A Holistic and Complete Experience

Ellza with new friends

Ellza with new friends

 

By Eliza Silverman

Tandana HCVV19 Volunteer

It was late one night at the hospital that I first stumbled across Tandana. I became a nurse because I wanted a skill set useful anywhere, and yet I had never been a nurse outside of the hospital setting. Now desperate for something meaningful to do with the vacation week I had been assigned, and determined to make the most of my time, I searched the Internet for a travel opportunity. I had an idea of what I wanted: a trip focused on healthcare, with an organized group, and most importantly, through a non-profit organization with strong values in regards to working with communities, fostering relationships, and respecting culture. I could not believe my luck when The Tandana Foundation popped into my search results. It was exactly what I had been looking for.

I was immediately surprised with what a large operation Tandana is. Their work goes beyond healthcare and into the realms of education and environment as well. In addition to hosting medical professionals twice a year, they are kept busy funding an educational scholarship program, hosting college and high school groups, and building and beautifying schools and community centers. They have American interns living in Otavalo for 6-9 months at a time teaching English in schools, helping with a patient follow up program at the subcentro (the local health clinic), and assisting with the volunteer vacations. They have group leaders from both the U.S. and Ecuador. Each day when we traveled to a remote site in Imbabura Province, our group consisted of: American volunteers, American expats living locally, Ecuadorian dentists, Ecuadorian university scholarship students, local translators (Kichwa to Spanish, Spanish to English), staff from the local subcentro, host family members, our wonderful bus driver, and sometimes other members of the community. I was so proud to show up every day with such a diverse group of people.

Eliza and the other nurse

Eliza and the other nurse

We unloaded the bus and immediately got to work. Another nurse and I were in charge of the lab for the week. We were set to perform simple blood and urine tests, ear flushes, give shots, and carry out the occasional rapid strep test.

As a nurse, I’m more than familiar with the ins and outs of the human body, but I’m also used to retracting lancets, specimen cups, and sending fluid samples off to some unknown place where results are generated and then magically inputted into the electronic medical record. It seems silly now, but I was slightly intimidated by the manual nature of the work. Eventually, however, I eased into these simple tasks with the help of the other nurse, and our daily problem became where we would find electricity to warm the water for our ear flushes.

How amazing it was to be out of the hospital! How incredible to perform a blood test and see it through from start to finish! How wonderful to get back to the basics of healthcare! How fun to work with limited resources and remember that healthcare is more than just high tech equipment! How important to remember why I wanted to be a nurse in the first place! How interesting to learn about the health issues and ailments that affect a specific population of people!

Eliza enjoying children singing

Eliza enjoying children singing

How special to connect to schoolchildren from another culture, hear their songs, and be witness to their curiosity (and also how kind and patient of them to help me practice my Spanish)!

I feel very privileged to have been a part of the Tandana Health Care Volunteer Vacation. There are many things that make this foundation a unique organization, but one reason is its emphasis on exchange.

the meal made during the cooking class

the meal made during the cooking class

In the evenings we had a cooking class, visited a shaman, went to a museum, hiked to a waterfall, and learned how to knit and make bracelets. I feel like I learned at least as much as I was able to contribute, and this makes the experience feel simultaneously holistic and complete.

On our last night, we were having our goodbye dinner in Otavalo before the teams heading to the airport. Musicians were playing, and the mood was celebratory. At a certain point I thought, “All right everyone, I know the music is catchy, but stomp a little less because the whole room is shaking!” It was then that one of our group leaders recognized the shaking as an earthquake. It went on for what felt like forever, although in retrospect, it was probably a minute or two. It wasn’t until we arrived at the airport that we were able to read about the earthquake’s magnitude and its growing death toll.

I can imagine that the earthquake has struck a nerve with all of us. Although Imbabura Province was largely unharmed, I came away from Ecuador feeling wholly connected to it. We cannot know the full extent of the suffering and damage that the earthquake has caused and is still causing, but I know all of our hearts are breaking for the country where we found so much kindness and beauty. I truly look forward to returning again.

 

Por Eliza Silverman

Tandana HCVV19 Vacaciones de Voluntario

Era tarde una noche, cuando por primera vez me crucé con Tandana. Me hice enfermera porque quise tener una habilidad que fuera útil en cualquier lugar, aunque nunca había ejercido la enfermería fuera del hospital. Estaba determinada a hacer algo significativo en la semana de vacaciones que tenía y estaba determinada a aprovechar el tiempo, busqué por internet por oportunidades de viaje. Tenía una idea de lo que estaba buscando, un viaje enfocado en el cuidado de la salud, con un grupo organizado, y más importante, a través de una organización sin fines de lucro con fuertes valores en cuanto  trabajo comunitario, establecer relaciones y respetar la cultura. No pude creer mi suerte cuando la Fundación Tandana, apareció entre mis resultados. Era exactamente lo que estaba buscando

Quedé inmediatamente sorprendida con la magnitud de la operación Tandana. Su trabajo va mas allá del cuidado de la salud y dentro de la realidad de la educación y el medio ambiente también. Además de albergar profesionales médicos dos veces al año, se mantienen ocupados solventando un programa de becas educacionales, albergando grupos de estudiantes de secundaria y universitarios construyendo y embelleciendo escuelas y centros comunitarios.  Hay internos estadounidenses, que viven en Otavalo de 6-9 meses enseñando Inglés en escuelas, ayudando a pacientes con programas de chequeo en el subcentro (la clínica local) y asistiendo con las vacaciones de voluntarios. Hay líderes de grupo de ambos países Estados Unidos y Ecuador. Cada día, cuando viajábamos a una remota localidad de la provincial de Imbabura, nuestro grupo consistía en voluntarios estadounidenses, repatriados estadounidenses que viven en la localidad, dentistas ecuatorianos, estudiantes universitarios ecuatorianos becados, traductores locales (kichwa a español, español a inglés), miembros de la clínica local, miembros de familias anfitrionas, nuestro maravilloso chofer de bus, y a veces otros miembros de la comunidad. Me sentía muy orgullosa de presentarme cada día con este grupo de gente tan diversa.

otro voluntario Tandaña trabaja en el laboratorio

la enfermera con lacual Eliza trabajaba en el laboratorio

Bajamos del autobús e inmediatamente nos pusimos a trabajar. Otra enfermera y yo estuvimos a cargo del laboratorio esa semana. Se nos brindó lo necesario para realizar simples exámenes de sangre y orina, lavados de oído, aplicar inyecciones, y ocasionalmente realizar una rápida prueba de estreptococo.

Como enfermera, estoy más que familiarizada con lo referente al cuerpo humano, pero también estoy acostumbrada al uso de lancetas retractiles, frascos de muestra, enviar muestras de fluidos a un lugar desconocido en el cual generan los resultados y mágicamente estos aparecen en la base de datos médica. Puede sonar extraño ahora, pero me encontraba un poco intimidada por todo el procedimiento manual de este proceso.

Eventualmente me sentí más tranquila con estos simples procedimientos gracias a la ayuda de otra enfermera, y nuestro problema diario fue el de conseguir electricidad par calendar el agua realizar los lavados de oído.

pacientes en espera de tratamiento

los pacientes en espera de tratamiento

Que maravilloso fue estar fuera del hospital. ¡Que increíble fue realizar pruebas de sangre y observar el proceso desde el comienzo hasta el final! Fue maravilloso regresar a lo básico del cuidado de la salud. Fue divertido trabajar con recursos limitados y recordar que el cuidado de la salud es más que el uso de equipos de alta tecnología. ¡Cuán importante recordar porque quise ser enfermera en primer lugar!  Fue muy interesante aprender sobre problemas de salud y enfermedades que afectan a un especifico grupo de pobladores. ¡Qué especial conectarme con niños en edad escolar que tiene otra cultura, escuchar sus canciones y ser testigo de sus curiosidades (además de su amabilidad y paciencia para ayudarme a practicar mi español)!

Me siento muy privilegiada de haber sido parte de las Vacaciones de Voluntarios del cuidado de la salud de Tandana. Hay muchas cosas que hacen a esta fundación una organización única, sin embargo, una razón es su énfasis en intercambio.

tejido de punto

haciendo pulseras

  Por las tardes teníamos una clase de cocina, visitábamos a un chamán, fuimos al museo, hicimos caminatas hacia una caída de agua y aprendimos a tejer y hacer brazaletes. Siento como que aprendí al mismo ritmo que contribuí, y esto hace que la experiencia se sienta simultáneamente incorporadora y completa.

En nuestra última noche, tuvimos una cena de despedida en Otavalo antes de dirigirnos al aeropuerto. Los músicos tocaban y el ambiente era de celebración. ¡En cierto momento pensé “bien, sé que la música es contagiosa, pero dejen de zapatear que todo el cuarto está temblando”!  fue en ese momento en el que uno de los integrantes de nuestro grupo reconoció el movimiento como un terremoto. Duró mucho y continuaba por lo que parecía una eternidad, pero en retrospectiva duró un minuto o dos. No fue hasta que arribamos al aeropuerto que pudimos leer sobre la magnitud del terremoto y la cantidad creciente de muertes.

Me puedo imaginar que el terremoto a afectado un nervio en todos nosotros. A pesar de que la provincia de Imbabura no fue muy afectada, me retiré de Ecuador sintiéndome bastante conectada a ello. No podemos saber la total extensión del sufrimiento y daño que causó el terremoto y que continua causando, pero sí sé que nuestros corazones esta rotos por el país en el cual encontramos tanta amabilidad y belleza. En verdad estoy ansiosa de regresar otra vez.

 

 

Par Eliza Silverman

Bénévole Tandana HCVV19

J’ai découvert l’existence de la fondation Tandana au beau milieu de la nuit, à l’hôpital. Si je suis devenue infirmière, c’est parce que je voulais pouvoir mettre à profit mes compétences dans n’importe quel environnement, et pourtant, je n’avais jusqu’alors jamais exercé hors de l’hôpital. Comme j’étais bien décidée à occuper de façon utile la semaine de congé qui m’avait été accordée et que je comptais bien en profiter au mieux, je me suis mise à chercher sur internet une occasion de voyager. J’avais une idée assez précise de ce que je voulais : un séjour axé sur les soins de santé aux côtés d’une organisation à but non lucratif qui soit profondément engagée auprès des communautés tout en respectant les cultures et en établissant des liens entre elles. Ce fut une véritable aubaine pour moi de tomber sur la fondation Tandana au cours de ma recherche, car la fondation correspondait exactement ce que je cherchais.

nuevos amigos

des nouvelles amies

L’organisation me frappa d’emblée par son envergure. Leurs activités vont bien au-delà des soins de santé et concernent tout aussi bien l’éducation ou l’environnement. En plus d’accueillir du personnel médical deux fois par an, les membres de la fondation s’emploient à financer un programme de scolarisation, ils accueillent des groupes de lycéens et d’étudiants et construisent ou rénovent des écoles et des centres communautaires. La fondation envoie des stagiaires américains à Otavalo pour des périodes de 6 à 9 mois pour y enseigner l’anglais, participer au programme de suivi des patients du subcentro (la clinique locale) et s’occuper de l’accueil des bénévoles. Le personnel encadrant est constitué de personnes venant aussi bien des États-Unis, que d’Équateur. Chaque jour, lors de nos interventions dans une zone reculée de la province d’Imbabura, notre groupe était composé de bénévoles et d’expatriés américains vivant sur place, de dentistes et d’étudiants équatoriens, d’interprètes locaux (pour la traduction du kichwa à l’espagnol et de l’espagnol à l’anglais), de membres du personnel du subcentro, de membres des familles d’accueil, de notre formidable chauffeur de bus, et parfois d’autres membres de la communauté. J’avais beaucoup de fierté à rejoindre chaque jour un groupe aussi diversifié.

