Composting lessons, planting acacias at 11,500 feet, laughs with new friends–all in a day’s work on a Gardening Volunteer Vacation

 

Main picture

 

It’s been 4 days so far in Otavalo with Tandana for a gardening volunteer vacation and it’s been a whirlwind of new information, an onslaught to the senses, and an overwhelming level of immediate friendship among the 13 gardeners and gardening enthusiasts involved.

The first day was a day of orientation, a visit to the famous Otavalo open air market, and some lessons on the culture, the language, and our first group dinner.  For some of us, the market was our first experience with “haggling” to any great extent and some were much more successful than others and had to share our methods for future use.

We awoke on day 2, Sunday, for our first ride to the vivero (nursery/greenhouse) and our first meeting with Matias who presides over the general operations of the vivero.   The views kept many of us mesmerized for the ride to 10,465’ of elevation.

We were doing our best to practice the phrases and language translations that Tyler (Tandana intern) was so skilled in giving us.  Volunteer Mike promptly began creating mnemonics for some of the phrases that we found difficult to cement to memory.  Such as when walking along a path and getting bored, creating a yawn then being struck by lightening thus became a shocking-yawn = chaquiñan, which is a footpath.  No one ever said the language was going to be an easy part of the adventure!

At the vivero, we weeded beds, weeded seedlings, reinforced the greenhouse, and learned how to function without passing out at +10,000’ for the first timegardening4.  A crew of 4-5 highly capable women pulled some of the most intense grass we’ve ever seen from the topsoil mounds that Matias uses for potting trees.

The afternoon and evening we spent at a cooking school run by a previous Tandana scholarship recipient named Claudia who taught us local recipes, helped us understand some of the local herbs, fruits, and vegetables that are used in every household in the area.

During one point in the evening after the fantastic meal was consumed, volunteers Brenda and Irene were discussing a substitution for guinea pig in Claudia’s cookbook with Claudia.  Brenda suggested that rabbit might work.  Claudia’s horrified reaction to the consumption of rabbit was only reinforced as Irene stated that they eat rabbit in many French dishes and Brenda stated that her son hunted wild rabbit.   Claudia stated that they NEVER eat rabbit in Ecuador and was completely stunned that we do in the United States.  The horrification continued as volunteer Natasha came into the kitchen and proceeded to imitate a bunny ears and hop for Claudia who began to laugh uncontrollably because she realized that she thought that we were eating RATS and not the rabbit as suggested.  The confusion became clear and laughter brought all 4 women to tears at the thought that we were hunting and eating rats and that the French had really made it popular.

On day 3 we loaded our trusty bus and headed to the village of Muenala to plant trees and work with their local officials.  We scurried along amazingly steep slopes at 11,500’ to dig holes and plant 500 acacia trees wherever the president of Muenala directed us to.  Volunteer Steve proclaimed he would dig 100 holes and most all of us are certain hetree succeeded!  After 4+ hours of digging we were treated to a fantastic communal meal with the village officials.  Just as we were finishing and ready to load the bus back down the mountain, the clouds began to roll in and shrouded our location in a peaceful white blanket.  Before ending the day we had a most interesting visit with traditional healer, Abuelita, age 93.  She healed volunteer Hope and gave direct orders for the note taking of many healing remedies for various ailments at the entertainment of everyone including Tandana founder Anna.  The group was also given strict instructions as to the herbs they should have brought down from the mountain that day but did not!

Day 4 took us up to the hills around Otavalo where we cut suckers off Alder trees for Matias to use for propagation.  Steve became the climber of the ladder to reach the highest possible suckers and increase the count for Matias.  Lunch was another fantastic meal at Claudia’s where we dined on more traditional foods along with adding popcorn to our soup instead of crackers as we would in the US.  We ended day 4 with a trip to Cotacachi and the streets filled with leather stores and a wonderful meal at a local restaurant.

Back at the Quinde, Claire was noted as being 100% correct, Mike provided us a preview of his video on the importance of proper hydration at altitude, and volunteer Shyamala renamed Claire to be forever Clarita.

We have 3 more days ahead and we are all sure that it will be nothing short of memorable and hilarious.

So much gets packed into our days and it’s an excellent thing that I took pictures of the white boards that Claire posted for us each evening to detail the coming day’s activities.  (That’s a tip in case you missed it!)

