Transforming Cotton and the Lives of Women: Cotton Banks in Sal-Dimi and Yarou Plateau, Mali

SAM_2830

By Susan Koller

SAM_2831Cotton is a vital resource for many women in the villages of Sal-Dimi and Yarou Plateau, Mali.  They transform raw cotton into cloth, which they sell to indigo dyers in neighboring villages to earn income. However, for a number of reasons cotton is not always available.  Women from these villages must travel to larger market towns to buy cotton. When it is available, they are often forced to buy it at high prices and can’t be sure of its quality. Tired of these struggles, women in both villages decided to set up their own cotton banks and asked Tandana to help. Tandana purchased a large stock of cotton for each cotton bank. This cotton is stored in a warehouse and is managed by a committee of women, selected by the assembly of all women in each village. Any woman in the village can purchase the cotton she needs on credit, and the committee records how much each woman owes.  Once the participants have sold the cloth, they repay the money they owe to the cotton bank.  The committee uses this fund to buy the cotton stock for the following year. This process continues year after year. Having the cotton banks in their villages means women have access to cotton year-round at an affordable price.

The cotton banks in both villages are now open. The management committees have divided the first stock among those who wanted to participate.  Women in both villages are excited about this new venture and are proud to have control over the cotton. Below are some comments from participants.

Yamouè Pamateck

Yamouè Pamateck

“I am very happy about the cotton bank in our village of Sal-Dimi.  We, the older women, we have been seeking this for a long time. Before, we had to go all the way to the markets of Ningari and Sangha in hopes of buying cotton.  Often we would travel for nothing, without finding enough cotton, or good enough quality cotton, and the price would be too high.  It didn’t satisfy our needs. . . .Now I can supply myself in my own village, and even without cash, in the Sal-Dimi cotton bank.  With the distribution of cotton from the bank, I can get the amount of cotton that I am able to transform, and now we women have a shade hangar and a storehouse where we can get together to exchange ideas and work cotton. . .  All of the women of Sal-Dimi and the surrounding villages will increase their earnings, especially the older women, since cotton transformation is the only income-generating activity that we older women can participate in.”

–Yamoué Pamateck from Sal-Dimi

 

Yapirei Pamacteck

Yapirei Pamacteck

“I don’t know how to thank The Tandana Foundation, Anna, or her friends. Every time I needed cotton, I had to take out a loan in Ningari for 2 or 3 lots.

The money I was earning after working it was inadequate; I was not making any money. Now, Tandana’s Cotton Bank has fallen down from the sky for us, I no longer need to borrow money from anyone.

A thousand thanks to The Tandana Foundation and its partners, thanks to whom we now have our own stock.”

–Yapirei Pamateck from Sal-Dimi

 

Kadia Samakan

Kadia Samakan

“We are now considered as women capable of generating income, thanks to Anna and our partnership with The Tandana Foundation, which helped us start the Savings for Change Groups. This is the first organization that has supported projects designed particularly for women, with, first the Savings for Change Groups, and today, the cotton bank. Long live The Tandana Foundation and its partners! It was my dream to see the implementation of the cotton bank, which was so desired by all the women of Yarou-Plateau. Now, thanks to The Tandana Foundation and its donors, all the women have access to good quality cotton at a good price anytime in our village.”

– Kadia Samakan, President of a Savings for Change Group in Yarou Plateau.  A Savings for Change Group is a group of women who get together weekly and contribute a designated amount of money to a savings fund. The group loans money from this fund to group members to help them start or expand small business ventures.

 

Sata Lafia Samakantraduit

Sata Lafia Samakan

“Yippee!!! What a good wind has brought us happiness this morning!

Finally, thanks to the partnership with The Tandana Foundation, we are now recognized by the organizations that support development. Before this, we were lost and unknown to development partners..

Come on, Come on, let’s dance to show our gratitude to The Tandana Foundation and its partners, to wish for a long life for our partnership and for the new cotton bank!”

– Sata Lafia Samakan, a Savings for Change Group member in Yarou Plateau.

 

The first step in starting a cotton bank is holding a series of meetings where the women of the village establish rules for the management of the cotton bank and choose the management committee. These initial meetings were held in Sal-Dimi March 4th to the 8th, and in Yarou Plateau March 12th to the 14th. These meetings were open to all women in each village and included representatives of the villages’ authorities and women who are members of other committees in the villages.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe management committees are made up of 7 to 8 members, including a president, a vice president, an accounts secretary, a treasurer, a sales secretary, a credit secretary, a dispute secretary, and an honorary President. The president presides over all meetings, especially meetings concerning requests for cotton. Both the accounts secretary and the treasurer are in charge of the cotton bank’s funds.