Nous nous mettions au travail dès la descente du bus. J’étais chargée pour la semaine de m’occuper du laboratoire d’analyses avec une autre infirmière. Nous devions effectuer de simples analyses de sang et d’urine, des nettoyages du conduit auditif, des injections et des tests de diagnostic rapide, de temps en temps.

Je connais bien, en tant qu’infirmière, les aléas du corps humain, et je suis aussi habituée à récupérer des lancettes ou des coupelles de prélèvement et à envoyer les échantillons je ne sais trop où afin qu’ils soient traduits en résultats qui viennent comme par magie renseigner le dossier médical par voie électronique. Cela paraît maintenant idiot, mais j’étais alors un peu intimidée par la procédure manuelle en vigueur. Je me suis pourtant adaptée peu à peu à ces actes simples grâce à l’aide de l’autre infirmière, jusqu’à ce que notre problème quotidien se résume à trouver une source d’électricité pour réchauffer l’eau nécessaire aux lavements d’oreilles.

ES_pic9

les patients

C’était vraiment merveilleux de se retrouver hors des murs de l’hôpital ! C’était extraordinaire d’effectuer une analyse de sang du début à la fin et formidable de revenir aux fondamentaux des soins de santé ! C’était si plaisant de travailler avec des moyens limités et de reprendre conscience que les soins médicaux ne se réduisent pas à des équipements high tech ! Il était vraiment crucial de me rappeler pourquoi j’avais voulu devenir infirmière ! Comme ça a été passionnant de découvrir les problèmes de santé qui affectent les membres d’une population donnée et d’entrer en relation avec des écoliers appartenant à une autre culture, de découvrir leurs chants et d’être témoin de leur curiosité (mais aussi de la patience et de la gentillesse dont ils ont su faire preuve en ce qui concerne ma connaissance de l’espagnol) !

Ce fut pour moi un privilège d’avoir participé à ce séjour bénévole auprès de la fondation Tandana. Cette organisation est unique à bien des égards, mais elle se distingue notamment par la priorité qu’elle accorde à l’échange. En soirée, nous avons assisté à un cours de cuisine, nous avons rendu visite à un shaman, nous avons visité un musée, nous sommes allés voir des chutes d’eau et nous avons appris à tricoter et à confectionner des bracelets. J’ai le sentiment d’avoir au moins autant appris que contribué, ce qui fait de cette aventure une expérience à la fois globale et complète.

Le dernier soir s’est tenu un dîner d’adieu à Otavalo, avant notre retour à l’aéroport. Il y avait des musiciens, et l’ambiance était festive. À un moment, je me suis dit : « Ok, tout le monde, je suis d’accord, la musique est entraînante, mais tapez du pied un peu moins fort, parce que vous faites trembler toute la pièce !». C’est alors qu’un de nos accompagnateurs s’est rendu compte qu’il s’agissait en fait d’un tremblement de terre. J’ai eu l’impression que cela a duré une éternité, bien qu’en fait cela n’ait duré qu’une ou deux minutes. Ce n’est qu’une fois à l’aéroport que nous avons appris quelle avait été la magnitude de ce tremblement de terre et combien de victimes il avait déjà fait.

de beaux paysages

de beaux paysages

Cet événement nous a sans aucun doute tous profondément marqués. Même si la province d’Imbabura a été plutôt épargnée, je suis rentrée d’Équateur avec un fort sentiment d’attache. In ne nous est pas possible de connaître l’ampleur de la souffrance et des dégâts causés par ce tremblement de terre, mais je sais que nous avons tous de la peine pour ce pays où nous avons trouvé tant de bonté et de beauté. J’ai vraiment hâte d’y retourner.

Inspiring Stories from Tandana’s Literacy Program

Kadidia's class

Kadidia’s class

 

Kadidia Yanogué, une auditrice du centre de Danaguiri dans la commune de Ségé-Iré dit:

Kadidia broderie

Kadidia broderie

“Je suis une femme mariée et mère des enfants, je  mène la tricotterie pour les rideaux des portes, fenêtres et les tissus pour porter les bébés au dos. C’est toujours les élèves du village qui m’aidait à tracer mes motifs et les dessins que les clients veulent. J’ai commencée les cours alpha en Tommosso dans le mois de janvier 2016 et depuis le mois de Mars 2016 je n’ai plus besoin des élèves pour tracer les motifs, les lignes ou dessins a tricoter dans mes tissus.Grace à la Fondation Tandana et au programme alpha, mon travail de tricotage s’est renforce et je peux même écrire le nom des clients qui souhaitent dans mon tricotage. Pour preuve voici un tissu tricoté qui porte un mot de remerciement et de reconnaissance à la Fondation TANDANA et  l’Association alpha en Tommosso que je compte remettre a la coordinatrice. Par ailleurs grâce a cette formation j’économise 150F à 200 CFA par tracé d’un tissus à tricoter que je donnais aux élève.”

Kadidia Yanogué au milieu des femmes et le formateur Sekou Tembiné à droite

Kadidia Yanogué au milieu des femmes et le formateur Sekou Tembiné à droite

Un commentaire de Moussa Tembiné:

D’autre part, ce centre au départ les hommes n’avaient pas la volonte de faire le hangar, et les auditrices prenaient les cours sous le soleil dans la cours du chef du village durant tous le mois de janvier 2016. Malgré le soleil, les 30 auditrices venaient toujours al’heure, confirme le formateur villageois  Sékou Tembiné. Grâce au courage et de l’engagement régulier des femmes auditrices, les hommes du village étaient obligés de faire le hangar. Et depuis 15 février 2016 les auditrices sont formées dans un hangar.

Mariam

Mariam

Mariam Yada Tembiné est une auditrice du centre de Tégou dans la commune d’Ondogou. Elle vient du village d’Ondon Da ou sa maman est tombée malade d’une fracture à la main. Informee de la situation, l’auditrice Mariam Yada Tembiné de Tégou est venue à Odon Da pour entretenir sa maman malade comme exige les coutumes au pays Dogon. Etant à  Odon-Da, un jour elle a pris les livrets et le sac de sa maman qui est aussi une auditrice du village pour suivre les cours dans le centre d’Odon-Da afin de se mettre à jour. Elle dit, “commec’est le même programme de formation pourquoi je ne vais pas profiter en restant toujours auprès de maman qui est malade.”  Son geste du courage et de bonne initiative a beaucoup marqué les auditrices du centre de sa maman (Ondon –Da). Par ce geste on voit combien de fois certaines auditrices tiennent leur engagement pour la formation alpha.

 

Kadidia Yanogué, a literacy student in Danaguiri, in the Sege-Ire township said:

Kadidia with cloth for Tandana

Kadidia with cloth for Tandana

“I am a married woman and the mother of children. I do embroidery for curtains and cloths to carry babies.  It was always students in my village who helped me to draw the designs and motifs that my clients wanted.  I started the Tommo So literacy classes in January 2016, and since March 2016, I no longer need the students’ help to draw the designs, lines, and motifs to embroider in my cloth.  Thanks to the Tandana Foundation and the literacy program, my work in embroidery is strengthened, and I can even write the names of my clients in my cloths. As proof, here is a cloth that I embroidered with words of appreciation and thanks for The Tandana Foundation and the Tommo So literacy association. I plan to give it to the Director of Tandana.  Also, thanks to my literacy training, I save 150-200 francs per design, which I used to pay the student who helped me.”

An update from Moussa Tembine

Kadidia (right) with a fellow student

Kadidia (right) with a fellow student

Also, in Kadidia’s village, at the beginning, the men didn’t want to build the hangar they were supposed to build for the women to hold classes in.  The students had class in the sun in the village chief’s courtyard for the entire month of January.  Despite the sun, the 30 students always arrived on time for class, confirmed the instructor Sekou Tembine.  Thanks to the courage and dedication of the women students, the men of the village had to follow through and build the hangar.  Since February 15, the students have been holding classes in the hangar.

Mariam

Mariam

Mariam Yada Tembiné was a student of the literacy class in Tégou in the Ondogou township.  She is originally from the village of Ondon Da. Her mother, who lives in Ondon Da, fractured her hand. When she found out about her mother’s injury, Mariam Yada Tembiné went to Odon Da to take care of her injured mother, as custom in Dogon Country requires.  While she was in Odon Da, one day she took the literacy booklets from her mother’s bag—her mother had also been a literacy student in Ondon Da—and started to catch up on the lessons she had missed.  She said, “since it’s the same training program, why don’t I take advantage of the classes here in Ondon Da while I’m taking care of my injured mother here.”  Her action of courage and initiative made a big impression on the other students of Ondon Da.  By her actions, we can see how far some students go in their dedication to literacy classes.

 

Kadidia Yanogué, una estudiante cursando el programa de alfabetización en  Danaguiri, en el municipio de Segue-Ire, manifestó:

bordado Kadidia

bordado Kadidia

“Soy una mujer casada y madre. Hago bordados para cortinas y fulares portabebés. Eran las estudiantes de mi aldea las que siempre me ayudaban a dibujar los diseños y adornos que mis clientes querían. Yo empecé las clases de alfabetización en la lengua Tommo So en enero del 2016, y desde marzo del mismo año, ya no he necesitado la ayuda de las estudiantes para dibujar los diseños, líneas y adornos para bordar mis fulares portabebés.  Gracias a la Fundación Tandana y al programa de alfabetización, mis labores de bordado se han reforzado; ya puedo incluso escribir los nombres de mis clientes en mis fulares portabebés. Como prueba de ello, aquí les muestro algo que yo bordé con palabras de agradecimiento para la Fundación Tandana y la asociación de alfabetización de la lengua Tommo so. Tengo en mente dárselo a la directora de Tandana. También, gracias a mi formación de alfabetización, ahorro de 150 a 200 francos por diseño,  los cuales utilicé para pagar a la estudiante que me ayudó.”

