A Holistic and Complete Experience

Ellza with new friends

Ellza with new friends

 

By Eliza Silverman

Tandana HCVV19 Volunteer

It was late one night at the hospital that I first stumbled across Tandana. I became a nurse because I wanted a skill set useful anywhere, and yet I had never been a nurse outside of the hospital setting. Now desperate for something meaningful to do with the vacation week I had been assigned, and determined to make the most of my time, I searched the Internet for a travel opportunity. I had an idea of what I wanted: a trip focused on healthcare, with an organized group, and most importantly, through a non-profit organization with strong values in regards to working with communities, fostering relationships, and respecting culture. I could not believe my luck when The Tandana Foundation popped into my search results. It was exactly what I had been looking for.

I was immediately surprised with what a large operation Tandana is. Their work goes beyond healthcare and into the realms of education and environment as well. In addition to hosting medical professionals twice a year, they are kept busy funding an educational scholarship program, hosting college and high school groups, and building and beautifying schools and community centers. They have American interns living in Otavalo for 6-9 months at a time teaching English in schools, helping with a patient follow up program at the subcentro (the local health clinic), and assisting with the volunteer vacations. They have group leaders from both the U.S. and Ecuador. Each day when we traveled to a remote site in Imbabura Province, our group consisted of: American volunteers, American expats living locally, Ecuadorian dentists, Ecuadorian university scholarship students, local translators (Kichwa to Spanish, Spanish to English), staff from the local subcentro, host family members, our wonderful bus driver, and sometimes other members of the community. I was so proud to show up every day with such a diverse group of people.

Eliza and the other nurse

Eliza and the other nurse

We unloaded the bus and immediately got to work. Another nurse and I were in charge of the lab for the week. We were set to perform simple blood and urine tests, ear flushes, give shots, and carry out the occasional rapid strep test.

As a nurse, I’m more than familiar with the ins and outs of the human body, but I’m also used to retracting lancets, specimen cups, and sending fluid samples off to some unknown place where results are generated and then magically inputted into the electronic medical record. It seems silly now, but I was slightly intimidated by the manual nature of the work. Eventually, however, I eased into these simple tasks with the help of the other nurse, and our daily problem became where we would find electricity to warm the water for our ear flushes.

How amazing it was to be out of the hospital! How incredible to perform a blood test and see it through from start to finish! How wonderful to get back to the basics of healthcare! How fun to work with limited resources and remember that healthcare is more than just high tech equipment! How important to remember why I wanted to be a nurse in the first place! How interesting to learn about the health issues and ailments that affect a specific population of people!

Eliza enjoying children singing

Eliza enjoying children singing

How special to connect to schoolchildren from another culture, hear their songs, and be witness to their curiosity (and also how kind and patient of them to help me practice my Spanish)!

I feel very privileged to have been a part of the Tandana Health Care Volunteer Vacation. There are many things that make this foundation a unique organization, but one reason is its emphasis on exchange.

the meal made during the cooking class

the meal made during the cooking class

In the evenings we had a cooking class, visited a shaman, went to a museum, hiked to a waterfall, and learned how to knit and make bracelets. I feel like I learned at least as much as I was able to contribute, and this makes the experience feel simultaneously holistic and complete.

On our last night, we were having our goodbye dinner in Otavalo before the teams heading to the airport. Musicians were playing, and the mood was celebratory. At a certain point I thought, “All right everyone, I know the music is catchy, but stomp a little less because the whole room is shaking!” It was then that one of our group leaders recognized the shaking as an earthquake. It went on for what felt like forever, although in retrospect, it was probably a minute or two. It wasn’t until we arrived at the airport that we were able to read about the earthquake’s magnitude and its growing death toll.

I can imagine that the earthquake has struck a nerve with all of us. Although Imbabura Province was largely unharmed, I came away from Ecuador feeling wholly connected to it. We cannot know the full extent of the suffering and damage that the earthquake has caused and is still causing, but I know all of our hearts are breaking for the country where we found so much kindness and beauty. I truly look forward to returning again.