Tuesday began busily in the hills around Otavalo in Panecillo where we cut suckers from Alder trees that Anna planted in 1999 during one of her first projects in the area.  Matias demonstrated the proper technique and quality of cuttings he desired and we were able to cut 750 pieces that he then rooted into pots at the vivero.

We spent the afternoon and evening at the town of Cotacachi and the land of amazing leather stores.  If you love quality leather goods (purses, jackets, shoes, etc.) be sure to bring an extra $100+ because it’s amazing quality but not inexpensive for such beautiful items.  Be sure to get some incredible coffee to take home at the Café Intag store right off the town square and visit the gift shop to the left for some quality hand made items by a wonderful woman.

gardening10Wednesday’s adventure took us by bus to the Guachinguero school where some of us helped in the school garden and some of us worked with three boys, ages 10-12 on planting quinoa on a near vertical slope next to the school.  Using traditional hoes, 4 American women scattering seeds could not keep up with 3 boys hoeing the side of that hill!

 

In the school garden, flowers were moved, shrubs were moved, and a hedge of lantana were planted around the border.  The size of the grubs in the soil amazed many of us including the one that was larger than our thumbs.

After the gardening and planting was finished, the children were broken out into 3 groups by grade and rotated through 3 different gardening sessions.  One group developed a program to demonstrate the available water in the world using an apple, one group demonstrated seed starting in the shell of a mandarin orange, and the third group demonstrated the ease of composting.  The teacher was so impressed with the compost lesson she has stated that she will be finding a location to compost what the school produces.

Lunch was a fantastic meal of traditional quinoa soup made by one of the school moms.  Her hand carved wooden ladle could strike fear into misbehaving children everywhere.

The afternoon was a tour of the Otavalo location for the Falcon Farms rose plantation.  The plantation is 67 acres of rose production 100% under plastic, full drip irrigation, and Rainforest Alliance Certified for minimal use of pesticides and herbicides.  Each root stock and grafted rose variety produces roses for an average of 17 years.  Each acre of the plantation can produce 2.5 million roses per year!  The manager of the plantation was absolutely fantastic and has forever changed the name of the rose flower food packet to rose Viagra.  The manager graciously sent us away with 8 bouquets of roses including some for volunteer Thea from her husband Steve in honor of their 50th wedding anniversary!  The other bouquets were separated by the interns and delivered to their host moms and one bouquet of the manager’s favorite variety was given to Maggie at our hotel for all her hospitality

On Thursday, Matias was happy to have us return and help fill the new bed inside the greenhouse with potted seeds while others of us continued pulling weeds from the many potted trees outside.  We presented him with the news that the group pooled their money to purchase windows for his new building and Debbie gave him a hammer, handsaw, and retractable tape measure, which left him speechless.  He was most grateful he won’t have to use a rock to pound things in anymore!

We went to witness the unbelievable skill of the Master Weaver Miguel.  From sheep to loom, we were able to see the whole process.  Bring some extra cash for this visit as well because his incredible pieces are irresistible but range in price from $10-$500.  If you are staying at Maggie’s hotel (La Posada del Quinde), she has many of his pieces on display for sale.

We wrapped up the evening with an incredible meal at Puerto Lago and the giving of our official Tandana volunteer t-shirts along with some incredible heartfelt words from the staff.  We are all touched by what they said about each of us and could never believe that so much talent lies within the capable hands of the Tandana interns.

Today is Friday and we are packing and loading for a stop at the actual equator (not the tourist spot), a picnic lunch, a visit to the orchid grower in Quito and then dinner as we all start to part ways.

These type of volunteer vacations are not for everyone but everyone that participates goes home with more than they ever imagined and grows in ways they never expected.

Sign up, you won’t ever regret it.

Brenda Owen

Brenda Owen

Brenda Owen, Michigan, Garden Volunteer Vacation

October 2014

 

 

 

 

Apenas han pasado cuatro días en Otavalo con Tandana de las vacaciones de voluntariado de jardinería y ha sido un torbellino de nueva información, una arremetida para los sentidos, y un nivel abrumador de amistad inmediata entre los trece jardineros y los apasionados por la jardinería involucrados.

