A Young Volunteer Reports on her Ecuador Trip with Ohio State Master Gardeners

 

Nola and Hudi, an Ecuadorian student she met during her trip

Nola and Hudi, an Ecuadorian student she met during her trip

Hi! My name is Nola Killpack and I am twelve years old. I just spent a week in Highland Ecuador with a small group of Master Gardeners from Ohio and Michigan. I am not a Master Gardener, but my mom invited me to come along as a volunteer.  This service trip through the Tandana Foundation allowed us to be in communities, not as tourists but as friends and work as partners. I never would have guessed that this is how I would spend the third week of February! Before we left I had no idea what to expect. I am studying Spanish at school so it was a perfect place to practice Spanish, and indeed when I was there, I even thought in Spanish. I was also challenged to learn a few words of the native language Kichwa – ‘mashi’ means friend and ‘pai’ means thank you, especially for food.Miles, Megan and Mateo were our guides for our week of experiences and adventures. I will always remember doing yoga with Mateo (and LaCresia!) in the garden.  Megan helped me so much with my Spanish. Miles stayed up all night to pick us up at the Quito airport at 3:30am in the morning. Don Galo is the best bus driver ever!  I loved talking with Maria Cristina because she is a true Ecuadorian!

planting trees in Pastavi

planting trees in Pastavi

Our first working day was Sunday. We travelled to Pastavi, a town twenty-seven kilometers north of the Equator. We partnered with this town to plant about 130 trees. The people hoped that these trees would beautify their town and purify the air. Don Teofilo showed us how deep to plant the trees and how much compost to use.  As I worked with Hedy, I enjoyed talking with the children and watching the chickens and dogs. It was a very hot day to dig and carry water, but we were able to look forward to lunch with the community. A minga is a community gathering to work together and usually includes a feast afterwards. The lunch at our minga was very delicious and hosted at Don Carlos and Susana’s house. In their courtyard Susana laid out reed mats and put sheets on top. Community members brought some food to share with everyone. They gave their food to Susana who placed it onto the sheet. Then all the guests and community members came up to fill their bowls with food.  Most of us used our fingers to eat from the bowl. There were potatoes, rice, chicken intestines, chicken, corn, hard boiled eggs and watercress. It was fun to put popcorn on top! I thought it was interesting to try the chicken intestines and the many differently prepared colorful potatoes. It was inspirational to see that the president of this town was a woman. President Inez gave a speech of thanks which was followed by a Valentine’s message, in English, from Tandana scholarship student Monica. On this first work day I realized how special it was to be included in this circle of trust that had already been established between the Tandana Foundation and this community.

That afternoon we met at the Tandana office and hiked down a steep hill to the Cocina Samyanuy cooking school. We were greeted by Claudia and her cousin Margarita.

a Master Gardener cooking chicken

a Master Gardener cooking chicken

Our group was taught how to make quinoa pancakes with ham and vegetables, salad with radishes and lupin beans (which are only edible after being soaked and rinsed for several days), hot salad with carrots, cauliflower and broccoli and chicken that we cooked on a skillet over an open fire. For dessert we had quimbolitos, which are like a sugary, buttery cornmeal paste wrapped and steamed in a banana leaf. To drink we had passion fruit and naranjilla juice.  As a Valentine’s treat, Claudia had made homemade chocolates!

After our cooking lesson, Claudia’s cousin Margarita showed us around their vegetable and herb garden. She taught us the names of the plants and their medicinal uses. Then Margarita taught us about the traditional dress of Otavalo and I even got to try it on! The traditional dress includes a ribbon wrapped around hair, gold earrings, gold necklaces and red bracelets to ward off evil spirits. Women wear embroidered blouses under shawls. Women thirty-five and older wear these shawls as headscarves, unmarried women tie it on their left shoulder, married women tie it on their right shoulder, and older women tie it in the middle. Women wear skirts called anacos. The layer on the bottom is white or cream and represents day.  The top is black or navy blue and represents night. To hold the anacos in place women use two belts. The bigger one is called the mama chumbi and the smaller one is called the wawachumbi. They are wrapped tightly around the waist on top of each other.