These committee appointments are unpaid positions. Committee members are reimbursed for any money they spend on activities relating to the cotton bank. Committee members can be monetarily rewarded for their service, but the amount of these rewards must be determined at a meeting attended by all the women involved in the cotton bank.

The accounts secretary and the sales secretary keep records on the days the cotton is distributed.  They keep records of the bank’s inventory, the amount of cotton distributed to each woman, and how much money each participant owes the bank.

Ada Kanambaye reviews the books.

Ada Kanambaye reviews the books.

In order to ensure that records are accurate, volunteer managers have also been appointed. Ada Kanambaye, a literacy instructor, is the manager of the bank in Sal-Dimi.  Elein Samakan, a teacher in the community, is manager of the bank in Yarou Plateau. Both of them have learned how to keep the management documents, so that they can support the secretaries in this task and double check the records.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Moussa Tembiné

Tandana’s Mali Operations Manager, Moussa Tembiné, provided training to the committee members on management of the cotton banks and accurate record-keeping.

The committee members in each village have distributed their first stock, and participants are in the process of transforming their raw cotton into cloth.

 

Por Susan Koller

Partage de coton par les femmes de Sal-Dimi par les membres de coton.El algodón es una fuente fundamental para muchas mujeres en las aldeas de Sal-Dimi y Yarou Plateau, Malí.  Ellas convierten el algodón crudo en tejido, el cual se vende a los tintoreros al índigo (aquellos que tinten de color índigo o azul los tejidos) de las aldeas cercanas para obtener ingresos. Sin embargo, por varias razones no siempre se dispone de algodón. Las mujeres de estas aldeas tienen que viajar a ciudades con mercados más grandes con el fin de comprar algodón. Cuando lo encuentran, a menudo están obligadas a comprarlo a precios altísimos y no pueden estar seguras de su calidad. Cansadas de estas luchas, las mujeres de ambas aldeas decidieron crear sus propios bancos de algodón y solicitar la ayuda de Tandana. Tandana compró un amplio suministro de algodón para cada banco de algodón. Este algodón se almacena en un almacén y lo dirige un comité de mujeres, seleccionado por la asamblea de las mujeres en cada aldea. Cualquier mujer en la aldea puede comprar a crédito el algodón que necesite y el comité anota la cantidad que cada mujer debe.  Una vez que las participantes han vendido el tejido, ellas devuelven el dinero que deben al banco de algodón. El comité utiliza este fondo para comprar el suministro de algodón para el año siguiente. Este proceso continúa así año tras año.  El hecho de tener los bancos de algodón en sus aldeas significa que las mujeres tienen acceso al algodón durante todo el año a un precio asequible.

Los bancos de algodón en ambas aldeas están ya abiertos. Los comités de dirección han dividido el primer suministro entre aquellas que querían participar. Las mujeres en ambas aldeas están muy emocionadas por esta nueva aventura y orgullosas de tener el control del algodón. A continuación se muestran los comentarios de algunas de las participantes.

 

Yamouè Pamateck

Yamouè Pamateck

“Estoy muy contenta de tener el banco de algodón en nuestra aldea Sal-Dimi. Nosotras, las mujeres mayores, hemos intentado lograr esto durante mucho tiempo. Anteriormente, teníamos que ir hasta los mercados de Ningari y Sangha con la esperanza de comprar algodón. A menudo viajábamos para nada, no encontrábamos algodón suficiente, ni algodón de buena calidad; y el precio era demasiado alto. No cubría nuestras necesidades. . . . Ahora puedo abastecerme en mi propia aldea, e incluso sin dinero en efectivo, en el banco de algodón de Sal-Dimi.  Con la distribución de algodón del banco, puedo obtener la cantidad de algodón que puedo transformar. Ahora las mujeres tenemos una nave cubierta y un almacén donde intercambiamos ideas y trabajamos el algodón. . .  Todas las mujeres de Sal-Dimi y los alrededores aumentarán sus ganancias, especialmente las mujeres mayores, ya que la conversión del algodón es la única actividad generadora de ingresos en la que las mayores pueden participar”.