Últimas noticias de Moussa Tembine

También en aquella aldea, al principio, los hombres no querían construir el recinto que tenían que construir para que las mujeres recibieran sus clases. Las estudiantes recibieron sus clases bajo el sol en el patio del jefe de la aldea durante todo el mes de enero. A pesar del sol, las 30 estudiantes siempre llegaban a clase a su hora, confirmó el profesor Sekou Tembine.  Gracias al coraje y la dedicación de las estudiantes, los hombres de la aldea tuvieron que cumplir y construir el recinto. Desde febrero del 2015, las estudiantes han estado recibiendo sus clases en este recinto.

Mariam

Mariam

Mariam Yada Tembiné era una estudiante de la clase de alfabetización en Tégou en el municipio de Ondogo. Ella es original de la aldea de Ondon Da. Su madre, que vive en Ondon Da, se fracturó la mano. Cuando ella se enteró de la lesión de su madre, Mariam Yada Tembiné  fue a Odon Da para cuidarla, como es costumbre en el país Dogon. Mientras estaba allí, un día cogió los cuadernos de alfabetización del bolso de su madre—su madre también había sido una estudiante de alfabetización en Ondon Da—y empezó a ponerse al día con las lecciones que se había perdido.  Ella declaró: “puesto que es el mismo programa de formación, ¿por qué no aprovecharlo aquí en Ondon Da mientras cuido de mi madre?” Su gesto de valentía e iniciativa causó una fuerte impresión en las otras estudiantes de Ondon Da. A través de sus acciones, podemos ver hasta qué punto llega la dedicación de algunas estudiantes por las clases de alfabetización.

A Volunteer Helps Himself on a Volunteer Vacation

Matthew

Matthew

By Matthew Rothert

Tandana Volunteer, September 2008 and 2009

My Dad always says that the best way to help yourself is to help someone else. Well, several years ago, I decided to take this to heart and see if it could apply to my situation. I was going through a challenging time in my life and had been feeling sorry for myself.

I reached out to my Aunt Hope for some wisdom. She said that my cousin Anna had a trip coming up to Ecuador with the foundation she started, and I should go with her. It was a health care volunteer vacation and I have no medical background, so I wasn’t sure how exactly I would be able to help. I also didn’t speak Spanish very well, so in my mind that further limited me in what I would be able to offer in terms of support.

beautiful scenery

beautiful scenery

After a flight to Quito and a scenic ride through the countryside and mountains, I arrived in a little community and met the other volunteers. I was encouraged to find them all to be very nice and from a wide variety of backgrounds. There were others without any medical training, and they assured me I would find ways to contribute. They were right. Each day, I helped load up the truck as we made our way to a different community. After unloading our supplies, there was plenty for me to do.

Matthew taking vitals

Matthew taking vitals

I checked vitals on patients, comforted them as best I could, played with the kids, and handed out the prescribed medicine. We found ways to communicate despite the language barrier. I learned that a smile crosses all language and cultural barriers. So does a kind heart, and that’s what so many of the volunteers and indigenous people shared. Everyone was so nice and loving. The people that we helped were so grateful to have us there doing what we were doing. It really seemed like we were making a big difference in the quality of their lives.

Matthew2

The home where Matthew was invited to eat dinner

I was so amazed at how hard the locals worked to just survive. Yet they all seemed so happy and content. They truly valued their families, their friendships, their land and community. On our final day, one of the families in a nearby community opened up their home to us and made us dinner. Their home consisted of two rooms with cinder block walls and dirt floors for the 10 family members to live in. They offered us the best of their bounty, even killing one of their chickens. They gave us cinder blocks to sit on, inside their home and proudly served us. They were so thankful and generous to us that it had a powerful impact on my life.

I came home grateful for my life and all that I had. I will never forget their contented nature and their happy/care free attitude. They taught me what is really important in life, relationships, not material things. I have made the trip twice and still keep in contact with some of the other volunteers. I hope to go back again soon with my wife and friends from my community here.

some of the children that Matthew taught how to skateboard

some of the children that Matthew taught how to skateboard

I love sharing my favorite memories with friends, like making pizza with an Ecuadorian family (their first time), walking through fields with cows and pigs roaming around, and skateboarding with the kids on a makeshift board. All of the amazing handmade items at the market in Otavalo, the Alpaca roaming around the property where we stayed, visiting with a Shaman and learning about natural healing remedies, the scenic beauty of the Andes mountains and so much more.

On a trip like this, you always go thinking that you will help someone else, but ultimately you help yourself. I gained so much more from the experience than I gave and I have memories that I will never forget. Thank you Tandana for making this possible.

 

Por Matthew Rothert

Voluntario de Tandana, septiembre del 2008 y septiembre del 2009

Mi padre siempre dice que la mejor manera de ayudarte a ti mismo es ayudar a alguien. Bueno, hace varios años, decidí cumplirlo y ver si era capaz de aplicarlo a mi situación personal. Yo estaba pasando por un tiempo difícil en mi vida y en el que sentía pena de mi mismo.  

Me dirigí a mi sabia tía Hope para que me aconsejara. Me comentó que mi prima Anna tenía previsto un viaje a Ecuador con la fundación que ella creó, y que debería ir con ella. Eran unas vacaciones de voluntariado de asistencia sanitaria y como no tengo ninguna formación médica, no estaba seguro exactamente de cómo podría ser de ayuda. Tampoco hablaba muy bien español, así que tenía mis dudas sobre el limitado tipo de ayuda que podría ofrecer.

Mateo (fila trasera izquierda) con l'autre volontaires

Mateo (fila trasera izquierda) con los otros voluntarios

Tras un vuelo a Quito y un recorrido panorámico a través del campo y las montañas, llegué a una pequeña comunidad y conocí a los otros voluntarios. Ya me habían advertido que todos serían muy simpáticos y de diferentes orígenes. Había otros sin formación médica, y me aseguraron que encontraría formas de colaborar. Tenían razón. Cada día, ayudaba a cargar el camión cuando íbamos a otra comunidad. Tras cargar nuestros productos, tenía mucho que hacer.

revisan los signos vitales

revisando los signos vitales

Comprobaba las constantes vitales de los pacientes, los consolaba lo mejor que podía, jugaba con los niños y también les daba las medicinas recetadas. Encontramos formas de comunicarnos a pesar de la barrera del idioma. Me di cuenta de que una sonrisa rompe todas las barreras culturales y lingüísticas, al igual que un buen corazón. Esto es lo que compartían mucho de los voluntarios  y la población indígena. Todo el mundo era muy amable y cariñoso. La gente a la que ayudábamos estaba muy agradecida por lo que hacíamos. Realmente parecía que estábamos creando una gran diferencia en la calidad de sus vidas.

Mateo y amigos locales disfrutan de una comida

Mateo y amigos locales disfrutan de una comida

Me sorprendió enormemente cuánto trabajaba la gente local para simplemente sobrevivir. Sin embargo, a todos se les veía felices y satisfechos. Valoran mucho la familia, las amistades, su tierra y su comunidad. En nuestro último día, una de las familias de una comunidad cercana nos abrió su casa y nos preparó la cena. Su casa consistía en dos habitaciones con paredes de hormigón y suelos de tierra para vivir los 10 miembros de la familia. Nos ofrecieron lo mejor de su cosecha, incluso mataron uno de sus pollos. Nos dieron bloques de hormigón para sentarnos dentro de la casa, y con mucho orgullo nos sirvieron. Fueron tan generosos y agradecidos que ello ha causado un gran impacto en mi vida.

Volví a casa agradecido por mi vida y todo lo que tenía. Nunca olvidare su actitud positiva y despreocupada. Me enseñaron lo que es realmente importante en la vida: las relaciones humanas y no las cosas materiales. He realizado este viaje dos veces y todavía mantengo contacto con algunos de los voluntarios. Espero volver a ir pronto con mi esposa y amigos de mi comunidad de aquí.

demostrando el skate

demostrando el skate

 Me encanta compartir mis recuerdos con amigos, como cuando hice una pizza con una familia ecuatoriana (su primera vez), cuando caminamos a través de los campos con vacas y cerdos rondando por allí, cuando montaba en monopatín con los niños sobre una tabla improvisada. Todos los fascinantes  artículos confeccionados a mano en el mercado de Otavalo, la alpaca rondando por la vivienda donde nos alojábamos, la visita con un hechicero y el aprendizaje de remedios curativos naturales, la belleza panorámica de las montañas de los Andes y mucho más.

En un viaje de este tipo, uno siempre piensa que ayudará a alguien, pero al final uno se ayuda a sí mismo. He obtenido mucho más de esta experiencia de lo que yo he dado; tengo recuerdos que jamás olvidaré. Gracias Tandana por hacer esto posible.

 

Par  Matthew Rothert

Volontaire de Tandana, septembre 2008 et septembre 2009

Mon père dit toujours que la meilleure façon de s’aider soi-même est d’aider quelqu’un d’autre. Eh bien, il y a plusieurs années, j’ai décidé de le prendre au sérieux et de voir si cela pouvait s’appliquer à ma situation. Je traversais une période très difficile et je m’apitoyais sur mon sort.

Matthew et Anna

Matthew et Anna

Je fis appel à ma Tante Hope pour avoir quelques conseils. Elle me dit que ma cousine Anna allait voyager sous peu pour l’Equateur avec la fondation qu’elle avait créée, et que je devrais partir avec elle. C’était du volontariat dans le secteur des soins de santé et je n’avais pas de formation médicale, donc je ne voyais pas vraiment comment je pourrais aider. En plus, je ne parlais pas très bien espagnol, donc à mes yeux cela me limitait encore plus dans ce que j’aurais été capable d’apporter en terme de support.

Après un vol pour Quito et une balade pittoresque à travers la campagne et les montagnes, je suis arrivé dans une petite communauté et j’ai rencontré d’autres bénévoles. J’ai été satisfait de voir qu’ils étaient tous très gentils et issus de milieux très divers. Il y en avait d’autres sans aucune formation médicale, et ils m’assurèrent que je trouverais des moyens d’aider. Ils avaient raison. Chaque jour, j’aidais à charger le camion pendant que nous nous dirigions vers une autre communauté.