Claudia is my role model because she has so many dreams.  Unlike most people she does not think of dreams as only dreams, but as her real future and she works hard to fulfill her goals.  She was a dedicated scholarship student through Tandana and her dreams became reality when she opened a cooking school.  She is now building a bed and breakfast and hopes to open a museum showcasing the original home built in traditional mud wall and thatch technique.

planting ornamentals at the Quichinche school

planting ornamentals at the Quichinche school

My favorite day was Monday, our first of four days working at the Quichinche school. This school has about seven hundred students and we helped to plant ornamental and medicinal gardens and many trees. As soon as we started to carry plants from the school yard up the hill to the gardens, kids started talking to me. They asked me what onion, kitchen and chicken were in English. Most of the students in this group were my age and I even learned I was seven days younger than one girl, whose name was Genesis. When it was announced that we would be working with partners to plant the ornamentals, Genesis, Michelle and Anahi all wanted to be my partner. At the end of the morning I did not want to say goodbye to my friends. I wished we could be friends forever and hoped I would see them the next day.

Over the next two days we planted medicinal plants and trees with students that were a little bit older than me.  During these days we worked in a large group instead of with partners. Although Genesis, Michelle and Anahi were not assigned to the garden again, I would see them briefly and chat with them when I was filling water bottles from the hose for the plants. One day after gardening when we were loading the tools into the bus, we met a few younger kids outside of the school. A young six year old girl named Hudi kept hugging me and asking, “Why is your hair yellow?”  During our last morning at the school we were able to teach students lessons about gardening. I had worked on lesson plans with Judy and my mom during the evenings earlier in the week. After these small group lessons, the entire school held a short ceremony on the playground to say thank you…and I danced in it! was sitting with our gardening group watching the dancers when a teacher came over, grabbed my hand and pulled me towards the dancers. He started dancing and I then started dancing too! Then everyone came out and started dancing together – the teachers, all the students and the gardeners.  I will always remember that.

After we danced I was surrounded by students who wanted to braid my hair. I sat with them and I was left with some lovely braids. Now here comes the sad part…when it was over, the kids went back to their classes and I never got to say goodbye to Genesis, Michelle and Anahi! But I did get to find Hudi and share a photograph and a hug.  I don’t know if I will ever see them again, but I have the best memories!

We stayed at La Posade del Quinde.  Maggie and her staff were like family.  I loved the food, the gardens and hanging out with Pacha, the faithful perro (dog). In the afternoons, we had different adventures and outings.  We had a picnic and hiked to “La Cascada de Peguche.” We visited the home of a musician, made our own pan flutes, and listened to Jose Luiz and his family play traditional Ecuadorian music for us. I really liked visiting the reed cooperative workshop “Totora SISA” and the plant nursery in Morochos. I also went hat shopping with Brian in the Plaza de Ponchos. On our last night, we had a fancy dinner in a beautiful lodge called Casa Mojandaon the mountainside.  There was a band playing more traditional music and we all danced and played some percussion.  Judy is a great dancer! Then sadly, it was time to head to the airport.  I would have liked one more adventure – to go to the Galapagos with Jane!

I am so thankful that I had this opportunity. I loved meeting Anna and her husband John and I appreciate that The Tandana Foundation let me join in as a young volunteer. It is amazing what a group can do together and I hope I can plan another trip through Tandana with friends when I am in high school. I am grateful that Pam and Denise opened the door for me to come along!  I hope to visit you at OSU very soon!

Pai!

Tu Mashi, (Your Friend)

Nolita

 

¡Hola! Me llamo Nola Killpack y tengo 12 años. Acabo de pasar una semana en los Andes ecuatorianos con un pequeño grupo de Jardineros Maestros de Ohio y Michigan (Master Gardeners). Yo no soy una Jardinera Maestra, pero mi madre me invitó a ir con ella como voluntaria. Este viaje de voluntariado por medio de la Fundación Tandana  nos permitió vivir en comunidades, no como turistas, sino como amigos y trabajar como compañeros. Nunca hubiera imaginado que pasaría la tercera semana de febrero de esta manera. Antes de que viniéramos, no sabía qué esperarme. Yo estudio español en el colegio, así que era el lugar perfecto para practicar español; y la verdad es que una vez allí, yo incluso “pensaba” en español. También tuve el reto de aprender unas pocas palabras  en la lengua nativa  Quichua: ‘mashi’ significa amigo y ‘pai’ significa gracias, especialmente para agradecer la comida. Miles, Megan y Mateo fueron nuestros guías durante nuestra semana de experiencias y aventuras. Siempre recordaré cuando hacía yoga con Mateo (y La Cresia!) en el jardín. Megan me ayudó muchísimo con mi español. Miles estuvo despierto toda la noche para recogernos del aeropuerto de Quito a las 3:30 a.m. Don Galo es el mejor conductor de autobús del mundo.  Me encantaba hablar con Maria Cristina porque es una ecuatoriana auténtica.