–Yamoué Pamateck desde Sal-Dimi

 

Yapirei Pamacteck

Yapirei Pamacteck

“No sé cómo agradecer a La Fundación Tandana, Anna, o sus amigos. Cada vez que necesitábamos algodón, tenía que pedir un préstamo en Ningari por 2 o 3 lotes.

La cantidad de dinero que yo ganaba tras trabajar no era la adecuada; no ganaba nada. Ahora, el Banco de Algodón de Tandana nos ha caído del cielo, ya no necesito pedir préstamos a nadie.

Mil gracias a La Fundación Tandana y sus socios, gracias a los cuales ahora tenemos nuestro propio suministro”.

–Yapirei Pamateck desde Sal-Dimi

 

Kadia Samakan

Kadia Samakan

“Ahora se nos considera mujeres capaces de generar ingresos, gracias a Anna y nuestra colaboración con La Fundación Tandana, la cual nos ayudó a iniciar los Grupos de “Ahorrar para  lograr un cambio” (Savings for Change Groups). Esta es la primera organización que ha apoyado proyectos designados particularmente para mujeres, primero con los Grupos de “Ahorrar para longrar un cambio”, y hoy en día, el banco de algodón. ¡Larga vida a La Fundación Tandana y sus socios! Era mi sueño ver la puesta en práctica del banco de algodón, tan deseado por todas las mujeres de Yarou-Plateau. Ahora, gracias a La Fundación Tandana y sus donantes, todas las mujeres tienen acceso a algodón de buena calidad y a buen precio en nuestra aldea”.

– Kadia Samakan, Presidenta del Grupo de “Ahorrar para lograr un cambio” en Yarou Plateau. El Grupo de “Ahorrar para lograr un cambio” consiste en un grupo de mujeres que se reunen semanalmente y contribuyen con una cantidad designada de dinero a un fondo de ahorro. El grupo presta dinero de este fondo a grupos para ayudarles a iniciar o expandir pequeños negocios.

 

Sata Lafia Samakantraduit

Sata Lafia Samakan

“¡Yupi! ¡Qué felicidad esta mañana!

Por ultimo, gracias a la colaboración con La Fundación Tandana, ahora  las organizaciones que apoyan el desarrollo nos reconocen. Anteriormente, no éramos nadie para los socios de desarrollo…

¡Vamos, vamos, bailemos para mostrar nuestra gratitud a La Fundación Tandana y sus socios, para desear una larga vida a nuestra colaboración con el nuevo banco de algodón!”.

– Sata Lafia Samakan, miembro del Grupo de “Ahorrar para lograr un cambio” en Yarou Plateau.

 

El primer paso para crear el banco de algodón es llevar acabo una serie de reuniones donde las mujeres de la aldea establecen las normas para la gestión del banco de algodón y eligen un comité de dirección. Estas primeras reuniones tuvieron lugar en Sal-Dimi del 4 al 8 de marzo y en Yarou Plateau del 12 al 14 de marzo. Estas reuniones estuvieron abiertas a todas las mujeres de cada aldea e incluyeron representantes de las autoridades de las aldeas y mujeres que son miembros de otros comités en las aldeas.

Los comités de dirección lo forman de 7 a 8 miembros, incluyendo una presidenta, una vicepresidenta, una secretaria de contabilidad, una tesorera, una secretaria de ventas, una secretaria de crédito, una secretaria de conflictos y una presidenta honoraria. La presidenta preside todas las reuniones, especialmente las relacionadas con los pedidos de algodón. Tanto la secretaria de contabilidad como la tesorera están a cargo de los fondos del banco de algodón.

Estos puestos de comité no son remunerados. A los miembros del comité se les reembolsa cualquier dinero empleado en actividades relacionadas con el banco de algodón. A los miembros del comité se les puede recompensar monetariamente por su servicio; sin embargo, la cantidad de estas compensaciones debe ser determinada en una reunión a la que asisten todas las mujeres involucradas en el banco de algodón.

La secretaria de contabilidad y la secretaria de ventas llevan un registro de los días en que el algodón ha sido distribuido. Ellas llevan el registro del inventario del banco, la cantidad de algodón distribuida a cada mujer y cuánto dinero debe al banco cada participante.