 

Por Eliza Silverman

Tandana HCVV19 Vacaciones de Voluntario

Era tarde una noche, cuando por primera vez me crucé con Tandana. Me hice enfermera porque quise tener una habilidad que fuera útil en cualquier lugar, aunque nunca había ejercido la enfermería fuera del hospital. Estaba determinada a hacer algo significativo en la semana de vacaciones que tenía y estaba determinada a aprovechar el tiempo, busqué por internet por oportunidades de viaje. Tenía una idea de lo que estaba buscando, un viaje enfocado en el cuidado de la salud, con un grupo organizado, y más importante, a través de una organización sin fines de lucro con fuertes valores en cuanto  trabajo comunitario, establecer relaciones y respetar la cultura. No pude creer mi suerte cuando la Fundación Tandana, apareció entre mis resultados. Era exactamente lo que estaba buscando

Quedé inmediatamente sorprendida con la magnitud de la operación Tandana. Su trabajo va mas allá del cuidado de la salud y dentro de la realidad de la educación y el medio ambiente también. Además de albergar profesionales médicos dos veces al año, se mantienen ocupados solventando un programa de becas educacionales, albergando grupos de estudiantes de secundaria y universitarios construyendo y embelleciendo escuelas y centros comunitarios.  Hay internos estadounidenses, que viven en Otavalo de 6-9 meses enseñando Inglés en escuelas, ayudando a pacientes con programas de chequeo en el subcentro (la clínica local) y asistiendo con las vacaciones de voluntarios. Hay líderes de grupo de ambos países Estados Unidos y Ecuador. Cada día, cuando viajábamos a una remota localidad de la provincial de Imbabura, nuestro grupo consistía en voluntarios estadounidenses, repatriados estadounidenses que viven en la localidad, dentistas ecuatorianos, estudiantes universitarios ecuatorianos becados, traductores locales (kichwa a español, español a inglés), miembros de la clínica local, miembros de familias anfitrionas, nuestro maravilloso chofer de bus, y a veces otros miembros de la comunidad. Me sentía muy orgullosa de presentarme cada día con este grupo de gente tan diversa.

otro voluntario Tandaña trabaja en el laboratorio

la enfermera con lacual Eliza trabajaba en el laboratorio

Bajamos del autobús e inmediatamente nos pusimos a trabajar. Otra enfermera y yo estuvimos a cargo del laboratorio esa semana. Se nos brindó lo necesario para realizar simples exámenes de sangre y orina, lavados de oído, aplicar inyecciones, y ocasionalmente realizar una rápida prueba de estreptococo.

Como enfermera, estoy más que familiarizada con lo referente al cuerpo humano, pero también estoy acostumbrada al uso de lancetas retractiles, frascos de muestra, enviar muestras de fluidos a un lugar desconocido en el cual generan los resultados y mágicamente estos aparecen en la base de datos médica. Puede sonar extraño ahora, pero me encontraba un poco intimidada por todo el procedimiento manual de este proceso.

Eventualmente me sentí más tranquila con estos simples procedimientos gracias a la ayuda de otra enfermera, y nuestro problema diario fue el de conseguir electricidad par calendar el agua realizar los lavados de oído.

pacientes en espera de tratamiento

los pacientes en espera de tratamiento

Que maravilloso fue estar fuera del hospital. ¡Que increíble fue realizar pruebas de sangre y observar el proceso desde el comienzo hasta el final! Fue maravilloso regresar a lo básico del cuidado de la salud. Fue divertido trabajar con recursos limitados y recordar que el cuidado de la salud es más que el uso de equipos de alta tecnología. ¡Cuán importante recordar porque quise ser enfermera en primer lugar!  Fue muy interesante aprender sobre problemas de salud y enfermedades que afectan a un especifico grupo de pobladores. ¡Qué especial conectarme con niños en edad escolar que tiene otra cultura, escuchar sus canciones y ser testigo de sus curiosidades (además de su amabilidad y paciencia para ayudarme a practicar mi español)!