 El primer día fue la orientación, una visita al famoso mercado de Otavalo y algunas lecciones de cultura, idioma, y nuestra primera cena de grupo. Para algunos de nosotros el mercado fue nuestra primera experiencia con el regateo hasta cierto punto; algunos tuvieron más éxito que otros y compartieron sus métodos para usarlos en el futuro.

 Nos despertamos el segundo día, domingo, para nuestro primer viaje al vivero y nuestra primera reunión con Matías, quien preside las operaciones generales del vivero. Las vistas nos dejaron fascinados a la mayoría por el trayecto a 10.465 pies de altitud.

 Hacíamos lo mejor que podíamos para practicar las frases y traducciones que Tyler (pasante de Tandana) nos había dado tan hábilmente.  El voluntario Mike inmediatamente comenzó a crear estrategias nemotécnicas para algunas de las frases que encontrábamos difíciles de retener en la memoria. Tal como cuando caminábamos por el camino y nos aburríamos, bostezábamos, luego éramos golpeados por una tempestad; de este modo se convirtió en un impactante-bostezo = chacquinan el cual significa sendero. ¡Nadie dijo que la lengua iba a ser una parte fácil de la aventura!

gardening5 En el vivero, sacábamos la mala hierba de los lechos y de las plantas del semillero, reforzábamos el invernadero, y aprendíamos cómo trabajar sin desmayarnos a más de 10.000 pies por primera vez. Una cuadrilla de 4 ó 5 mujeres muy competentes sacó alguna de la hierba más intensa que jamás habíamos visto de los montículos de mantillo que Matías usa para plantar árboles.

 La tarde la pasamos en la escuela de cocina dirigida por una antigua becaria de Tandana llamada Claudia, quien nos enseñó recetas locales y nos ayudó a conocer algunas de las hierbas, frutas y verduras locales que se usan en cada hogar de la zona.

 

Durante un momento de la noche después de que la fantástica comida fuera devorada, las voluntarias Brenda e Irene discutían con Claudia la sustitución del cuy en su libro de recetas. Brenda sugirió que el conejo podía servir. La reacción horrorizada de Claudia al consumo de conejo fue fortalecida mientras Irene afirmaba que en muchos platos franceses se come conejo y Brenda revelaba que su hijo cazaba conejos salvajes. Claudia manifestó que en Ecuador NUNCA comen conejo y que estaba totalmente estupefacta al saber que lo hacíamos en los Estados Unidos. El horror continuó cuando la voluntaria Natasha llegó a la cocina y empezó a imitar los saltitos y las orejas de un conejo para Claudia, quien comenzó a reír descontroladamente porque se dio cuenta de que había pensado que comíamos RATAS y no conejo como habíamos sugerido. La confusión se aclaró y la risa llevó a las cuatro mujeres a las lágrimas por la idea de que cazábamos y comíamos ratas y que los franceses lo habían hecho verdaderamente popular.

 El tercer día cargamos nuestro leal bus y nos dirigimos a la aldea de Muenala a plantar árboles y trabajar con los funcionarios locales. Nos apresuramos por laderas increíblemente empinadas a 11.500 pies para cavar agujeros y plantar 500 acacias a donde fuera que el presidente de Muenala nos dirigiera.tree1 El voluntario Steve anunció que cavaría 100 agujeros y casi todos estamos seguros de que lo consiguió. Después de más de cuatro horas excavando nos obsequiaron con una comida comunitaria fantástica con los funcionarios de la aldea. Justo cuando estábamos terminando y preparándonos para cargar el bus de regreso a la montaña, las nubes comenzaron a moverse y envolvieron donde nos encontrábamos en una apacible manta blanca. Antes de terminar el día tuvimos una visita más que interesante con una curandera, Abuelita (de 93 años). Ella sanó a la voluntaria Hope  y dio órdenes directas para la toma de notas de muchos remedios curativos para varias dolencias para el entretenimiento de todos incluyendo la fundadora de Tandana, Anna. También nos dieron estrictas instrucciones sobre las hierbas que se deberían haber traído de la montaña aquel día pero no se hizo.

 El cuarto día nos llevó hasta las colinas alrededor de Otavalo donde cortamos retoños de alisos para que Matías los usara para la reproducción. Steve se convirtió en el escalador para alcanzar los más altos retoños posibles y aumentar el recuento de Matías. El almuerzo fue otra comida fantástica en la casa de Claudia donde comimos platos más tradicionales a la vez que añadimos palomitas a nuestra sopa en lugar de ‘crackers’ como haríamos en los EEUU. Terminamos el cuarto día con un viaje a Cotacachi y las calles llenas de tiendas de cuero y una comida maravillosa en un restaurante local.