Nuestro primer día de trabajo fue un domingo. Viajamos a Pastavi, un pueblo a 27 km del norte del ecuador. Nos asociamos con este pueblo para plantar 130 árboles. La gente esperaba que estos árboles embellecieran su ciudad y purificaran el aire. Don Teofilo nos enseñó a que profundidad plantar los árboles y cuánto abono utilizar.  Como yo trabajaba con Hedy, yo disfruté hablando con los niños y observando las gallinas y los perros. Hacía mucho calor para cavar y llevar agua; sin embargo, esperábamos con ganas la hora de la comida con la comunidad. Una minga es una reunión comunitaria para trabajar juntos y normalmente incluye un banquete después. La comida en nuestra minga estuvo deliciosa y se celebró en casa de Don Carlos y Susana.  En su patio Susana puso unas esteras y unas bandejas encima. Los miembros de la comunidad trajeron comida para compartir con todos.  Se la dieron a Susana que la colocó en las bandejas.  A continuación, todos los invitados y miembros de la comunidad llenaron sus cuencos con comida. La mayoría de nosotros comimos del cuenco con las manos. Había patatas, arroz, intestinos de pollo, pollo, huevos cocidos y berros. Fue divertido poner palomitas de maíz encima. Fue muy interesante probar los intestinos de pollo y la gran cantidad de patatas de diferentes colores. Me inspiró el ver que el presidente de este pueblo era una mujer. La presidenta Inez ofreció un discurso de agradecimiento, que fue seguido de un mensaje de San Valentín, en inglés, procedente de Mónica, una estudiante becada por Tandana. En este primer día de trabajo me di cuenta de lo especial que era ser incluida en el círculo de confianza que ya había sido establecido entre la Fundación Tandana y esta comunidad.

Esa tarde nos reunimos en la oficina de Tandana y bajamos una empinada colina hacia la escuela culinaria Cocina Samyanuy.  Claudia y su prima Margarita nos recibieron. A nuestro grupo se nos enseñó a hacer tortitas de quínoa con jamón y verduras,  ensalada con rábanos y alubias lupinas (las cuales solo son comestibles tras varios días en remojo y ser escurridas); ensalada caliente con zanahorias, coliflor, brécol y pollo, todo cocinado en una sartén a fuego abierto. De postre tomamos quimbolitos, que son como una pasta dulce, de harina de maíz mantecosa, envuelta y hervida en una hoja de plátano. De beber, tomamos maracuyá y un jugo de naranjilla.

preparación de la cena de San Valentín

preparación de la cena de San Valentín

Como obsequio de San Valentín, Claudia hizo bombones de chocolate caseros.

Después de la clase de cocina, Margarita, la prima de Claudia, nos mostró el jardín de verduras y hierbas. Nos enseñó los nombres de las plantas y sus usos medicinales.

Luego nos habló  del traje tradicional de Otavalo; y yo incluso me lo probé. Este vestido tradicional contiene un lazo atado alrededor del pelo, pendientes y collares de oro y pulseras rojas para protegerse de los malos espíritus. Las mujeres llevan blusas bordadas bajo los mantones. Las mujeres mayores de 35 años  llevan estos mantones como pañoletas, las mujeres solteras las llevan en el hombro izquierdo, las casadas en el hombro derecho; y las mujeres mayores en el medio.

Margarita y Nola

Margarita y Nola

Las mujeres llevan unas faldas llamadas anacos. La parte inferior es de color blanco o crema y representa el día. La parte superior es de color negro o azul marino y representa la noche. Para sujetar esta falda, las mujeres usan dos cinturones. El más grande se llama mama chumbi y el más pequeño se llama wawa chumbi. Se envuelven fuertemente  alrededor de la cintura uno encima del otro.