Matthew aide à transporter un patient

Matthew aide à transporter un patient

Après le déchargement de notre matériel, il me restait encore plein de choses à faire. Je prenais la tension des patients, les réconfortais du mieux que je pouvais, jouais avec les enfants, et distribuais les médicaments prescrits. On trouva des manières de communiquer malgré la barrière de la langue. J’ai appris qu’un sourire traverse toutes les barrières linguistiques et culturelles.  Et il en va de même pour un bon cœur, et c’est ce qu’un grand nombre de bénévoles et d’indigènes avaient en commun. Tout le monde était tellement sympathique et chaleureux. Les personnes que nous avions aidées étaient tellement reconnaissantes de nous avoir parmi eux, à faire ce que nous faisions. On avait vraiment l’impression d’apporter une contribution importante dans la qualité de leur vie.

Membres de la communauté Matthew Avec

Amis du village avec Matthew

J’ai été tellemselect surpris de voir combien les locaux doivent travailler dur rien que pour survivre. Pourtant, ils avaient tous l’air d’être tellement  heureux et satisfaits. Ils attachaient beaucoup de valeur à leurs familles, leurs amis, leur terre et la communauté. Au terme de notre dernière journée, une des familles d’une communauté voisine nous ouvrit sa maison et nous fit à diner. Leur maison consistait en 2 pièces avec des murs en parpaing et des sols sales pour y loger les 10 membres de la famille. Ils nous offrirent le meilleur de leur bien, tuant même un de leurs poulets. Ils nous donnèrent des blocs de parpaings pour nous asseoir dessus, dans leur maison, et nous servirent avec fierté. Ils furent tellement reconnaissants et généreux envers nous que cela a eu un puissant impact dans ma vie. 

Je suis rentré chez moi en étant reconnaissant pour ma vie et pour tout ce que j’avais. Je n’oublierais jamais leur nature souriante et leur attitude joyeuse / insouciante. Ils m’ont appris ce qui comptait vraiment dans la vie: des relations humaines, pas des biens matériels. J’ai fait deux fois le voyage et je suis toujours en contact avec certains des autres bénévoles. J’espère y retourner encore bientôt avec ma femme et des amis de ma communauté d’ici.

faire des pizzas

faire des pizzas

J’aime partager mes meilleurs souvenirs avec des amis, comme faire une pizza avec une famille équatorienne (pour leur première fois), marcher à travers des champs avec des vaches et des cochons errants autour, et faire du skateboard avec les enfants sur des planches improvisées/ de fortune .Tous les remarquable objets faits mains au marché à Otavalo, l’Alpaga qui se promène autour de la propriété où nous avions séjourné, la visite au Shaman et l’apprentissage sur les remèdes naturels, la beauté du paysage de la cordillère des Andes et bien plus encore. 

Dans un voyage comme celui-là, vous partez toujours en pensant que vous allez aider quelqu’un d’autre, mais au final vous vous aidez vous-même. J’ai reçu bien plus de cette expérience que ce que j’ai donné et j’ai en mémoire des souvenirs que je n’oublierais jamais. Merci Tandana pour avoir rendu tout cela possible.

Tandana Is True to Its Mission on a Health Care Volunteer Vacation in Ecuador

Kiera working in the lab during the Health Care Volunteer Vacation

Kiera working in the lab during the Health Care Volunteer Vacation

By Kiera  Homann

I have wanted to travel internationally as a nurse since nursing school, but had a hard time finding something that fit, either due to cost or the mission statement of the organization. I met people this winter who introduced me to Tandana. I looked at the website and immediately felt that it fit all my requirements. The Tandana approach, as described on the website, made me immediately excited. The cost was reasonable, especially considering that room and board were included. I was very happy with all the food and the accommodations at the hotel. Finally, I really liked hearing that Tandana follows up with patients. This was very important to me. I didn’t want to show up in a community and then leave with no continued care. Since being in Ecuador, I am so impressed with Anna’s and Tandana’s involvement in the communities.  I was truly honored to see what Anna and Tandana have done and continue to do in Ecuador.

Upon returning home from my trip with Tandana, I have been asked the question what was my experience like, and was it what I had expected? The best response I have is that Tandana lived up to their Mission and Value statement on their website. I was excited when I found Tandana and was telling myself that if they lived up to just a little of what they have on their website, then I would be happy. But I have to say that they fully honored their mission and value statement on the Health Care Volunteer Vacation I was part of in Ecuador. I am grateful for my experience with them and thankful for their existence.

 

Kiera (derecha) trabaja en el laboratorio durante las vacaciones de Voluntarios de Salud

Kiera (derecha) trabaja en el laboratorio durante las vacaciones de Cuidado de la Salud Voluntarios

Por Kiera  Homann

Había querido viajar internacionalmente, como enfermera, desde que estaba en la escuela de enfermería, pero tuve dificultades, encontrando algo afín, ya sea debido al costo o la misión de la organización. Este invierno, conocí a gente que me habló sobre Tandana. Chequeé la página de internet e inmediatamente sentí que cumplía con todos mis requerimientos. El enfoque de Tandana, según como está descrito en su página, me llenó de emoción. El costo era razonable, especialmente considerando que viaje y estadía estaban incluidos. Me sentí muy contenta con la comida y el  hotel.  Finalmente, me encanta escuchar que Tandana hace seguimiento a los pacientes. Esto es muy importante para mí. No quería presentarme a una comunidad para luego marcharme sin ningún tipo de seguimiento médico.  Desde que estoy aquí en Ecuador, estoy muy interesada en el compromiso de Anna y Tandana con las comunidades. Verdaderamente ha sido un honor, ver lo que Anna y Tandana han hecho y continúan haciendo en Ecuador.

Luego de mi regreso a casa, luego de mi viaje con Tandana, me preguntaron cuál fue mi experiencia y si fue lo que esperaba? La mejor respuesta que tengo es que Tandana se rige por su misión y su visión en cuanto al cuidado de la salud, conforme a lo expresado en su página de internet. Me sentí muy contenta cuando encontré sobre Tandana, y me decía a mí misma que si se rigieran un poco a lo que expresan en su página, me sentiré muy feliz. Sin embargo, tengo que decir que completamente llenaron mis expectativas y cumplen su misión y visión en cuanto a las vacaciones de voluntarios del cuidado de la salud, fui parte de ello en Ecuador. Estoy completamente agradecida por mi experiencia con ellos y agradecida por su asistencia.

Kiera (à droite) travaillant dans le laboratoire pendant les vacances Healthcare Volunteer

Kiera (à droite) travaillant dans le laboratoire pendant les vacances de soins de santé bénévoles

Par Kiera  Homann

Cela faisait depuis l’école de médecine que je souhaitais voyager en tant qu’infirmière mais c’était difficile de trouver quelque chose qui convienne, soit pour une raison financière, soit en raison de la mission proposée par l’organisation. L’hiver dernier j’ai rencontré des personnes qui m’ont mise en relation avec la Fondation Tandana. J’ai consultéson site internet et immédiatement j’ai senti que cette organisation répondaità toutes mes exigences. J’ai été trèsemballée par son approche décrite sur le site. Le prix était raisonnable, sachant que le gite et le couvert étaient inclus. J’ai d’ailleurs ététrès satisfaite du service de restauration et d’hébergement de l’hôtel. Mais ce que j’ai apprécié le plus, c’est le fait que la Fondation Tandana suive ses patients. C’était très important pour moi. Je ne voulais pas arriver dans une communauté pour ensuite repartir sans qu’il n’y ait de suivis. Depuis que je suis ici en Equateur, je suis impressionnée par l’engagement de Anna et de la Fondation dans les communautés. J’ai été honorée de voir ce qu’ils ont fait et continuent de faire dans ce pays.

De retour de mon voyage, on m’a demandé comment s’étaitpassé mon expérience et comment je l’avais imaginée ? La meilleure réponse que je puisse donner c’est que la Fondation Tandana se montre à la hauteur de sa mission et de ses valeurs.J’étaistrèsenthousiaste lorsque j’ai découvert la Fondation et je me disais que si cette dernière respectait un tant soit peu ce qui étaitdécrit sur le site internet, je serais heureuse. Mais je dois dire qu’elle honore entièrement sa mission et ses valeurs concernant le programme de bénévolat de soins de santé auquel j’ai participé. Je suis très reconnaissante de cette expérienceet très heureuse que cette organisation existe.

Kiera (right) working in the lab during the Health Care Volunteer Vacation

Kiera (right) working in the lab during the Health Care Volunteer Vacation

Tandana Publishes Illustrated Otavaleño Story, Juanita the Colorful Butterfly

By Susan Koller

When Segundo Moreta Morales’s daughter, Kamari, was young, she always wanted to hear stories like Little Red Riding Hood before going to bed. Segundo, who has always been passionate about promoting his culture started thinking, “why aren’t there stories for children that represent the Otavaleño culture?” This inspired him to write stories from his culture that portrayed the Andean worldview and promoted positive values such as protecting the natural world. Along with keeping the culture and worldview alive for individuals in Ecuador, Segundo also believed that they should be shared with others around the world.

illustration from the book

illustration from the book

With the help of The Tandana Foundation, Segundo has just published one of these stories, Juanita the Colorful Butterfly, and achieved his goal. This charming illustrated children’s book tells about a butterfly who loses her color when a witch casts a spell on her. However, all of Juanita’s nature-dwelling friends help her to become colorful again. The story is set during February and March, which is when the Festival of Flowering is held in the region of Otavalo. Along with publishing the book, Tandana also helped Segundo to contract with two indigenous artists, Inti Gualapuro and Luis Uksha, to draw the illustrations. Having indigenous illustrators meant the illustrations also represent the Andean culture and worldview: Juanita is portrayed as a young indigenous girl.

The book is written in three different languages, English, Spanish, and Kichwa (the language of the majority of indigenous people in Ecuador). This way, readers from different cultures can enjoy the delightful story. However, Segundo hopes his readers are more than just entertained. He wants them to imagine going to Otavalo and experiencing the beauty of the land.

Segundo fulfilled his lifelong dream of becoming a writer by publishing this book. When asked about how he feels about his book being published, he said,

 Segundo Moreta Morales

Segundo Moreta Morales

“The feeling I have is indescribable, I have so much excitement, joy, I want to cry, and a mix of feelings. It’s gratifying to have a book that I have written myself. The joy is great to be able to share with the world a small part of my culture of Otavalo, the land where I was born. To say how I feel is indescribable.”

Segundo has more plans for Juanita the Colorful Butterfly. He wants to expand the story and design children’s games, write songs, and have coloring books based on the story. In the future, Segundo would like to publish more books with Tandana’s help. Right now he wants everyone to enjoy the story.

Tandana got involved in this project because the book promotes the foundation’s mission of “empowering individuals of various cultural backgrounds with an increased awareness of the world, other cultures, and themselves, and with an expanded sense of their possibilities,” as well as the longstanding positive relationship between Segundo and the foundation.