Ada Kanambaye

Ada Kanambaye

Con el fin de asegurar que los registros son rigurosos, se han designado gerentes voluntarias. Ada Kanambaye, una instructora de alfabetización, es la gerente del banco en Sal-Dimi.  Elein Samakan, una profesora de la comunidad, es gerente del banco en Yarou Plateau. Ambas han aprendido a llevar los documentos de gestión, para poder apoyar en esta tarea a las secretarias y también comprobar los registros.

Moussa Tembiné

Moussa Tembiné

El director de Operaciones en Malí de Tandana, Moussa Tembiné, proporcionó formación a los miembros del comité sobre la gestión de los bancos de algodón y el mantenimiento de registros.

Los miembros del comité de cada aldea han distribuido su primer suministro, y los participantes se encuentran en el proceso de convertir su algodón crudo en tejido.

 

Par Susan Koller

Partage de coton par les femmes de Sal-DimiLe coton est une ressource vitale pour beaucoup de femmes dans les villages de Sal Dimi et Yarou Plateau, mali. Elles transforment le coton brut en textile, qu’ils vendent aux teinturiers dans les villages voisins pour gagner un revenu. Cependant, pour plusieurs raisons, le coton n’est pas toujours disponible. Des femmes de ces villages doivent voyager aux bourgs plus grandes pour se procurer du coton. Dès qu’il est disponible, elles sont souvent obligées de l’acheter à un prix plus élevé, sans être certaines de la quantité du produit. Ayant marre de ces luttes, des femmes deux deux villages ont décidé d’établir leurs propres banques du coton et ont demandé de l’aide à Tandana. Tandana a acheté un grand stock de coton pour chaque banque de coton. Ce coton est rangé dans un entrepôt géré par une comité de femmes, désignées par l’assemblage de toutes les femmes dans chaque village.  Toute femme dans le village a le droit d’acheter le coton dont elle a besoin au crédit, et la comité enregistre le montant dû par chaque femme. Dès que les participants vendent le textile, elles remboursent l’argent dû. La comité ensuite utilise ce fonds pour acheter le coton stock pour l’année suivante. Ce processus se répète chaque an. Avoir les banques de coton dans leurs villages permet aux femmes d’accéder au coton tout au long de l’année.

Les banques de coton dans les deux villages sont désormais ouvertes. La comité de gestion a divisé le premier stock parmi celles qui voulaient y participer. Les femmes dans les deux villages sont très ravies de cette nouvelle entreprise et fières d’avoir contrôle sur le coton.  Veuillez trouver ci-dessous quelques commentaires des participantes.

Yamouè Pamateck

Yamouè Pamateck

«Je suis tellement heureuse de la nouvelle banque de coton dans notre village Sal-Dimi. Nous, les vieilles femmes cherchons cela depuis longtemps. Auparavant, on avait toujours voyagé très loin aux marchés de Ningari et Sangha dans l’espoir d’acheter du coton. Des fois, on a voyagé pour rien; des fois nous avons pas trouvé assez du coton, ou un coton de bonne qualité, ou des fois, le coton était trop chers. Il n’a pas satisfait nos besoins… mais là je peux me fournir dans mon propre village, même sans argent en espèces, dans la banque de coton à Sal Dimi. Grâce à la distribution du coton de la banque, je peux acquérir la quantité de coton duquel je suis capable de transformer, et maintenant nous les femmes avons un _____ et un entrepôt dans lesquels nous pouvons nous rassembler pour échanger nos idées et travailler le coton…. toutes les femmes de Sal-Dimi et les villages voisins vont augmenter leurs revenus, surtout les vieilles femmes, puisque la transformation du coton est la seule activité génératrice de revenus dans laquelle nous pouvons participer.»

–Yamoué Pamateck de Sal-Dimi

«Je ne sais pas comment remercier La Fondation Tandana, Anna, ou ses partenaires.

Yapirei Pamacteck

Yapirei Pamacteck

Chaque fois que j’ai besoin de coton, il fallait toujours prendre un prêt pour deux ou trois tas de coton.

Les bénéfices que je gagnais après travailler était inadéquate; je gagnais aucun argent. Mais là, la banque de coton de Tandana  a tombé du ciel pour nous, et je n’ai plus besoin d’emprunter de l’argent.

Mille mercis à La Fondation Tandana et ses partenaires, car grâce à eux, nous avons maintenant notre propre stock.»