Claudia es mi ejemplo a seguir porque ella tiene tantos sueños. A diferencia de otras personas, ella no considera sus sueños meros sueños, sino su futuro real y trabaja mucho para alcanzar su meta. Ella era una dedicada estudiante becada por Tandana y sus sueños se hicieron realidad al abrir una escuela culinaria. Ahora está construyendo un hostal en régimen de alojamiento y desayuno;  y confía en abrir un museo que muestre la  primera casa construida con la técnica tradicional de paredes de barro y paja.

Mi día favorito fue el lunes, nuestro primer día de los cuatro trabajando en la escuela Quichinche. Esta escuela tiene 700 estudiantes y les ayudamos a plantar jardines ornamentales y medicinales, además de numerosos árboles. En cuanto comenzamos a llevar plantas desde el patio del colegio cuesta arriba hasta los jardines, los niños  empezaron a hablar conmigo. Me preguntaban cómo se decía cebolla, cocina y pollo en inglés. La mayoría de los estudiantes en este grupo eran de mi edad, incluso descubrí que yo era solo siete días más joven que una de las chicas, llamada Genesis. Cuando nos anunciaron que trabajaríamos en parejas para plantar los jardines ornamentales, todos: Genesis, Michelle and Anahi querían ser mi pareja. Al finalizar la mañana no quería despedirme de mis amigos. Quería que fuésemos amigos para siempre y esperaba verlos al día siguiente.

Durante los dos días siguientes plantamos plantas y árboles medicinales con estudiantes un poco mayores que yo.  En estos días trabajamos en un grupo grande en vez de en parejas. Aunque a Genesis, Michelle y Anahi no se les asignó trabajo en el jardín de nuevo, yo los veía un poco y hablaba con ellos cuando iba a rellenar las botellas de agua con la manguera para las plantas. Un día después de hacer los jardines, cuando estábamos cargando las herramientas en el autobús, nos encontramos con niños pequeños fuera de la escuela. Hudi, una niña de seis años, me abrazaba y preguntaba: “¿por qué tu pelo es amarillo?”  En nuestra última mañana en la escuela pudimos dar clase sobre jardinería a los alumnos. Yo había estado planificando mis clases con Judy y mi madre durante las tardes anteriores. Tras estas clases con pequeños grupos, la escuela entera organizó una breve ceremonia en el patio para dar las gracias… y yo bailé.  Estaba sentada con nuestro grupo de jardinería mirando a los bailarines cuando un profesor se me acercó, me cogió de la mano y me llevó con los bailarines. Empezó a bailar y entonces yo comencé a bailar también.  A continuación, todos salieron y empezaron a bailar juntos: los profesores, todos los estudiantes y los jardineros. Nunca se me olvidará.

 

trenzado de cabello

trenzado de cabello

Después de bailar, me encontré rodeada de estudiantes que querían trenzar mi pelo.  Me senté con ellos y me hicieron unas trenzas preciosas. Ahora llega la parte triste…, cuando se acabó, los niños volvieron a sus clases y no pude despedirme de Genesis, Michelle y Anahi. Sin embargo, encontré a Hudi y nos hicimos una foto y nos abrazamos. No sé si volveré a verlos alguna vez, pero guardo los mejores recuerdos. 

Nos alojamos en la Posada Quinde.  Maggie y sus empleados eran como una familia. Me encantó la comida, los jardines y pasar el rato con Pacha, el perro fiel. Por las tardes, teníamos diferentes aventuras y excursiones. Hicimos un picnic y caminamos hasta La Cascada de Peguche. Visitamos la casa de un músico, hicimos nuestras propias flautas de pan y escuchamos a Jose Luiz y su familia tocar para nosotros  música ecuatoriana tradicional. Me gustó mucho visitar el taller cooperativo de esteras “Totora SISA”  y  el vivero en Morochos.  También fui a comprar un sombrero con  Brian a la Plaza de Ponchos. En nuestra última noche, tuvimos una cena de gala en una cabaña preciosa en las montañas llamada Casa Mojanda.  Había una banda tocando música tradicional y todos bailamos y tocamos algunos instrumentos de percusión. Judy es una gran bailarina. Tristemente, llegó la hora de ir al aeropuerto. Me hubiera gustado vivir una aventura más, como ir a las islas Galápagos con Jane. 

