’ils m’ont procuré ont été bouleversants sur le plan émotionnel et nous avons continué à nous approcher à une vitesse que je croyais impossible auparavant.58

Hailey Stanovich (la gauche)

Matias Perugachi, ami de longue date et partenaire de Tandana de Panecillo, en Équateur, apprécie la nature vivante de ces interactions. Expliquant que “Tandana doit s’unir, être ensemble, se battre ensemble”, elle soutient que “Tandana n’est pas un mot pour dormir ou un mot mort, c’est une parole vivante.”59

Faire l’expérience de la différence

Arriver aux communautés de différentes cultures, avec de situations économiques et de styles de vie différents nous fait vivre des inégalités et des différences.60 Connaître différentes formes de vie et voir des représentations est très différent de les vivre réellement. De la même manière, la connaissance des inégalités économiques n’est pas la même chose que de vivre ce qui est expérimenté dans une situation économique différente de la vôtre. Quand j’ai voyagé au Kenya et j’étais adolescent, j’ai eu l’occasion de faire l’expérience de la grande différence culturelle et des énormes inégalités économiques qui me sont très proches. Je me sentais mal à l’aise avec ma relation de touriste avec les personnes que j’ai rencontrées et dont la vie était si différente de la mienne. Grâce à cette expérience, j’ai décidé de trouver un moyen de développer une relation plus appropriée avec des personnes très différentes de moi. Ce désir m’a amené à m’inscrire à un programme de bénévolat en Équateur, où j’ai commencé à former les relations qui ont conduit à Tandana. Les volontaires et les stagiaires de Tandana continuent à faire l’expérience de ces différences. Hailey Shanovich a écrit à propos de son stage chez Tandana, “cela m’a permis de me considérer comme une image globale et de reconnaître que les opportunités pour les citoyens du monde sont loin d’être égales au sein des sociétés et entre elles”. Rebecca Lewinson, bénévole canadienne de 61 ans, a écrit sur son expérience:

Cela m’a ouvert les yeux sur un nouveau monde, de nouvelles cultures et de nouvelles perspectives sur la famille, les amis et la façon dont les autres sont traités. Au cours de la semaine dernière, j’ai constaté à quel point les gens vont travailler dur pour persévérer, même dans les conditions les plus difficiles. J’ai vu des gens qui travaillaient toute la journée, seulement pour rentrer chez eux et travailler davantage pour subvenir aux besoins de leurs familles, et j’ai vu des gens qui avaient très peu et qui donnaient autant qu’ils le pouvaient aux bénévoles de Tandana qui étaient venus les aider.62

Rebecca (à gauche) avec une nouvelle amie

La volontaire américaine Jessica Morales a décrit sa visite dans une communauté afro-équatorienne:

Il est facile de lire sur l’histoire douloureuse, mais c’est différent quand cela vient directement de quelqu’un qui parle de ses expériences et de son identité à cause de cette histoire. Cela m’a ouvert les yeux et cela me fâche de penser que beaucoup d’afro-latino-américains sont généralement ignorés par les médias, qu’ils obtiennent moins et qu’ils sont discriminés par leur propre peuple. . . . . Cela m’a fait comprendre que l’Équateur est composé d’individus différents et diversifiés, avec des groupes qui ont leurs propres traditions et modes de vie distincts.63

Jessica (à droite) avec sa famille d’accueil et une autre bénévole du TSC

Elle a également rappelé son expérience de vie dans une communauté autochtone qui l’avait plongée dans une situation différente de celle à laquelle elle était habituée:

Non seulement je pouvais interagir avec des gens comme moi, qui n’avaient pas autant de difficulté à boire un verre de lait ou à manger un repas complet, mais aussi avec des gens qui, malgré le peu qu’ils ont, sont disposés à donner. Vous oubliez les gens comme ça quand vous êtes habitué à un environnement privilégié. Vous oubliez également les environs lorsque vous vous habituez à marcher et à prendre l’autobus partout, ils vous accueillent dans la rue, vous avez une belle conversation avec un homme ou une femme que vous venez de rencontrer; Ce sont ces interactions que j’espère ardemment et que j’espère vivre.

45 Arrows 3 and 4 on the diagram.

46 Palmer, The Active Life, 69.

47 Palmer, Parker J., The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life, Tenth Anniversary Edition (San Francisco: Jossey Bass, 2007), 38.

48 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 37-38.

49 Mehta, 23.

50 Palmer, The Active Life, 71.

51 Levinas, 195.

52 Mehta, 22.

53 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 39.

54 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

55 Ibid.

56 Ongaro, Shannon, “yalema-palooza 2009” in the arts foundry, February 2, 2009 (http://theartsfoundry.blogspot.com/2009/02/yalema-palooza-2009.html).

57 Ibid.

58 Shanovich, Hailey, “An Intern Reflects on Global Citizenship,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog, February 23, 2016 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2016/02/23/an-intern-reflects-on-global- citizenship/).

59 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html 

60 Arrow 5 on the diagram.

61 Shanovich.

62 Lewinson, Rebecca, “Health Care Volunteer Vacation in Ecuador Opens a Participant’s Eyes,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog, April 4, 2017 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2017/04/21/health-care-volunteer-vacation-in-ecuador- opens-a-volunteers-eyes/#more-2342).

63 Morales, Jessica, “Volunteer Wants to Have a Home Everywhere She Goes After Tandana Experience” in The Tandana Foundation Blog, November 1, 2016 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/volunteer-wants-to-have-a-home-everywhere- she-goes-after-tandana-experience/).

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s