 De vuelta en el Quinde, Claire demostró que tenía razón al 100%, Mike nos brindó con una vista previa de su vídeo sobre la importancia de la hidratación en alturas elevadas, y la voluntaria Shyamala renombró a Claire Clarita para siempre.

 Tenemos tres días más delante y todos estamos seguros de que será poco menos que inolvidable y divertidísimo.

 Demasiadas cosas llenan nuestros días, y es una idea excelente que tomé fotos de las pizarras blancas que Claire puso para nosotros cada noche detallando las actividades de los días siguientes (¡Ese es un consejo, en caso de que lo hubieras dejado pasar!) 

El martes comenzó afanosamente en las colinas que rodean Otavalo en Panecillo donde cortamos los retoños de aliso que Anna plantó en 1999, durante uno de sus primeros proyectos en la zona. Matías nos demostró la técnica correcta y la calidad de corte que el deseaba; fuimos capaces de cortar 750 piezas que después él enraizó en macetas en el vivero.

Pasamos la tarde y la noche en la ciudad de Cotacachi y la tierra de las impresionantes tiendas de cuero. Si le gustan los productos de cuero de buena calidad (bolsos, chaquetas, zapatos, etc.) asegúrese de llevar unos 100 dólares extra porque son de una calidad extraordinaria, pero nada caros para artículos de tal belleza. Asegúrese de tomar el increíble café para llevar en la tienda del Café Intag junto a la plaza de la ciudad y visitar la tienda de regalos a la izquierda para comprar artículos artesanales de calidad hechos por una mujer maravillosa.

 La aventura del miércoles nos llevó en bus a la escuela de Guachinguero donde algunos de nosotros ayudamos en el jardín de ésta y otros trabajamos con tres niños de 10 a 12 años plantando quínoa en una ladera vertical colindante a la escuela. gardening9Usando azadas, ¡cuatro mujeres estadounidenses diseminando semillas no podían seguir el ritmo de los tres chicos cavando la ladera de esa colina! 

En el jardín de la escuela se trasladaron las flores y los arbustos, y se plantó un seto de lantanas alrededor del borde. El tamaño de las larvas en la tierra nos impresionó a muchos incluyendo uno que era más grande que nuestros pulgares.

 Después de terminar de plantar y el trabajo de jardinería, se separó a los niños en tres grupos por cursos y se les hizo rotar por tres sesiones de jardinería diferentes. Un grupo desarrolló un programa para demostrar el agua disponible en el mundo usando una manzana, otro demostró la semilla a partir de la cáscara de un tipo de mandarina, y un tercero demostró la facilidad de hacer abono. La maestra estaba tan impresionada con la lección de abono que aseguró que encontraría un lugar para convertir en abono lo que la escuela produce.

 El almuerzo fue una fantástica sopa tradicional de quínoa hecha por una de las madres de la escuela. Su cacillo de madera tallado a mano podría atemorizar a los niños desobedientes de cualquier lugar.

 Por la tarde hicimos un tour al plantío de rosas de la granja Falcon en Otavalo. Consiste en una producción de 67 acres (27,1139 hertáreas) de rosas cubiertas por plástico en su totalidad, sistema completo de irrigación por goteo, y la Certificación de la Alianza de Selva Tropical al uso mínimo de pesticidas y herbicidas. Cada rizoma y variedad de rosal injertado produce rosas por un promedio de diecisiete años. ¡Cada acre de la plantación puede producir dos millones y medio de rosas al año! El gerente de la plantación fue completamente sensacional y cambió para siempre el nombre del fertilizante para rosas por el de Viagra rosa. El gerente gentilmente nos despidió con ocho ramos de rosas que incluían algunas para la voluntaria Thea de parte de su marido Steve en honor a sus bodas de oro. Los otros ramos fueron separados por los pasantes y entregados a sus madres de acogida; y un bouquet con la variedad preferida del gerente se le entregó a Maggie en nuestro hotel por toda su hospitalidad.