Estoy tan agradecida de haber tenido esta oportunidad. Me encantó conocer a Anna y su esposo John; y agradezco a la Fundación Tandana que me dejara venir como una joven voluntaria.  Es increíble lo que un grupo puede hacer al unísono; y espero poder planificar otro viaje a través de Tandana con amigos una vez esté en la escuela secundaria. Estoy agradecida a Pam y Denise por abrirme las puertas. Espero visitaros en La Universidad Estatal de Ohio (OSU, por sus siglas en inglés) muy pronto.

Pai!

Tu Mashi, (Vuestra amiga)

Nolita

 

Bonjour! Je m’appelle Nola Killpack et j’ai douze ans. Je viens tout juste de passer une semaine dans les régions montagneuses de l’Equateur avec un petit groupe de Maîtres jardiniers de l’Ohio et du Michigan. Je ne suis pas un Maître Jardinier mais ma mère m’avait invité  à participer comme bénévole. Ce séjour de service à travers la Fondation Tandana nous a permis d’être dans des communautés non pas comme des touristes mais comme des amis, et de travailler comme des partenaires. Je n’aurais jamais pu imaginer que je passerais la troisième semaine de Février de cette façon! Avant notre départ, je n’avais aucune idée de ce qui m’attendait. Je suis en train d’apprendre l’espagnol à l’école donc c’était l’endroit parfait pour pratiquer mon espagnol, et en effet quand je fus là-bas, j’ai même réfléchi en espagnol. J’ai également été mise au défi d’apprendre quelques mots de la langue autochtone Kichwa – ‘mashi’ veut dire ami et ‘pai’ veut dire merci, spécialement pour la nourriture. Miles, Megan and Mateo furent nos guides pour notre semaine d’expériences et d’aventures. Je me souviendrais toujours des séances de yoga avec Mateo (et La Cresia!) dans le jardin.  Megan m’a beaucoup aidé avec mon espagnol. Miles resta debout toute la nuit pour nous récupérer à l’aéroport de Quito à 03h30 du matin. Don Galo est le meilleur des conducteurs! J’ai adoré parler avec Maria Cristina parce que c’est une vraie Equatorienne!

Notre premier jour de travail fut le Dimanche. Nous nous rendîmes à Pastavi, une ville située à vingt-sept kilomètres au Nord de l’Equateur. Nous avons collaboré avec ce village pour planter environs130 arbres. La population espérait que ces arbres allaient embellir leur village et purifier l’air. Don Teofilo nous a montré à quelle profondeur planter les arbres et la quantité de compost à utiliser.  Comme je travaillais avec Hedy, j’ai pris plaisir à parler avec les enfants et à regarder les poulets et les chiens. Ce fut une journée très chaude passée à creuser et à transporter de l’eau, mais nous avons pu attendre avec impatience le déjeuner avec la communauté. Une minga est un rassemblement de la communauté pour travailler ensemble et elle est en général suivit d’une fête. Le déjeuner à notre minga fut très bon et eut lieu à la maison de Don Carlos et de Susana. Dans la cour intérieure, Susana étala des nattes de roseaux et posa des nappes au-dessus. Des membres de la communauté apportèrent de la nourriture à partager avec tout le monde.  Ils donnèrent leurs plats à Susanna qui les disposa sur la nappe.

alimentaire minga

alimentaire minga

Puis tous les invités et les membres de la communauté vinrent remplir leurs bols avec de la nourriture. La plupart d’entre nous avons utilisés nos doigts pour manger dans le bol. Il y avait des pommes de terre, du riz, des intestins de poulet, du poulet, du maïs, des œufs durs et du cresson. C’était drôle de mettre du pop-corn par-dessus! J’ai trouvé cela intéressant de goûter aux intestins de poulet et aux pommes de terre pleines de couleur cuisinées de diverses manières. Ce fut une source d’inspiration de voir que la présidente de ce village était une femme. La Présidente Inez donna un discours de remerciement qui fut suivit d’un message de St Valentin, en anglais, de la part Monica, l’étudiante boursière de Tandana. Lors de ce premier jour de travail, j’ai réalisé que c’était un privilège d’être intégrée à ce cercle de confiance qui avait déjà été créée entre la Fondation Tandana et cette communauté.