The partnership between Tandana and Segundo is a natural one. Segundo, who currently teaches PE and Kichwa at Alejandro Chavez School in Gualsaqui, is a longtime Tandana friend and supporter. He first met Tandana’s Founding Director Anna Taft, when they were both teaching at the Ati Pillahuasu school in Panecillo in 1998.  Through the years, Segundo has hosted many Tandana volunteers at his home, given talks to volunteer groups about his indigenous culture and bilingual education, and helped Tandana with various projects.

working on the mural

working on the mural

Juanita, the Colorful Butterfly has already inspired more Tandana projects. In March 2016, a group of volunteers from George Washington University helped paint a mural of the book on the outside wall of the school in the community of Quichinche. School administrators and art teachers were looking for a way to liven up the school’s preschool block, while promoting reading. They were thinking of painting a mural of a fairytale when Anna suggested that they use a story from their local area. They liked the idea and chose to do a mural of Juanita. The mural took about a week to paint and consists of seven panels. Each panel represents a different illustration from the book. The George Washington University volunteers worked alongside 10th-graders from the school, the school’s art teacher, and a local artist to paint the mural. After the mural was finished, the GWU students took turns reading the book for the Quichinche students.

parade fun

Segundo’s daughter portrays Juanita in the Tandana float for the Quichinche parade

 

Juanita was also the inspiration for Tandana’s float in the March 2016 Saint’s Day parade in Quichinche. The parade opens the weekend-long festivities that celebrate St. Joseph, Quichinche’s patron saint. Segundo’s daughter Kamari dressed up as Juanita and rode in the float. The George Washington University volunteers, Tandana University scholarship students, staff members, and friends danced behind the float in the parade, dressed up as characters from the book. Having the book represented in the parade tied everything together nicely, since the George Washington University students had finished painting the mural that same day. Along with painting the mural and participating in the parade, the George Washington University students also attended Segundo’s first book signing.

Thanks to the partnership between Segundo and Tandana, readers of three different languages have the opportunity to learn about the Otavaleño culture and the Andean worldview in a fun and unique way. Juanita the Colorful Butterfly is now available for purchase on Tandana’s online store.

main Spanish

 

Por Susan Koller

Cuando la hija de Segundo Moreta Morales, Kamari, era niña, antes de acostarse, siempre quería escuchar cuentos como el de Caperucita Roja. Segundo, que siempre ha sido un apasionado de promocionar su cultura, pensó: “¿Por qué no hay cuentos de niños que representen la cultura Otavaleña?” Esto le inspiró a escribir historias sobre su cultura que reflejaban la forma andina de ver la vida y promover los valores positivos como la protección del mundo natural. Junto con el mantenimiento vivo de la cultura y la forma de los ecuatorianos de ver la vida, Segundo también creyó que debería compartirlas con el resto del mundo.  

ilustraciones del libro

ilustracion del libro

Con la ayuda de la Fundación Tandana, Segundo acaba de publicar una de estas historias, Juanita la mariposa de colores, y ha conseguido su objetivo. Este encantador cuento ilustrado para niños narra la historia de una mariposa que pierde su color tras ser hechizada por una bruja. Sin embargo, todos los amigos de la naturaleza de Juanita le ayudan a recuperar su color de nuevo. La historia se desarrolla en los meses de febrero y marzo, durante los cuales tiene lugar el festival de las flores en la ciudad de Otavalo. Junto con la publicación de este cuento, Tandana también ha ayudado a Segundo a contratar dos artistas indígenas: Inti Gualapuro y Luis Uksha, para dibujar las ilustraciones. El tener ilustradores indígenas significa que las ilustraciones también representan la cultura y la forma de ver la vida andina: Juanita es retratada como una niña indígena.

El cuento está escrito en tres lenguas diferentes: inglés, español y quichua (la lengua de la mayoría de los indígenas en Ecuador). De esta manera, las personas de diferentes culturas pueden disfrutar de este precioso cuento. Sin embargo, Segundo espera que sus lectores no solo se entretengan, sino que se imaginen visitando Otavalo y experimentando la belleza del paisaje.

Segundo cumplió el sueño de toda su vida y se convirtió en escritor al publicar este cuento. Cuando se le preguntó cómo se siente al publicar su cuento, el dijo:

Segundo Moreta Morales

Segundo Moreta Morales

“El sentimiento de mi ser es indescriptible, tengo mucha emocion, alegria, ganas de llorar, y bueno una mezcla de sentimientos, es gratificante tener un trabajo escrito propio, la alegria es grande, poder dar a concoer al mundo una partecita pequeñita de mi pueblo Otavalo, la tierra que me vio nacer, decir como me siento es indescriptible.”

Segundo tiene más planes para Juanita la mariposa de colores. Le gustaría expandir la historia y diseñar juegos para niños, escribir canciones y tener libros para colorear basados en esta historia. En el futuro, le gustaría publicar más libros con la ayuda de Tandana. Ahora mismo desea que todos disfruten de este cuento.

Tandana se involucró en este proyecto porque el libro promociona el cometido de la fundación “fortalecer a las personas de diferente origen cultural a través de una mayor concienciación sobre el mundo, sobre otras culturas y sobre ellos mismos; y a través del desarrollo de oportunidades”; además de la larga relación existente entre Segundo y la fundación.

La relación entre Tandana y Segundo resulta natural. Segundo, que actualmente enseña Educación Física y Quichua en el colegio Alejandro Chavez en Gualsaqui, es un amigo y seguidor de Tandana desde hace mucho tiempo. Su primer encuentro fue con Anna Taft la directora fundadora de Tandana, cuando ambos enseñaban en el colegio Ati Pillahuasu en Panecillo en 1998.  A lo largo de los años, Segundo ha acogido en su casa a muchos voluntarios de Tandana, ha dado charlas a grupos voluntarios sobre la cultura indígena y la educación bilingüe;this además de haber ayudado a Tandana con varios proyectos.

trabajando en el mural

trabajando en el mural

Juanita la mariposa de colores ha inspirado más proyectos a Tandana. En marzo de 2016, un grupo de voluntarios de la Universidad de George Washington  ayudaron a pintar un mural del libro en la pared de fuera del colegio comunitario en Quichinche. Los administradores del colegio y los profesores de arte buscaban una manera de dar vidilla al edificio de jardín de infancia, a la vez que promovían la lectura. Pensaban pintar un mural de un cuento de hadas cuando Anna sugirió que utilizaran un cuento de hadas de su zona local. Les gustó la idea y eligieron hacer un mural de Juanita. El pintar el mural tardó alrededor de una semana y consiste de siete paneles. Cada panel representa una ilustración diferente del libro. Para pintar el mural, los voluntarios de la Universidad de George Washington trabajaron junto a los estudiantes de 10 grado, el profesor de arte del colegio y un artista local.

festividades del desfile

La hija de Segundo en el desfile

Juanita también fue la inspiración para la carroza de Tandana en el desfile del Santo Patrón en Quichinche en marzo de 2016.  El desfile abre los festejos de un fin de semana largo para celebrar San José, el Santo Patrón de Quichinche. Kamari, la hija de Segundo, se vistió de  Juanita y se paseó en la carroza. Los voluntarios de la universidad de George Washington, los estudiantes universitarios becados por Tandana, miembros del personal y amigos acompañaron a la carroza en el desfile y se vistieron de varios personajes del cuento. Tener el cuento representado en el desfile aunó todo de forma perfecta, ya que los estudiantes de la Universidad de George Washington habían terminado de pintar el mural el mismo día que el desfile. Además de pintar el mural y participar en el desfile, los estudiantes de esta universidad también asistieron a la firma del primer cuento de Segundo. Gracias a la colaboración entre Segundo y Tandana, los lectores de tres lenguas diferentes tendrán la oportunidad de aprender sobre la cultura otavaleña y la forma andina de ver la vida, de una manera única y divertida. Juanita la mariposa  de colores se encuentra ahora disponible para comprar en la tienda online de Tandana.

 

main French

 

Par Susan Koller

Quand la fille de Segundo Moreta Morales, Kamari, était jeune, elle voulait toujours écouter des histoires comme celle du Petit Chaperon rouge avant d’aller se coucher. Segundo, qui s’est toujours passionné pour la promotion de sa culture commença alors à penser, “pourquoi n’y aurait-il pas des histoires pour enfants représentatives dela cultureotavalienne?” Cela l’inspira à écrire des histoires basées sur sa culture qui représentaientla vision du monde andine, et qui faisaient la promotionde valeurs positives telles que la protection du monde naturel. Plus que de faire perpétuer la culture et la vision du mondepour les personnes en Equateur, Segundo croit également qu’elles devraient être partagées avec d’autres partout dans le monde.

illustrations du livre

illustration du livre

Avec l’aide de la Fondation Tandana, Segundo vient tout juste de publier une de ces histoires, Juanita Le Papillon multicolore,et atteindre son but. Ce charmant livre illustré pour enfants raconte l’histoire d’un papillon qui perdit ses couleurs quandune sorcièrelui jeta un mauvais sort. Heureusement, toutes les amiescréatures de la nature de Juanita l’aident à retrouver ses couleurs. L’histoire se déroule en Février et Mars, qui est la période où la Fête de la  floraison se tient dans la ville d’Otavalo. En plus de la publication du livre, Tandana a aussi aidé Segundo à s’associer avecdeux artistesindigènesInti Gualapuro etLuis Uksha pour dessiner des illustrations. Avoir des illustrateurs indigènes signifie que les illustrations représentent également la cultureet la vision du monde andine: Juanita est décritecomme une jeune fille indigène.

Le livre est rédigé en trois différenteslangues, anglais, espagnol, et kichwa (la langue de la majorité de la population indigène en Equateur). De cette façon, des personnes de différentes cultures peuvent apprécier lamerveilleuse histoire. Cependant, Segundoespèreque ses lecteurs sont bien plus que simplement divertis. Il voudrait que ces derniers envisagent d’aller à Otavalo pour contempler la beauté du site.

En publiant ce livre, Segundoréalisa le rêve de sa vie qui était de devenir écrivain.Quand on lui demandece qu’il pense de la publication de son livre, il répond,

Segundo Moreta Morales

Segundo Moreta Morales

“Ce que je ressens est indescriptible, C’est de l’enthousiasme, de la joie, de l’émotion, et un mélange de sentiments.C’est gratifiant d’avoir un livre que j’ai moi-même écrit. C’est une immense joie que de pouvoir partager avec le monde une petite partie de ma culture d’Otovalo, la terre où je suis né. Il n’y a pas de mots pour décrire ce que je ressens.”

Segundo a plus de projets pour Juanita Le Papillon multicolore. Il veutcréer la suite de cette histoire et concevoir des jeux pour enfants, écrire des chansons, etavoir des livres de coloriage inspirés de l’histoire. A l’avenir, Segundo voudrait publier plus de livres avec l’aide de Tandana. Mais pour le moment, il veut que chacun savourele récit.