 El jueves, Matías estaba feliz de tenernos de vuelta para poder ayudar a rellenar el nuevo lecho dentro del invernadero con semillas en macetas mientras otros continuaron sacando las malas hierbas de muchos árboles en macetas afuera. Le informamos de que el grupo reunió su dinero para comprar ventanas para su nuevo edificio y que Debbie le daba un martillo, una sierra de mano, y una cinta métrica retráctil, lo cual le dejó sin palabras. ¡Él estaba más que agradecido de que ya no tendría que utilizar una piedra para pesar cosas nunca más!

 Fuimos a presenciar la increíble habilidad del Maestro Tejedor Miguel. Desde las ovejas hasta el telar, pudimos ver todo el proceso. Traiga algo de dinero extra para esta visita también porque sus extraordinarias piezas son irresistibles, pero su precio varía de 10 a 500 dólares. Si se hospeda en el hotel de Maggie, ella tiene muchas de sus piezas expuestas para la venta.

 Cerramos la noche con una comida increíble en Puerto Lago y la entrega de nuestras camisetas oficiales a los voluntarios de Tandana junto a algunas palabras sentidas del personal. Todos estamos conmovidos por lo que dijeron sobre cada uno de nosotros, y nunca podríamos creer que hubiera tanto talento dentro de las diestras manos de los pasantes de Tandana.

 Hoy es viernes y estamos empacando y cargando para hacer una parada en el ecuador real (no el lugar turístico), un almuerzo al aire libre, una visita al viticultor de orquídeas en Quito y luego la cena mientras todos comenzamos a separarnos.

 Este tipo de vacaciones de voluntariado no son para cualquiera, pero todos los que participan vuelven a casa con más de lo que jamás habían imaginado y crece en formas que nunca habían esperado.

 Apúntate y no te arrepentirás.

Brenda Owen

Brenda Owen

 Brenda Owen, Michigan,  Voluntaria de Gardening Volunteer Vacation

Octubre, 2014

 

 

Ça fait 4 jours en Otavalo avec Tandana pour lesjardinages vacances bénévoles et il a été un tourbillon de nouvelles informations, une attaque des sens, et un niveau d’amitié complètement accablant entre les 13 jardiniers et les passionnés de jardinage impliqué.

 Le premier jour était le jour d’orientation, une visite au marché en plein air célèbre en Otavalo, et quelques leçons de la culture, la langue, et le premier dîner en groupe. Pour certains d’entre nous, le marché était notre première expérience avec « le marchandage » dans une grande mesure et quelques personnes avait beaucoup plus de succès que les autres et avait besoin de partager leurs méthodes pour utiliser à l’avenir.

Nous nous sommes réveilles le 2eme jour, dimanche, pour notre premier tour au vivero (une pépinière/une serre) et notre première rencontre avec Matais qui préside sur les opérations générales du vivero. Les vues gardé beaucoup d’entre nous hypnotisé pour le tour de 10,465 pieds d’élévation.

 Nous faisons notre mieux de pratiquer les phrases et les traductions de la langue que Tyler (un stagiaire de Tandana) était si habile a nous donner. Mike le volontaire a commencé rapidement de créer moyen mnémotechnique pour certains des phrases que nous avons trouvées difficiles pour aider à mémoriser. Par exemple, lors de la marche le long d’un chemin, et s’ennuyer, en créant un bâillement et puis être frappé par la foudre est devenu un « un bâillement choquant » = chacquinan qui est un sentier. Personne n’a jamais dit que la langue allait être la partie la plus facile de l’aventure !

 gardening3Au vivero, nous avons désherbé des plates-bandes, des jeunes plants, renforcé la serre, et appris à fonctionner sans perte de connaissance à 10,000 pieds d’altitude pour la première fois. Une équipe de 4-5 des femmes capables tiré une partie de l’herbe la plus intense que nous ayons jamais vu monticules de terre végétale que Matais utilise pour emporter les arbres.

 Cet après-midi et soirnous avons passé à une école de cuisine gérée par un bénéficiaire Tandana de bourse précédente qui s’appelle Claudia qui nous a appris les recettes locales, nous a aidés à comprendre certaines des herbes locales, des fruits, et des légumes qui sont utilisés dans chaque maison dans la région. 