Cet après-midi-là, nous nous sommes retrouvés au bureau de Tandana et nous avons descendu une colline escarpée pour rejoindre l’école de cuisine Cocina Samyanuy. Nous avions été accueilli par Claudia et sa cousine Margarita. On enseigna à notre groupe comment faire des galettes de quinoa avec du jambon et des légumes, des salades avec des radis et des fèves de lupin (qui ne sont comestibles qu’après avoir été trempées durant plusieurs jours et rincées), des salades chaudes avec des carottes, choux fleurs et brocolis et poulet que nous avons cuit dans une poêle au-dessus d’un feu en plein air. Pour le dessert nous avons eu des quimbolitos, qui sont des sortes de purées à la semoule de maïs sucrées et onctueuses enveloppées dans une feuille de bananier et cuites à la vapeur. En boisson, on nous a servi du jus de fruit de la passion et de narangille.  En guise de friandise de St Valentin, Claudia avait confectionné des chocolats faits maisons!

jardins Samyanuy

jardins Samyanuy

Après notre cours de cuisine, Margarita, la cousine de Claudia nous a fait visiter leur potager et leur jardin d’herbes. Elle nous enseigna les noms des plantes et leurs usages médicinaux. Ensuite, Margarita nous donna un enseignement à propos la robe traditionnelle d’Otavalo et j’ai même dû en essayer une! La robe traditionnelle comprend un ruban noué dans les cheveux, des boucles d’oreille en or, des colliers en or et des bracelets rouges pour se protéger des mauvais esprits. Les femmes portent des blouses brodées sous des châles. Les femmes de plus de trente-cinq ans portent ces châles comme des foulards sur leurs têtes, les femmes célibataires l’attachent sur leur épaule gauche, les femmes mariées le mettent sur leur épaule droite, et les femmes âgées l’attachent au milieu. Les femmes portent des jupes appelées anacos. La partie du bas est de couleur blanche ou crème et représente le jour.  Le haut est noir ou bleu marine et représente la nuit. Pour tenir les anacos en place, les femmes utilisent deux ceintures. La plus grosse est appelée la mama chumbi et la plus petite est appelée la wawachumbi. Elles sont attachées fermement autour de la taille les unes sur les autres.

Claudia est mon modèle parce qu’elle a tellement de rêves. Contrairement à la plupart des gens, elle ne voit pas les rêves comme de simples rêves, mais comme un réel projet et elle travaille dure pour atteindre ses objectifs. Elle avait été une étudiante boursière dévouée à travers  Tandana et son rêve devint réalité quand elle ouvrit une école de cuisine. Maintenant, elle est en train de construire des chambres d’hôtes et elle espère pouvoir ouvrir un musée mettant en vitrine la technique traditionnelle de construction de maison en mur de boue séchée et de chaume.

Mon jour préféré fut le Lundi, le premier de nos quatre jours de travail à l’école Quichinche. Cette école compte environs sept cents élèves et nous avons aidé à planter des jardins d’agrément et de plantes médicinales et beaucoup d’arbres. Aussitôt que nous avons commencé à transporter les plants de la cours de l’école jusqu’en haut de la colline vers les jardins, des enfants commencèrent à me parler. Ils me demandèrent comment se disait oignon, cuisine et poulet en anglais. La plupart des élèves de ce groupe avaient mon âge et j’ai même appris que j’étais plus jeune de 7 jours qu’une fille qui s’appelait Genesis. Quand il nous a été annoncé que nous allions travailler avec des partenaires pour planter les plantes décoratives, Genesis, Michelle et Anahi tous ensembles voulaient être mon partenaire. A la fin de la matinée, je n’ai pas voulu dire au revoir à mes amies. Je souhaitais que nous puissions rester amies pour toujours et j’espérais les revoir le jour suivant.