Me siento muy privilegiada de haber sido parte de las Vacaciones de Voluntarios del cuidado de la salud de Tandana. Hay muchas cosas que hacen a esta fundación una organización única, sin embargo, una razón es su énfasis en intercambio.

tejido de punto

haciendo pulseras

  Por las tardes teníamos una clase de cocina, visitábamos a un chamán, fuimos al museo, hicimos caminatas hacia una caída de agua y aprendimos a tejer y hacer brazaletes. Siento como que aprendí al mismo ritmo que contribuí, y esto hace que la experiencia se sienta simultáneamente incorporadora y completa.

En nuestra última noche, tuvimos una cena de despedida en Otavalo antes de dirigirnos al aeropuerto. Los músicos tocaban y el ambiente era de celebración. ¡En cierto momento pensé “bien, sé que la música es contagiosa, pero dejen de zapatear que todo el cuarto está temblando”!  fue en ese momento en el que uno de los integrantes de nuestro grupo reconoció el movimiento como un terremoto. Duró mucho y continuaba por lo que parecía una eternidad, pero en retrospectiva duró un minuto o dos. No fue hasta que arribamos al aeropuerto que pudimos leer sobre la magnitud del terremoto y la cantidad creciente de muertes.

Me puedo imaginar que el terremoto a afectado un nervio en todos nosotros. A pesar de que la provincia de Imbabura no fue muy afectada, me retiré de Ecuador sintiéndome bastante conectada a ello. No podemos saber la total extensión del sufrimiento y daño que causó el terremoto y que continua causando, pero sí sé que nuestros corazones esta rotos por el país en el cual encontramos tanta amabilidad y belleza. En verdad estoy ansiosa de regresar otra vez.

 

 

Par Eliza Silverman

Bénévole Tandana HCVV19

J’ai découvert l’existence de la fondation Tandana au beau milieu de la nuit, à l’hôpital. Si je suis devenue infirmière, c’est parce que je voulais pouvoir mettre à profit mes compétences dans n’importe quel environnement, et pourtant, je n’avais jusqu’alors jamais exercé hors de l’hôpital. Comme j’étais bien décidée à occuper de façon utile la semaine de congé qui m’avait été accordée et que je comptais bien en profiter au mieux, je me suis mise à chercher sur internet une occasion de voyager. J’avais une idée assez précise de ce que je voulais : un séjour axé sur les soins de santé aux côtés d’une organisation à but non lucratif qui soit profondément engagée auprès des communautés tout en respectant les cultures et en établissant des liens entre elles. Ce fut une véritable aubaine pour moi de tomber sur la fondation Tandana au cours de ma recherche, car la fondation correspondait exactement ce que je cherchais.

nuevos amigos

des nouvelles amies

L’organisation me frappa d’emblée par son envergure. Leurs activités vont bien au-delà des soins de santé et concernent tout aussi bien l’éducation ou l’environnement. En plus d’accueillir du personnel médical deux fois par an, les membres de la fondation s’emploient à financer un programme de scolarisation, ils accueillent des groupes de lycéens et d’étudiants et construisent ou rénovent des écoles et des centres communautaires. La fondation envoie des stagiaires américains à Otavalo pour des périodes de 6 à 9 mois pour y enseigner l’anglais, participer au programme de suivi des patients du subcentro (la clinique locale) et s’occuper de l’accueil des bénévoles. Le personnel encadrant est constitué de personnes venant aussi bien des États-Unis, que d’Équateur. Chaque jour, lors de nos interventions dans une zone reculée de la province d’Imbabura, notre groupe était composé de bénévoles et d’expatriés américains vivant sur place, de dentistes et d’étudiants équatoriens, d’interprètes locaux (pour la traduction du kichwa à l’espagnol et de l’espagnol à l’anglais), de membres du personnel du subcentro, de membres des familles d’accueil, de notre formidable chauffeur de bus, et parfois d’autres membres de la communauté. J’avais beaucoup de fierté à rejoindre chaque jour un groupe aussi diversifié.