Tandana s’impliqua dans ce projet parce quele livre fait la promotion de la mission de la Fondationqui est “d’éduquer des individus d’origines culturelles différentes avec une sensibilisation accrue au monde, aux autres cultureset d’eux-mêmes, etavecun élargissement de leur champ de possibilités”, ainsi que de la relation positive de longue date entre Segundo et la Fondation.

Le partenariat entre Tandana et Segundo est un partenariat naturel. Segundo, qui enseigne actuellementl’éducation physique et le Kichwa à l’Ecole Alejandro Chavez à Gualsaqui, estun ami et supporter de Tandana depuis longtemps.Il fit d’abord la connaissance d’Anna Taft, la directrice fondatrice de Tandana, quand ils étaient tous les deux enseignants à l’Ecole Ati Pillahuasu de Panecillo en 1998.  Au fil des ans, Segundo a accueilli beaucoup de bénévoles de Tandana dans sa maison, a prononcé des discours à l’attention des groupes de bénévolesà propos de la culture indigène et de l’éducation bilingue, et a aidé Tandana dans plusieurs projets.

travail sur la peinture murale

travail sur la peinture murale

Juanita Le Papillon multicolorea inspiré plusieurs projets Tandana. En Mars 2016, un groupe de bénévoles de l’Université de George Washington aidaà peindre une fresque inspirée du livre sur le mur extérieur de l’école de la communautéde Quichinche. Les administrateurs de l’école et les professeurs d’art réfléchissaient à un moyen dedonner vie au secteur préscolaire de l’école tout en faisant la promotion de la lecture. Ils pensaient alors réaliser la fresque d’un conte de féesquand Anna leur suggéra d’utiliser un contetiré de leur culture locale. Ils aimèrent cette idée et choisirent de peindre une fresque de Juanita. Il a fallu une semaine pour peindre la fresque qui consiste en sept panneaux. Chaque panneau représenteuneillustration différentetirée du livre. Les bénévoles de l’Université de George Washington ont travaillé côte à côte avecdes élèves de 10e année de l’école, les professeurs d’art de l’école et un artiste local pour peindre la fresque.

festivités défilé

festivités défilé

Juanita fut également le thème choisi pour le char de Tandana lors de la parade du jour des Saints àQuichinche en Mars 2016. La parade ouvre les festivités qui durent le temps d’un week-end et qui célèbrentSt. Joseph, le Saint patron de Quichinche. Kamari, la fille de Segundo, se déguisaen Juanita et monta dans le char. Les bénévoles de l’Université de George Washington, les étudiants universitaires boursiers de Tandana, les membres du personnel, et les amis accompagnèrentle char dans la parade et étaientdéguisés en personnages du livre. Avoir le livre représenté dans la parade fit que tout s’emboita parfaitement,d’autant plus queles étudiants de l’Université de George Washington avaient achevéla fresque le jour même où avait lieu la parade. Outre la peinture de la fresque et leur participation à la parade,les étudiants de l’Université de George Washington assistèrent également à la dédicace du premier livre de Segundo.

 

Grâce au partenariat entre Segundo et Tandana, des lecteurs de trois différentes langues auront la chance de découvrir la culture et la vision du monde otavaliennes d’une manière ludique et originale. Juanita La Papillone multicolore est maintenant disponible à la vente dans la boutique en ligne de Tandana.

main

 

A Young Volunteer Reports on her Ecuador Trip with Ohio State Master Gardeners

 

Nola and Hudi, an Ecuadorian student she met during her trip

Nola and Hudi, an Ecuadorian student she met during her trip

Hi! My name is Nola Killpack and I am twelve years old. I just spent a week in Highland Ecuador with a small group of Master Gardeners from Ohio and Michigan. I am not a Master Gardener, but my mom invited me to come along as a volunteer.  This service trip through the Tandana Foundation allowed us to be in communities, not as tourists but as friends and work as partners. I never would have guessed that this is how I would spend the third week of February! Before we left I had no idea what to expect. I am studying Spanish at school so it was a perfect place to practice Spanish, and indeed when I was there, I even thought in Spanish. I was also challenged to learn a few words of the native language Kichwa – ‘mashi’ means friend and ‘pai’ means thank you, especially for food.Miles, Megan and Mateo were our guides for our week of experiences and adventures. I will always remember doing yoga with Mateo (and LaCresia!) in the garden.  Megan helped me so much with my Spanish. Miles stayed up all night to pick us up at the Quito airport at 3:30am in the morning. Don Galo is the best bus driver ever!  I loved talking with Maria Cristina because she is a true Ecuadorian!

planting trees in Pastavi

planting trees in Pastavi

Our first working day was Sunday. We travelled to Pastavi, a town twenty-seven kilometers north of the Equator. We partnered with this town to plant about 130 trees. The people hoped that these trees would beautify their town and purify the air. Don Teofilo showed us how deep to plant the trees and how much compost to use.  As I worked with Hedy, I enjoyed talking with the children and watching the chickens and dogs. It was a very hot day to dig and carry water, but we were able to look forward to lunch with the community. A minga is a community gathering to work together and usually includes a feast afterwards. The lunch at our minga was very delicious and hosted at Don Carlos and Susana’s house. In their courtyard Susana laid out reed mats and put sheets on top. Community members brought some food to share with everyone. They gave their food to Susana who placed it onto the sheet. Then all the guests and community members came up to fill their bowls with food.  Most of us used our fingers to eat from the bowl. There were potatoes, rice, chicken intestines, chicken, corn, hard boiled eggs and watercress. It was fun to put popcorn on top! I thought it was interesting to try the chicken intestines and the many differently prepared colorful potatoes. It was inspirational to see that the president of this town was a woman. President Inez gave a speech of thanks which was followed by a Valentine’s message, in English, from Tandana scholarship student Monica. On this first work day I realized how special it was to be included in this circle of trust that had already been established between the Tandana Foundation and this community.

That afternoon we met at the Tandana office and hiked down a steep hill to the Cocina Samyanuy cooking school. We were greeted by Claudia and her cousin Margarita.

a Master Gardener cooking chicken

a Master Gardener cooking chicken

Our group was taught how to make quinoa pancakes with ham and vegetables, salad with radishes and lupin beans (which are only edible after being soaked and rinsed for several days), hot salad with carrots, cauliflower and broccoli and chicken that we cooked on a skillet over an open fire. For dessert we had quimbolitos, which are like a sugary, buttery cornmeal paste wrapped and steamed in a banana leaf. To drink we had passion fruit and naranjilla juice.  As a Valentine’s treat, Claudia had made homemade chocolates!

After our cooking lesson, Claudia’s cousin Margarita showed us around their vegetable and herb garden. She taught us the names of the plants and their medicinal uses. Then Margarita taught us about the traditional dress of Otavalo and I even got to try it on! The traditional dress includes a ribbon wrapped around hair, gold earrings, gold necklaces and red bracelets to ward off evil spirits. Women wear embroidered blouses under shawls. Women thirty-five and older wear these shawls as headscarves, unmarried women tie it on their left shoulder, married women tie it on their right shoulder, and older women tie it in the middle. Women wear skirts called anacos. The layer on the bottom is white or cream and represents day.  The top is black or navy blue and represents night. To hold the anacos in place women use two belts. The bigger one is called the mama chumbi and the smaller one is called the wawachumbi. They are wrapped tightly around the waist on top of each other.

Claudia is my role model because she has so many dreams.  Unlike most people she does not think of dreams as only dreams, but as her real future and she works hard to fulfill her goals.  She was a dedicated scholarship student through Tandana and her dreams became reality when she opened a cooking school.  She is now building a bed and breakfast and hopes to open a museum showcasing the original home built in traditional mud wall and thatch technique.

planting ornamentals at the Quichinche school

planting ornamentals at the Quichinche school

My favorite day was Monday, our first of four days working at the Quichinche school. This school has about seven hundred students and we helped to plant ornamental and medicinal gardens and many trees. As soon as we started to carry plants from the school yard up the hill to the gardens, kids started talking to me. They asked me what onion, kitchen and chicken were in English. Most of the students in this group were my age and I even learned I was seven days younger than one girl, whose name was Genesis. When it was announced that we would be working with partners to plant the ornamentals, Genesis, Michelle and Anahi all wanted to be my partner. At the end of the morning I did not want to say goodbye to my friends. I wished we could be friends forever and hoped I would see them the next day.

Over the next two days we planted medicinal plants and trees with students that were a little bit older than me.  During these days we worked in a large group instead of with partners. Although Genesis, Michelle and Anahi were not assigned to the garden again, I would see them briefly and chat with them when I was filling water bottles from the hose for the plants. One day after gardening when we were loading the tools into the bus, we met a few younger kids outside of the school. A young six year old girl named Hudi kept hugging me and asking, “Why is your hair yellow?”  During our last morning at the school we were able to teach students lessons about gardening. I had worked on lesson plans with Judy and my mom during the evenings earlier in the week. After these small group lessons, the entire school held a short ceremony on the playground to say thank you…and I danced in it! was sitting with our gardening group watching the dancers when a teacher came over, grabbed my hand and pulled me towards the dancers. He started dancing and I then started dancing too! Then everyone came out and started dancing together – the teachers, all the students and the gardeners.  I will always remember that.

After we danced I was surrounded by students who wanted to braid my hair. I sat with them and I was left with some lovely braids. Now here comes the sad part…when it was over, the kids went back to their classes and I never got to say goodbye to Genesis, Michelle and Anahi! But I did get to find Hudi and share a photograph and a hug.  I don’t know if I will ever see them again, but I have the best memories!

We stayed at La Posade del Quinde.  Maggie and her staff were like family.  I loved the food, the gardens and hanging out with Pacha, the faithful perro (dog). In the afternoons, we had different adventures and outings.  We had a picnic and hiked to “La Cascada de Peguche.” We visited the home of a musician, made our own pan flutes, and listened to Jose Luiz and his family play traditional Ecuadorian music for us. I really liked visiting the reed cooperative workshop “Totora SISA” and the plant nursery in Morochos. I also went hat shopping with Brian in the Plaza de Ponchos. On our last night, we had a fancy dinner in a beautiful lodge called Casa Mojandaon the mountainside.  There was a band playing more traditional music and we all danced and played some percussion.  Judy is a great dancer! Then sadly, it was time to head to the airport.  I would have liked one more adventure – to go to the Galapagos with Jane!

I am so thankful that I had this opportunity. I loved meeting Anna and her husband John and I appreciate that The Tandana Foundation let me join in as a young volunteer. It is amazing what a group can do together and I hope I can plan another trip through Tandana with friends when I am in high school. I am grateful that Pam and Denise opened the door for me to come along!  I hope to visit you at OSU very soon!