la plantation de plantes médicinales dans les jardins scolaires Quichinche

la plantation de plantes médicinales dans les jardins scolaires Quichinche

Au cours des deux jours suivant nous avons planté des plantes médicinales et des arbres avec des élèves qui étaient un peu plus âgés que moi. Durant ces jours nous avions travaillé en grands groupes plutôt qu’avec des partenaires. Bien que Genesis, Michelle et Anahi ne fussent pas de nouveau affectées au jardin, je les aurais vues brièvement et j’aurais discuté avec elles lorsque je remplissais les bouteilles d’eau pour les plantes avec le tuyau. Un jour, après avoir jardiné et alors que nous chargions les outils dans le bus, nous avons rencontré quelques jeunes enfants à l’extérieur de l’école. Une jeune fille âgée de six ans qui s’appelait Hudi n’arrêtait pas de me serrer dans ses bras et de me demander “Pourquoi tes cheveux sont jaunes?” Lors de notre dernière matinée à l’école, nous avons pu donner aux élèves des leçons de jardinage. J’avais travaillé sur des programmes de cours avec Judy et ma mère durant les après-midi, un peu plus tôt dans la semaine. Après ces cours en petits groupes, l’école toute entière tient une cérémonie dans la cours de récréation pour nous remercier…..et j’y ai même dansé! J’étais assise avec notre groupe de jardinage à regarder les danseurs quand un professeur s’approcha, attrapa ma main et m’emmena vers les danseurs. Il commença à danser et je me suis donc mise à danser aussi! Puis tout le monde vint et commença à danser ensemble – les professeurs, tous les élèves et les jardiniers. Ce sera un souvenir inoubliable.

Après que nous ayons dansé, je fus entourée par des élèves qui voulaient natter mes cheveux. Je m’assis avec eux et je me suis retrouvée avec plein de jolies tresses. Nous en arrivons maintenant à la partie triste de l’histoire…quand ça s’est terminé, les enfants retournèrent à leurs classes et je n’ai jamais pu dire au revoir à Genesis, Michelle et Anahi! Mais j’ai pu retrouver Hudi et partager une photo et une embrassade avec elle.  Je ne sais pas si je les reverrais un jour, mais j’ai gardé les plus beaux des souvenirs!

Nous avons séjourné à La Posade del Quinde. Maggie et son personnel étaient comme de la famille. J’ai adoré la nourriture, les jardins et sortir avec Pacha, le chien fidèle. Durant les après-midi, on avait différentes aventures et balades.  Nous avons eu un pique-nique et  fait une randonnée jusqu’à “La Cascada de Peguche”. Nous avons visité la maison d’un musicien, fabriqué nos propres flûtes de pan et écouté Jose Luiz et sa famille nous jouer de la musique traditionnelle équatorienne. J’ai vraiment aimé visiter l’atelier coopératif de roseaux “Totora SISA” et la pépinière à Morochos. Je suis aussi allée acheter un chapeau avec Brian à la Plaza de Ponchos. Lors de notre dernière soirée, nous avons eu un grand diner dans une belle auberge dénommée Casa Mojandaon située sur le flanc de la montagne.  Il y avait un groupe qui jouait de la musique plus traditionnelle et nous avons tous dansés et joués quelques percussions. Judy est un danseur exceptionnel! Puis malheureusement, ce fût le moment de se diriger vers l’aéroport. J’aurais aimé vivre une aventure de plus – aller aux Galapagos avec Jane!

Je suis très reconnaissante d’avoir eu cette opportunité. J’ai bien aimé faire la connaissance d’Anna et de son mari John et j’apprécie que la Fondation  m’ait laissé me joindre à eux en tant que jeune bénévole. C’est incroyable ce qu’un groupe peut réaliser ensemble et j’espère que je pourrais faire un autre voyage avec Tandana avec des amis quand je serais à l’école secondaire. Je remercie Pam et Denise de m’avoir ouverte les portes pour les accompagner!  J’espère avoir encore l’occasion de vous rendre visite à OSU très bientôt!

Pai!

Tu Mashi, (Votre amie)

Nolita

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “A Young Volunteer Reports on her Ecuador Trip with Ohio State Master Gardeners

  1. Nola now participating in the power of the pen open to middle school students. I agree with those who think she has a creative future. I am so happy to be her great-aunt.

  2. What a nice esay written by a so young little miss. I would just wish to get so fluent with my English. And… congrats Nolita for that rewarding experience. Thanks for your great job and for sharing the volunteering notes.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s