Nous nous mettions au travail dès la descente du bus. J’étais chargée pour la semaine de m’occuper du laboratoire d’analyses avec une autre infirmière. Nous devions effectuer de simples analyses de sang et d’urine, des nettoyages du conduit auditif, des injections et des tests de diagnostic rapide, de temps en temps.

Je connais bien, en tant qu’infirmière, les aléas du corps humain, et je suis aussi habituée à récupérer des lancettes ou des coupelles de prélèvement et à envoyer les échantillons je ne sais trop où afin qu’ils soient traduits en résultats qui viennent comme par magie renseigner le dossier médical par voie électronique. Cela paraît maintenant idiot, mais j’étais alors un peu intimidée par la procédure manuelle en vigueur. Je me suis pourtant adaptée peu à peu à ces actes simples grâce à l’aide de l’autre infirmière, jusqu’à ce que notre problème quotidien se résume à trouver une source d’électricité pour réchauffer l’eau nécessaire aux lavements d’oreilles.

ES_pic9

les patients

C’était vraiment merveilleux de se retrouver hors des murs de l’hôpital ! C’était extraordinaire d’effectuer une analyse de sang du début à la fin et formidable de revenir aux fondamentaux des soins de santé ! C’était si plaisant de travailler avec des moyens limités et de reprendre conscience que les soins médicaux ne se réduisent pas à des équipements high tech ! Il était vraiment crucial de me rappeler pourquoi j’avais voulu devenir infirmière ! Comme ça a été passionnant de découvrir les problèmes de santé qui affectent les membres d’une population donnée et d’entrer en relation avec des écoliers appartenant à une autre culture, de découvrir leurs chants et d’être témoin de leur curiosité (mais aussi de la patience et de la gentillesse dont ils ont su faire preuve en ce qui concerne ma connaissance de l’espagnol) !

Ce fut pour moi un privilège d’avoir participé à ce séjour bénévole auprès de la fondation Tandana. Cette organisation est unique à bien des égards, mais elle se distingue notamment par la priorité qu’elle accorde à l’échange. En soirée, nous avons assisté à un cours de cuisine, nous avons rendu visite à un shaman, nous avons visité un musée, nous sommes allés voir des chutes d’eau et nous avons appris à tricoter et à confectionner des bracelets. J’ai le sentiment d’avoir au moins autant appris que contribué, ce qui fait de cette aventure une expérience à la fois globale et complète.

Le dernier soir s’est tenu un dîner d’adieu à Otavalo, avant notre retour à l’aéroport. Il y avait des musiciens, et l’ambiance était festive. À un moment, je me suis dit : « Ok, tout le monde, je suis d’accord, la musique est entraînante, mais tapez du pied un peu moins fort, parce que vous faites trembler toute la pièce !». C’est alors qu’un de nos accompagnateurs s’est rendu compte qu’il s’agissait en fait d’un tremblement de terre. J’ai eu l’impression que cela a duré une éternité, bien qu’en fait cela n’ait duré qu’une ou deux minutes. Ce n’est qu’une fois à l’aéroport que nous avons appris quelle avait été la magnitude de ce tremblement de terre et combien de victimes il avait déjà fait.

de beaux paysages

de beaux paysages

Cet événement nous a sans aucun doute tous profondément marqués. Même si la province d’Imbabura a été plutôt épargnée, je suis rentrée d’Équateur avec un fort sentiment d’attache. In ne nous est pas possible de connaître l’ampleur de la souffrance et des dégâts causés par ce tremblement de terre, mais je sais que nous avons tous de la peine pour ce pays où nous avons trouvé tant de bonté et de beauté. J’ai vraiment hâte d’y retourner.

Advertisements

One thought on “A Holistic and Complete Experience

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s