Au cours d’un point de la soirée après un repas fantastique a été consommé, bénévoles Brenda et Irene discutaient une substitution pour le cochon d’inde dans le livre de cuisine de Claudia, avec Claudia. Brenda suggéré qu’un lapin était une possibilité. La réaction horrifiée de Claudia à la consommation de lapin n’a été renforcé parIrene quand elle a dit qu’ils mangent le lapin dans la cuisine française et Brenda a dit que son fis chasse des lapins sauvages. Claudia a dit qu’ils ne mangent jamais les lapins en Équateuret a été complètement abasourdi que nous les mangeons aux Etas Unis. L’horrification poursuivie comme bénévole Natasha est venu dans la cuisine et a procédé à imiterles oreilles de lapin et hop pour Claudia qui a commencé a rigoler parce qu’elle s’est rendu compte qu’elle a pensé que nous mangions des rats et pas des lapins ! La confusion est devenu clair et le rire a tous les 4 femmes aux larmes à la pensée qu’ils étaient à la chasse et à manger des rats et que les Français l’avait rendu populaire.

 Le troisième jour, nous avons chargé notre van fidèle et sont allés au village de Muenala à planter des arbres et travailler avec leurs fonctionnaires villageois. tree2Nous nous hâtions le long de des pentes abruptes à 11,500 pieds pour creuser et planter 500 des arbres acacia où que le directeur de Muenala nous a indiqué les planter. Bénévole Steve a proclamé qu’il allait creuser 100 trous et la plus part d’entre nous sont certaines qu’il réussira ! Après 4+ heurs de creusement, nous avons eu un repas commun fantastique avec les fonctionnaires du village. Tout comme nous finissions et prêt à charger le bus vers le bas de la montagne, les nuages ​​ont commencé à rouler vers nous et enveloppées notre emplacement dans une couverture blanche. Avant la fin de la journée nous avons eu une visite intéressante avec un guérisseuse traditionnelle, Abuelita, agee de 93 ans. Elle guérit Hope et a donné des ordres directs pour prendre des notes de nombreux remèdes guérir pour les maladies divers, au divertissement de tout le monde, notamment la fondatrice de Tandana, Anna. Le groupe a également donné des instructions strictes des herbes qu’ils devraient avoir ramené de la montagne ce jour-là, mais n’a pas!

 Le quatrième jour, nous sommes allés vers les collines proches de Otavalo nous avons pris les rejets des arbres alder pour Matias de utiliser pour propagation. Steve est devenu le grimpeur de l’échelle pour atteindre le meunier le plus élevé possible et augmenter le nombre de Matias. Le déjeuner était encore un repas fantastique chez Claudia ou nous avons dîné de la nourriture traditionnelle comme l’ajout de pop-corn à notre soupe a la place des biscuits salés comme nous le-ferions aux Etats Unis. Nous avons fini la journée avec un voyage à Cotacachi et les rues remplies de boutiques de cuir et un repas magnifique chez un restaurant local.

 Retour à la Quinde, Claire était noté comme 100% correct, Mike nous a fourni un aperçu de sa vidéo d l’importance de l’hydratation en altitude, et bénévole Shyamala a renommé Claire d’être toujours Clarita 

 Nous avons 3 jours de plus et nous sommes tous sûr que ce sera rien de mémorable et hilarant

 Nous avons beaucoup de choses bondées dans nos jours, et c’est excellent que j’aie pris des photos des tableaux blancs que Claire a écrit chaque jour pour détailler les activités de la journée suivante. (Ce qui est une pointe au cas où vous l’avez raté !)

 Mardi a commencé activement dans les collines près de Otavalo à Panecillo où nous avons pris des rejets des arbres Alder qu’Anna a planté en 1998 pendant un de ses premiers projets dans la région. Matias a démontré la technique et qualité propre qu’il a désiré et nous étions capable de couper 750 pièces qu’il a mis dans des pots au vivero. 

 Nous avons passé l’après-midi et le soir au village du Cotacachi et de la place des beaux magasins de cuir. Si vous aimez la maroquinerie de qualité (les sacs, les vestes, les chausseurs, etc…) être sûr d’apporter $100 de plus parce que c’est une qualité incroyable mais pas trop cher. Être sûr d’obtenir un peu de café d’emmener chez vous au magasin de Café Intag, juste à côté de la place du village et à visiter la boutique de cadeaux à gauche pour quelques cadeaux fait à la main par des femmes incroyables.

 gardening7Les aventures de mercredi nous a pris par bus à l’école de Guachinguero où quelques d’entre nous ont aidé dans le jardin de l’école et les autres ont travaillé avec trois garçons, qui ont 10-12 ans, à planter le quinoa sur une pente presque verticale près de l’école. En utilisant des binettes traditionnelles, 4 femmes américaines éparpillant des graines, n’étaient pas capables de suivre trois garçons en train de biner le côté de la colline !