Pai!

Tu Mashi, (Your Friend)

Nolita

 

¡Hola! Me llamo Nola Killpack y tengo 12 años. Acabo de pasar una semana en los Andes ecuatorianos con un pequeño grupo de Jardineros Maestros de Ohio y Michigan (Master Gardeners). Yo no soy una Jardinera Maestra, pero mi madre me invitó a ir con ella como voluntaria. Este viaje de voluntariado por medio de la Fundación Tandana  nos permitió vivir en comunidades, no como turistas, sino como amigos y trabajar como compañeros. Nunca hubiera imaginado que pasaría la tercera semana de febrero de esta manera. Antes de que viniéramos, no sabía qué esperarme. Yo estudio español en el colegio, así que era el lugar perfecto para practicar español; y la verdad es que una vez allí, yo incluso “pensaba” en español. También tuve el reto de aprender unas pocas palabras  en la lengua nativa  Quichua: ‘mashi’ significa amigo y ‘pai’ significa gracias, especialmente para agradecer la comida. Miles, Megan y Mateo fueron nuestros guías durante nuestra semana de experiencias y aventuras. Siempre recordaré cuando hacía yoga con Mateo (y La Cresia!) en el jardín. Megan me ayudó muchísimo con mi español. Miles estuvo despierto toda la noche para recogernos del aeropuerto de Quito a las 3:30 a.m. Don Galo es el mejor conductor de autobús del mundo.  Me encantaba hablar con Maria Cristina porque es una ecuatoriana auténtica.

Nuestro primer día de trabajo fue un domingo. Viajamos a Pastavi, un pueblo a 27 km del norte del ecuador. Nos asociamos con este pueblo para plantar 130 árboles. La gente esperaba que estos árboles embellecieran su ciudad y purificaran el aire. Don Teofilo nos enseñó a que profundidad plantar los árboles y cuánto abono utilizar.  Como yo trabajaba con Hedy, yo disfruté hablando con los niños y observando las gallinas y los perros. Hacía mucho calor para cavar y llevar agua; sin embargo, esperábamos con ganas la hora de la comida con la comunidad. Una minga es una reunión comunitaria para trabajar juntos y normalmente incluye un banquete después. La comida en nuestra minga estuvo deliciosa y se celebró en casa de Don Carlos y Susana.  En su patio Susana puso unas esteras y unas bandejas encima. Los miembros de la comunidad trajeron comida para compartir con todos.  Se la dieron a Susana que la colocó en las bandejas.  A continuación, todos los invitados y miembros de la comunidad llenaron sus cuencos con comida. La mayoría de nosotros comimos del cuenco con las manos. Había patatas, arroz, intestinos de pollo, pollo, huevos cocidos y berros. Fue divertido poner palomitas de maíz encima. Fue muy interesante probar los intestinos de pollo y la gran cantidad de patatas de diferentes colores. Me inspiró el ver que el presidente de este pueblo era una mujer. La presidenta Inez ofreció un discurso de agradecimiento, que fue seguido de un mensaje de San Valentín, en inglés, procedente de Mónica, una estudiante becada por Tandana. En este primer día de trabajo me di cuenta de lo especial que era ser incluida en el círculo de confianza que ya había sido establecido entre la Fundación Tandana y esta comunidad.

Esa tarde nos reunimos en la oficina de Tandana y bajamos una empinada colina hacia la escuela culinaria Cocina Samyanuy.  Claudia y su prima Margarita nos recibieron. A nuestro grupo se nos enseñó a hacer tortitas de quínoa con jamón y verduras,  ensalada con rábanos y alubias lupinas (las cuales solo son comestibles tras varios días en remojo y ser escurridas); ensalada caliente con zanahorias, coliflor, brécol y pollo, todo cocinado en una sartén a fuego abierto. De postre tomamos quimbolitos, que son como una pasta dulce, de harina de maíz mantecosa, envuelta y hervida en una hoja de plátano. De beber, tomamos maracuyá y un jugo de naranjilla.

preparación de la cena de San Valentín

preparación de la cena de San Valentín

Como obsequio de San Valentín, Claudia hizo bombones de chocolate caseros.

Después de la clase de cocina, Margarita, la prima de Claudia, nos mostró el jardín de verduras y hierbas. Nos enseñó los nombres de las plantas y sus usos medicinales.

Luego nos habló  del traje tradicional de Otavalo; y yo incluso me lo probé. Este vestido tradicional contiene un lazo atado alrededor del pelo, pendientes y collares de oro y pulseras rojas para protegerse de los malos espíritus. Las mujeres llevan blusas bordadas bajo los mantones. Las mujeres mayores de 35 años  llevan estos mantones como pañoletas, las mujeres solteras las llevan en el hombro izquierdo, las casadas en el hombro derecho; y las mujeres mayores en el medio.

Margarita y Nola

Margarita y Nola

Las mujeres llevan unas faldas llamadas anacos. La parte inferior es de color blanco o crema y representa el día. La parte superior es de color negro o azul marino y representa la noche. Para sujetar esta falda, las mujeres usan dos cinturones. El más grande se llama mama chumbi y el más pequeño se llama wawa chumbi. Se envuelven fuertemente  alrededor de la cintura uno encima del otro.

Claudia es mi ejemplo a seguir porque ella tiene tantos sueños. A diferencia de otras personas, ella no considera sus sueños meros sueños, sino su futuro real y trabaja mucho para alcanzar su meta. Ella era una dedicada estudiante becada por Tandana y sus sueños se hicieron realidad al abrir una escuela culinaria. Ahora está construyendo un hostal en régimen de alojamiento y desayuno;  y confía en abrir un museo que muestre la  primera casa construida con la técnica tradicional de paredes de barro y paja.

Mi día favorito fue el lunes, nuestro primer día de los cuatro trabajando en la escuela Quichinche. Esta escuela tiene 700 estudiantes y les ayudamos a plantar jardines ornamentales y medicinales, además de numerosos árboles. En cuanto comenzamos a llevar plantas desde el patio del colegio cuesta arriba hasta los jardines, los niños  empezaron a hablar conmigo. Me preguntaban cómo se decía cebolla, cocina y pollo en inglés. La mayoría de los estudiantes en este grupo eran de mi edad, incluso descubrí que yo era solo siete días más joven que una de las chicas, llamada Genesis. Cuando nos anunciaron que trabajaríamos en parejas para plantar los jardines ornamentales, todos: Genesis, Michelle and Anahi querían ser mi pareja. Al finalizar la mañana no quería despedirme de mis amigos. Quería que fuésemos amigos para siempre y esperaba verlos al día siguiente.

Durante los dos días siguientes plantamos plantas y árboles medicinales con estudiantes un poco mayores que yo.  En estos días trabajamos en un grupo grande en vez de en parejas. Aunque a Genesis, Michelle y Anahi no se les asignó trabajo en el jardín de nuevo, yo los veía un poco y hablaba con ellos cuando iba a rellenar las botellas de agua con la manguera para las plantas. Un día después de hacer los jardines, cuando estábamos cargando las herramientas en el autobús, nos encontramos con niños pequeños fuera de la escuela. Hudi, una niña de seis años, me abrazaba y preguntaba: “¿por qué tu pelo es amarillo?”  En nuestra última mañana en la escuela pudimos dar clase sobre jardinería a los alumnos. Yo había estado planificando mis clases con Judy y mi madre durante las tardes anteriores. Tras estas clases con pequeños grupos, la escuela entera organizó una breve ceremonia en el patio para dar las gracias… y yo bailé.  Estaba sentada con nuestro grupo de jardinería mirando a los bailarines cuando un profesor se me acercó, me cogió de la mano y me llevó con los bailarines. Empezó a bailar y entonces yo comencé a bailar también.  A continuación, todos salieron y empezaron a bailar juntos: los profesores, todos los estudiantes y los jardineros. Nunca se me olvidará.

 

trenzado de cabello

trenzado de cabello

Después de bailar, me encontré rodeada de estudiantes que querían trenzar mi pelo.  Me senté con ellos y me hicieron unas trenzas preciosas. Ahora llega la parte triste…, cuando se acabó, los niños volvieron a sus clases y no pude despedirme de Genesis, Michelle y Anahi. Sin embargo, encontré a Hudi y nos hicimos una foto y nos abrazamos. No sé si volveré a verlos alguna vez, pero guardo los mejores recuerdos. 

Nos alojamos en la Posada Quinde.  Maggie y sus empleados eran como una familia. Me encantó la comida, los jardines y pasar el rato con Pacha, el perro fiel. Por las tardes, teníamos diferentes aventuras y excursiones. Hicimos un picnic y caminamos hasta La Cascada de Peguche. Visitamos la casa de un músico, hicimos nuestras propias flautas de pan y escuchamos a Jose Luiz y su familia tocar para nosotros  música ecuatoriana tradicional. Me gustó mucho visitar el taller cooperativo de esteras “Totora SISA”  y  el vivero en Morochos.  También fui a comprar un sombrero con  Brian a la Plaza de Ponchos. En nuestra última noche, tuvimos una cena de gala en una cabaña preciosa en las montañas llamada Casa Mojanda.  Había una banda tocando música tradicional y todos bailamos y tocamos algunos instrumentos de percusión. Judy es una gran bailarina. Tristemente, llegó la hora de ir al aeropuerto. Me hubiera gustado vivir una aventura más, como ir a las islas Galápagos con Jane. 

Estoy tan agradecida de haber tenido esta oportunidad. Me encantó conocer a Anna y su esposo John; y agradezco a la Fundación Tandana que me dejara venir como una joven voluntaria.  Es increíble lo que un grupo puede hacer al unísono; y espero poder planificar otro viaje a través de Tandana con amigos una vez esté en la escuela secundaria. Estoy agradecida a Pam y Denise por abrirme las puertas. Espero visitaros en La Universidad Estatal de Ohio (OSU, por sus siglas en inglés) muy pronto.

Pai!