–Yapirei Pamateck de Sal-Dimi

Kadia Samakan

Kadia Samakan

«Nous sommes désormais considérées comme femmes capables de générer des revenus, grâce à Anna et notre partenariat avec La Fondation Tandana, qui nous a aidé commencer le groupe Économies pour le Changement. Elle est la première association qui a soutenu des projets destinées aux besoins des femmes en particulier, avec, en premier lieu, les groupes d’Économies pour le Changement et aujourd’hui, la banque du coton. Vive La Fondation Tandana et tous ses partenaires! Il était mon rêve d’assister à la réalisation de la banque du coton, qui était désirée par toutes les femmes de Yarou Plateau. Là, grâce à La Fondation Tandana et tous ses donateurs, toutes les femmes peuvent maintenant accéder au coton de bonne qualité n’importe quand dans notre village.»

– Kadia Samakan, présidente d’un groupe d’Économies pour le Changement à Yarou Plateau. Un groupe d’Économies pour le Changement est un groupe de femmes qui se rencontrent chaque semaine et contribuent à un fonds d’épargne. Ce groupe prête de l’argent de ce fonds aux membres du groupe pour les aider  à démarrer ou agrandir des petites entreprises. 

Sata Lafia Samakan

Sata Lafia Samakan

“Yippee!!! Quel bon vent nous a apporté le bonheur ce matin!

Finalement, grâce au partenariat avec La Fondation Tandana, nous sommes maintenant reconnus par les associations qui soutiennent le développement. Autrefois, nous étions perdus et inconnus aux partenaires du développement.

Venez, venez, dansons pour montrer notre gratitude à lL Fondation Tandana et ses partenaires pour souhaiter pour la longévité pour notre partenariat et pour la nouvelle banque de coton!»

– Sata Lafia Samakan, un membre d’Économies pour le Changement à Yarou Plateau.

La première étape pour commencer une banque de coton est tenir une série de réunions où les femmes du village établissent des règles sur la gestion de la banque de coton et choisissent la comité de gestion. Ces réunions initiales ont eu lieu à Sal-Dimi du 4 mars au 8 mars, et à Yarou Plateau du 12 mars au 14 mars. Ces réunions ont été ouvertes à toutes les femmes de chaque village et ont comprises représentatives de l’autorité des villages et les femmes qui sont membres des comités d’autres villages.

Les comités de gestion sont composées de 7 à 8 membres, comprennent une présidente, une vice-présidente, une secrétaire de comptes, une trésorière, une secrétaire de ventes, une secrétaire de crédit, une secrétaire de différends, et une présidente d’honneur. La présidente préside toutes les réunions, avant tout les réunions concernant demandes de coton. Le secrétaire de comptes et la trésorière sont chargées de fonds de la banque de coton.

Les positions de la comité sont non rénumerées. Les membres de la comité sont remboursées pour n’importe quel de leur propre argent dépensé aux activités concernant la banque de coton. Les membres de la comité peuvent être récompensées financièrement pour leur service, mais la  quantité de ces compensations  doit être déterminée à une réunion assistée par toutes les femmes concernées dans les affaires de la banque du coton.

La secrétaire de comptes et la secrétaire de ventes tiennent des dossiers les jours que le coton est distribué. Dossiers de l’inventorie de la banque, la quantité de coton distribué à chaque femme, et la quantité d’argent que chaque participante doit à la banque. 

 

Ada Kanambaye reviews the books.

Ada Kanambaye

Afin d’assurer que les dossiers soient exactes, des gestionnaires bénévoles ont été désignés. Ada Kanambaye, une instructrice de l’alphabétisation, est la responsable de la banque à Sal-Dimi. Elein Samakan, une professeure dans la communauté, est la responsable de la banque à Yarou Plateau. Les deux ont appris gérer des documents, pour qu’elles puissent soutenir les secrétaires  à faire cette tâche et vérifier les dossiers.

Moussa Tembiné

Moussa Tembiné

Le directeur d’opérations de Tandana au Mali, Moussa Termbiné, a fourni de la formation aux membres de la comité concernant la gestion des banques de coton et l’enregistrement de dossiers précisés.

Les membres de la comité dans chaque village ont distribué leur premier stock, et les participants sont en train de transformer leur coton brut en textile.

 

 

SAM_2537

 

 

Advertisements

One thought on “Transforming Cotton and the Lives of Women: Cotton Banks in Sal-Dimi and Yarou Plateau, Mali

  1. Love the picture of Sata Lafia- what joy in her dance!! What a wonderful empowering project for these women. Proud of Tandana!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s