Dans le jardin de l’école, des fleurs et des arbustes ont été déplacés, et une haie de lantana a été plantée autour de la limite. La taille des larves dans le sol étonné beaucoup d’entre nous y compris celui qui était plus grande que nos pouces.

Après le jardinage et la plantation ont été terminés, les étudiants ont été divisé en trois groupes par classe et mis dans une rotation de trois séances de jardinage différent. Un group a développé un program pour démontrer l’eau disponible du monde en utilisant une pomme, un group a démontré le départ de semences dans la coquille d’un orange mandarine, et le dernier group a démontré comment il est facile de composter. L’enseignante a été tellement impressionné par la leçon de compost qu’elle dit qu’elle va trouver un endroit pour composter à l’école.

Le déjeuner était un repas fantastique, composé d’une soupe quinoa fait par une mère de l’école. Sa main louche en bois sculpté fait peur à tous les enfants !

L’après-midi était un tour du site d’Otavalo pour la plantation des roses qui s’appelle La Ferme Falcon. La ferme a 67 hectares des roses tous sous plastique, irrigation plein goutte à goutte, et certifié par l’Alliance de Forêt Tropical pour le utilisation minimal des herbicides et pesticides. Chaque tige de la racine et variété rose grefféproduit des roses pour une moyenne de 17 ans. Chaque hectare peut de la plantation peut produire 2.5 milliard des roses chaque an ! Le directeur de la plantation était fantastique et a changé le nom du paquet de nourriture des roses à Rose Viagra pour toujours. Le directeur nous a gracieusement donné 8 bouquets des roses dont certaines pour bénévole Thea de son mari Steve pour leur 50ème anniversaire de mariage ! Les autres bouquets étaient séparés par les stagiaires et livrés à leurs mamans d’accueil et un des bouquets, composé de fleurs préférées du directeur, était donné à Maggie à son hôtel pour son hospitalité.

 Jeudi, Matias était content était content d’avoir nous retournons et remplir le parterre de fleurs dedans la serre avec  des graines en pots, pendant que d’autres entre nous ont continué à arracher les mauvaises herbesdes arbres en pot à l’extérieur. Nous avons lui présenté avec les nouvelles que le groupe avait rassemblé l’argent à acheter des fenêtres pour son nouveau bâtiment, et Debbie lui a donné un marteau, un scie à main, et un mètre ruban escamotable, qui la laissé sans voix ! Il était reconnaissant qu’il ne devra pas utiliser une pierre pour à marteler les choses !

 Nous sommes allés voir les compétences incroyables du Maître Tisserand Miguel. De moutons à tisser, nous avons pu voir le processus en entière. Apportez un peu d’argent supplémentaire pour cette visite aussi parce que ses pièces sont irrésistibles mais les prix varient entre $10-$500.Si vous restez dans la Hôtel de Maggie, elle a beaucoup de ses pièces exposées et à vendre.

 Nous avons terminé la soirée aven un repas incroyable à PuergoLago et et le don de nos T-shirts officiels de Tandanaavec quelques mots sincères incroyables du personnel. Nous sommes tous touchés par ce qu’ils ont dit à propos de chacun d’entre nouset ne pourrait jamais croire que tant de talent se trouve dans les stagiaires Tandana.

 Aujourd’hui c’est Vendredi,et nous sommes chargés d’un arrêt à l’équateur réel (pas la location touriste), un déjeuner pique-nique, une visite chez le producteur d’orchidées à Quito et puis dîner que nous commençons tous à se séparer.

 Ces types des vacances bénévoles ne sont pas pour tout le monde, mais chaque personne qui participe rentre à la maison avec plus que jamais imaginéet se développe d’une manière qu’ils ne devraient.

Inscrivez-vous! Vous n’allez jamais le regrettez.

Brenda Owen

 Brenda Owen, Michigan, Vacances Bénévoles de Jardinage

Octobre 2014

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s