Tu Mashi, (Vuestra amiga)

Nolita

 

Bonjour! Je m’appelle Nola Killpack et j’ai douze ans. Je viens tout juste de passer une semaine dans les régions montagneuses de l’Equateur avec un petit groupe de Maîtres jardiniers de l’Ohio et du Michigan. Je ne suis pas un Maître Jardinier mais ma mère m’avait invité  à participer comme bénévole. Ce séjour de service à travers la Fondation Tandana nous a permis d’être dans des communautés non pas comme des touristes mais comme des amis, et de travailler comme des partenaires. Je n’aurais jamais pu imaginer que je passerais la troisième semaine de Février de cette façon! Avant notre départ, je n’avais aucune idée de ce qui m’attendait. Je suis en train d’apprendre l’espagnol à l’école donc c’était l’endroit parfait pour pratiquer mon espagnol, et en effet quand je fus là-bas, j’ai même réfléchi en espagnol. J’ai également été mise au défi d’apprendre quelques mots de la langue autochtone Kichwa – ‘mashi’ veut dire ami et ‘pai’ veut dire merci, spécialement pour la nourriture. Miles, Megan and Mateo furent nos guides pour notre semaine d’expériences et d’aventures. Je me souviendrais toujours des séances de yoga avec Mateo (et La Cresia!) dans le jardin.  Megan m’a beaucoup aidé avec mon espagnol. Miles resta debout toute la nuit pour nous récupérer à l’aéroport de Quito à 03h30 du matin. Don Galo est le meilleur des conducteurs! J’ai adoré parler avec Maria Cristina parce que c’est une vraie Equatorienne!

Notre premier jour de travail fut le Dimanche. Nous nous rendîmes à Pastavi, une ville située à vingt-sept kilomètres au Nord de l’Equateur. Nous avons collaboré avec ce village pour planter environs130 arbres. La population espérait que ces arbres allaient embellir leur village et purifier l’air. Don Teofilo nous a montré à quelle profondeur planter les arbres et la quantité de compost à utiliser.  Comme je travaillais avec Hedy, j’ai pris plaisir à parler avec les enfants et à regarder les poulets et les chiens. Ce fut une journée très chaude passée à creuser et à transporter de l’eau, mais nous avons pu attendre avec impatience le déjeuner avec la communauté. Une minga est un rassemblement de la communauté pour travailler ensemble et elle est en général suivit d’une fête. Le déjeuner à notre minga fut très bon et eut lieu à la maison de Don Carlos et de Susana. Dans la cour intérieure, Susana étala des nattes de roseaux et posa des nappes au-dessus. Des membres de la communauté apportèrent de la nourriture à partager avec tout le monde.  Ils donnèrent leurs plats à Susanna qui les disposa sur la nappe.

alimentaire minga

alimentaire minga

Puis tous les invités et les membres de la communauté vinrent remplir leurs bols avec de la nourriture. La plupart d’entre nous avons utilisés nos doigts pour manger dans le bol. Il y avait des pommes de terre, du riz, des intestins de poulet, du poulet, du maïs, des œufs durs et du cresson. C’était drôle de mettre du pop-corn par-dessus! J’ai trouvé cela intéressant de goûter aux intestins de poulet et aux pommes de terre pleines de couleur cuisinées de diverses manières. Ce fut une source d’inspiration de voir que la présidente de ce village était une femme. La Présidente Inez donna un discours de remerciement qui fut suivit d’un message de St Valentin, en anglais, de la part Monica, l’étudiante boursière de Tandana. Lors de ce premier jour de travail, j’ai réalisé que c’était un privilège d’être intégrée à ce cercle de confiance qui avait déjà été créée entre la Fondation Tandana et cette communauté.

Cet après-midi-là, nous nous sommes retrouvés au bureau de Tandana et nous avons descendu une colline escarpée pour rejoindre l’école de cuisine Cocina Samyanuy. Nous avions été accueilli par Claudia et sa cousine Margarita. On enseigna à notre groupe comment faire des galettes de quinoa avec du jambon et des légumes, des salades avec des radis et des fèves de lupin (qui ne sont comestibles qu’après avoir été trempées durant plusieurs jours et rincées), des salades chaudes avec des carottes, choux fleurs et brocolis et poulet que nous avons cuit dans une poêle au-dessus d’un feu en plein air. Pour le dessert nous avons eu des quimbolitos, qui sont des sortes de purées à la semoule de maïs sucrées et onctueuses enveloppées dans une feuille de bananier et cuites à la vapeur. En boisson, on nous a servi du jus de fruit de la passion et de narangille.  En guise de friandise de St Valentin, Claudia avait confectionné des chocolats faits maisons!

jardins Samyanuy

jardins Samyanuy

Après notre cours de cuisine, Margarita, la cousine de Claudia nous a fait visiter leur potager et leur jardin d’herbes. Elle nous enseigna les noms des plantes et leurs usages médicinaux. Ensuite, Margarita nous donna un enseignement à propos la robe traditionnelle d’Otavalo et j’ai même dû en essayer une! La robe traditionnelle comprend un ruban noué dans les cheveux, des boucles d’oreille en or, des colliers en or et des bracelets rouges pour se protéger des mauvais esprits. Les femmes portent des blouses brodées sous des châles. Les femmes de plus de trente-cinq ans portent ces châles comme des foulards sur leurs têtes, les femmes célibataires l’attachent sur leur épaule gauche, les femmes mariées le mettent sur leur épaule droite, et les femmes âgées l’attachent au milieu. Les femmes portent des jupes appelées anacos. La partie du bas est de couleur blanche ou crème et représente le jour.  Le haut est noir ou bleu marine et représente la nuit. Pour tenir les anacos en place, les femmes utilisent deux ceintures. La plus grosse est appelée la mama chumbi et la plus petite est appelée la wawachumbi. Elles sont attachées fermement autour de la taille les unes sur les autres.

Claudia est mon modèle parce qu’elle a tellement de rêves. Contrairement à la plupart des gens, elle ne voit pas les rêves comme de simples rêves, mais comme un réel projet et elle travaille dure pour atteindre ses objectifs. Elle avait été une étudiante boursière dévouée à travers  Tandana et son rêve devint réalité quand elle ouvrit une école de cuisine. Maintenant, elle est en train de construire des chambres d’hôtes et elle espère pouvoir ouvrir un musée mettant en vitrine la technique traditionnelle de construction de maison en mur de boue séchée et de chaume.

Mon jour préféré fut le Lundi, le premier de nos quatre jours de travail à l’école Quichinche. Cette école compte environs sept cents élèves et nous avons aidé à planter des jardins d’agrément et de plantes médicinales et beaucoup d’arbres. Aussitôt que nous avons commencé à transporter les plants de la cours de l’école jusqu’en haut de la colline vers les jardins, des enfants commencèrent à me parler. Ils me demandèrent comment se disait oignon, cuisine et poulet en anglais. La plupart des élèves de ce groupe avaient mon âge et j’ai même appris que j’étais plus jeune de 7 jours qu’une fille qui s’appelait Genesis. Quand il nous a été annoncé que nous allions travailler avec des partenaires pour planter les plantes décoratives, Genesis, Michelle et Anahi tous ensembles voulaient être mon partenaire. A la fin de la matinée, je n’ai pas voulu dire au revoir à mes amies. Je souhaitais que nous puissions rester amies pour toujours et j’espérais les revoir le jour suivant.

la plantation de plantes médicinales dans les jardins scolaires Quichinche

la plantation de plantes médicinales dans les jardins scolaires Quichinche

Au cours des deux jours suivant nous avons planté des plantes médicinales et des arbres avec des élèves qui étaient un peu plus âgés que moi. Durant ces jours nous avions travaillé en grands groupes plutôt qu’avec des partenaires. Bien que Genesis, Michelle et Anahi ne fussent pas de nouveau affectées au jardin, je les aurais vues brièvement et j’aurais discuté avec elles lorsque je remplissais les bouteilles d’eau pour les plantes avec le tuyau. Un jour, après avoir jardiné et alors que nous chargions les outils dans le bus, nous avons rencontré quelques jeunes enfants à l’extérieur de l’école. Une jeune fille âgée de six ans qui s’appelait Hudi n’arrêtait pas de me serrer dans ses bras et de me demander “Pourquoi tes cheveux sont jaunes?” Lors de notre dernière matinée à l’école, nous avons pu donner aux élèves des leçons de jardinage. J’avais travaillé sur des programmes de cours avec Judy et ma mère durant les après-midi, un peu plus tôt dans la semaine. Après ces cours en petits groupes, l’école toute entière tient une cérémonie dans la cours de récréation pour nous remercier…..et j’y ai même dansé! J’étais assise avec notre groupe de jardinage à regarder les danseurs quand un professeur s’approcha, attrapa ma main et m’emmena vers les danseurs. Il commença à danser et je me suis donc mise à danser aussi! Puis tout le monde vint et commença à danser ensemble – les professeurs, tous les élèves et les jardiniers. Ce sera un souvenir inoubliable.

Après que nous ayons dansé, je fus entourée par des élèves qui voulaient natter mes cheveux. Je m’assis avec eux et je me suis retrouvée avec plein de jolies tresses. Nous en arrivons maintenant à la partie triste de l’histoire…quand ça s’est terminé, les enfants retournèrent à leurs classes et je n’ai jamais pu dire au revoir à Genesis, Michelle et Anahi! Mais j’ai pu retrouver Hudi et partager une photo et une embrassade avec elle.  Je ne sais pas si je les reverrais un jour, mais j’ai gardé les plus beaux des souvenirs!

Nous avons séjourné à La Posade del Quinde. Maggie et son personnel étaient comme de la famille. J’ai adoré la nourriture, les jardins et sortir avec Pacha, le chien fidèle. Durant les après-midi, on avait différentes aventures et balades.  Nous avons eu un pique-nique et  fait une randonnée jusqu’à “La Cascada de Peguche”. Nous avons visité la maison d’un musicien, fabriqué nos propres flûtes de pan et écouté Jose Luiz et sa famille nous jouer de la musique traditionnelle équatorienne. J’ai vraiment aimé visiter l’atelier coopératif de roseaux “Totora SISA” et la pépinière à Morochos. Je suis aussi allée acheter un chapeau avec Brian à la Plaza de Ponchos. Lors de notre dernière soirée, nous avons eu un grand diner dans une belle auberge dénommée Casa Mojandaon située sur le flanc de la montagne.  Il y avait un groupe qui jouait de la musique plus traditionnelle et nous avons tous dansés et joués quelques percussions. Judy est un danseur exceptionnel! Puis malheureusement, ce fût le moment de se diriger vers l’aéroport. J’aurais aimé vivre une aventure de plus – aller aux Galapagos avec Jane!

Je suis très reconnaissante d’avoir eu cette opportunité. J’ai bien aimé faire la connaissance d’Anna et de son mari John et j’apprécie que la Fondation  m’ait laissé me joindre à eux en tant que jeune bénévole. C’est incroyable ce qu’un groupe peut réaliser ensemble et j’espère que je pourrais faire un autre voyage avec Tandana avec des amis quand je serais à l’école secondaire. Je remercie Pam et Denise de m’avoir ouverte les portes pour les accompagner!  J’espère avoir encore l’occasion de vous rendre visite à OSU très bientôt!

Pai!

Tu Mashi, (Votre amie)

Nolita